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Friday AM


Coffee Break  Friday, 7:308:30  California Ballroom Foyer (Level 2) 


1. Plenary Session: Presidential Address and Presentation of SIOP Award Winners, Fellows, and Election Results 

Friday, 8:309:50  San Francisco (Level 2)

Computerized Testing and Assessment: Boon or Boondoggle?

Leaetta M. Hough, Dunnette Group, Ltd., Chair 

Fritz Drasgow, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Presenter


Coffee Break  Friday, 10:0010:30  Pasadena (Lower Level)


2. Panel Discussion: Friday, 10:3011:50  San Jose (Level 2)

Practically Speaking, Does Stereotype Threat Really Matter?

Anecdotal evidence suggests organizational interest in stereotype threat effects on minorities test performance in selection contexts. The objective of this panel discussion is to provide the audience with an overview regarding the generalizability and practical implications of stereotype threat findings, as well as the meaningfulness of proposed stereotype threat interventions.

Ann Marie Ryan, Michigan State University, Chair

Hannah-Hanh Dung Nguyen, Michigan State University, Co-Chair

Paul R. Sackett, University of Minnesota, Panelist

Nancy T. Tippins, Personnel Research Associates, Inc., Panelist

Lawrence J. Stricker, Educational Testing Service, Panelist

Hannah-Hanh Dung Nguyen, Michigan State University, Panelist

Submitted by Hannah-Hanh Dung Nguyen, nguyen67@msu.edu

3. Panel Discussion: Friday, 10:3011:50 San Francisco (Level 2)

The Usefulness of Personality Variables at Work

A panel of journal editors discussed faking on personality tests in a well-attended session at the 2004 SIOP conference. The discussion was redirected to questioning the usefulness of personality. The purpose of this panel is to address the usefulness of personality at work.

Milton Hakel, Bowling Green State University, Chair

Neal W. Schmitt, Michigan State University, Panelist

Benjamin Schneider, Personnel Research Associates, Inc., Panelist

Murray R. Barrick, University of Iowa, Panelist

Jose M. Cortina, George Mason University, Panelist

Deniz S. Ones, University of Minnesota, Panelist

Submitted by Murray R. Barrick, m-barrick@uiowa.edu

4. Symposium: Friday, 10:3011:50 Sacramento (Level 2)

Facilitating Response and Understanding Nonresponse to Internet/Intranet Questionnaire Efforts

This symposium will provide insights into facilitating response to Internet questionnaires, the factors affecting data quality of Internet questionnaires, and understanding the differences between those who do and those who do not respond to Internet questionnaires. 5 studies will be presented, each addressing one or more of the issues above.

Steven G. Rogelberg, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, Chair

Ian S. Little, Bowling Green State University, Co-Chair

Jeffrey M. Stanton, Syracuse University, Elizabeth Weiss, Georgia Institute of Technology, Using a Standing Panel to Explore Nonresponse Issues

Stephen A. Dwight, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Dominic Fernandes, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Kelly Polanco, Bristol-Myers Squibb, The Impact of Survey Reminder Source and Frequency on Responding

Kevin Tomczak, Applied Psychological Techniques, John C. Scott, Applied Psychological Techniques, Getting Your Mail Returned: Nonrespondent Characteristics to Web-Based Job Analysis Studies

Julie A. Fuller, PepsiCo, Allan H. Church, PepsiCo, Janine Waclawski, Pepsi-Cola Company, Is Late Better Than Never? Response Quality in Multisource Feedback

Steven G. Rogelberg, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, Ian S. Little, Bowling Green State University, Christiane Spitzmueller, University of Houston, Internet Satisfaction Surveys: Profiling the Nonrespondents 

Herman Aguinis, University of Colorado-Denver, Discussant

Submitted by Steven G. Rogelberg, sgrogelb@email.uncc.edu

5. Panel Discussion: Friday, 10:3011:50 Emerald Bay (Level 3)

Scaling the Slippery Slope: Toe Holds for Women in Academe

Five distinguished panelists at various stages of their academic careers will discuss issues identified by the APA Task Force on Women in Academe, whose report recommended that institutions, departments, and programs cultivate a climate supportive of women faculty. Questions from the audience will also be solicited and addressed.

Karen Holcombe Ehrhart, San Diego State University, Chair

Jennifer Z. Gillespie, Bowling Green State University, Co-Chair

Jeanette N. Cleveland, Pennsylvania State University, Panelist

Michele J. Gelfand, University of Maryland, Panelist

Lynn A. McFarland, Clemson University, Panelist

Lois E. Tetrick, George Mason University, Panelist

Kecia M. Thomas, University of Georgia, Panelist

Submitted by Karen Holcombe Ehrhart, kehrhart@sunstroke.sdsu.edu

6. Panel Discussion: Friday, 10:3011:50 Santa Anita A (Lobby Level)

Homology Models: Generalizing Organizational Theories and Practices to New Levels

Homology models attempt to generalize relationships among similar variables across levels of analysis. This multilevel expert panel will discuss conceptual, methodological, and practical issues regarding testing homology models with the goal of informing SIOP members of the importance of such models to the advancement of I-O theory, research, and practice.

Gilad Chen, Texas A&M University, Chair

Paul D. Bliese, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Panelist

David Chan, National University of Singapore, Panelist

Gilad Chen, Texas A&M University, Panelist

David A. Hofmann, University of North Carolina, Panelist

Lawrence R. James, Georgia Tech, Panelist

Steve W. J. Kozlowski, Michigan State University, Panelist

Submitted by Gilad Chen, gilad.chen@tamu.edu

7. Theoretical Advancement: Friday, 10:3011:50 Santa Anita B (Lobby Level)

Volitional and Nonvolitional Effects of Identification on Employee Behavior

A new theory of how employee identification affects behavior is presented by two attachment scholars and critiqued by a panel of experts. The theory links target abstractness and prototypicality to goal mechanisms and behavior through commitment and identification dynamics. Volitional and nonvolitional aspects of both paths are identified.

Rolf Van Dick, Aston University, Chair

Thomas E. Becker, University of Delaware, John P. Meyer, University of Western Ontario, Volitional and Nonvolitional Effects of Identification on Employee Behavior

Robert J. Vandenberg, University of Georgia, Discussant

Fred A. Mael, American Institutes for Research, Discussant

Michael G. Pratt, Discussant

Lynn M. Shore, University of California, Irvine, Discussant

Submitted by Thomas E. Becker, beckert@lerner.udel.edu

8. Symposium: Friday, 10:3011:50 Santa Anita C (Lobby Level)

Assessing PersonEnvironment Fit for Selection

Most employment testing focuses on developing predictor measures that assess individual characteristics identified as critical to successful job performance. In this symposium, we explore issues and potential solutions associated with using assessments of personenvironment fit to predict other important job-outcome criteria (e.g., turnover) and inform selection decisions. 

Christopher E. Sager, HumRRO, Chair 

Chad H. Van Iddekinge, HumRRO, Christopher E. Sager, HumRRO, Expectations and Personality as Moderators of PE Fit Validity

Dan J. Putka, HumRRO, Using Spline Regression Models to Examine PersonEnvironment Fit

Gerald F. Goodwin, U.S. Army Research Institute, Jon J. Fallesen, Center for Army Leadership, Jeffrey L. 
Herman, George Mason University, Marissa L. Shuffler, George Mason University, PersonOccupation Fit in the Army: Impact on Career Decisions

John P. Campbell, University of Minnesota, Discussant

D. Brent Smith, Rice University, Discussant

Submitted by Christopher E. Sager, csager@humrro.org

9. Education Forum: Friday, 10:3011:50 Palos Verdes (Lobby Level)

Educational Training for a Masters Degree in Industrial-Organizational Psychology

Three program directors share their insights and experiences regarding several educational training issues for the masters degree in industrial-organizational psychology. Discussion issues include the content of the psychological core, the content of the I-O curriculum, and the advantages and disadvantages of requiring a thesis and an internship.

Mark S. Nagy, Xavier University, Chair

Brian W. Schrader, Emporia State University, Co-Chair

Mike G. Aamodt, Radford University, Co-Chair

Submitted by Mark S. Nagy, nagyms@xu.edu

10. Symposium: Friday, 10:3011:50 San Fernando (Lobby Level)

New Lenses on Leadership

Emerging theoretical perspectives on leadership take a more dispersed, relational, and interdependent view of leadership processes. Participants share how these perspectives are being explored and tested in settings characterized by team-based work, continuous adaptation, and integration of differences across boundaries.

Cynthia D. McCauley, Center for Creative Leadership, Chair

Judith L. Steed, Center for Creative Leadership, Cynthia D. McCauley, Center for Creative Leadership, Exploration of Leadership Quarterly: Looking for Seeds of Connected Leadership

Craig L. Pearce, Claremont Graduate University, Shared Leadership

Mary Uhl-Bien, University of Central Florida, Russ Marion, Clemson University, Complex Leadership

Bill Drath, Center for Creative Leadership, Relational Leadership

Submitted by Cynthia D. McCauley, mccauley@leaders.ccl.org

11. AcademicPractitioner Collaborative Forum: Friday, 10:3012:20  San Gabriel A (Lobby Level)

Models of AcademicPractitioner Collaboration

Two academicpractitioner teams will discuss their programs of research on group versus individual decision making and on self-presentation processes in job analysis. Each team will describe how it balances the practical needs of the organization with the academicians interest in rigorous experimental research that advances basic theoretical knowledge.

Seymour Adler, Aon Consulting, Chair

Ira T. Kaplan, Hofstra University, Co-Chair

Philip Ferrara, New York State Unified Court System, Co-Chair

William Metlay, Hofstra University, Models of AcademicPractitioner Collaboration

John Leto, Citigroup, Discussant

Michael T. Barriere, Citigroup, Discussant

Submitted by Ira T. Kaplan, ira.kaplan@hofstra.edu

12. Roundtable: Friday, 10:3011:50  San Gabriel B (Lobby Level)

In Search of Talent Management

Talent management is a term used extensively in the popular literature and by many consulting firms populated with I-O psychologists. Clients demand it, but what is talent management and is it distinct from well-researched psychological interventions? Do I-O psychologists bring something unique to talent management and, if so, what?

Robert E. Lewis, Personnel Decisions International, Host

R. J. Heckman, Personnel Decisions International, Co-Host

Kathleen A. Tuzinski, Personnel Decisions International, Co-Host

Submitted by Robert E. Lewis, blewis@PersonnelDecisions.com

13. Education Forum: Friday, 10:3011:50  San Gabriel C (Lobby Level)

New Ways to Create Interactive Learning in the Classroom

This forum explores new ways to make both large and small classrooms more interactive thereby enhancing the learning experience. Presentations include the use of personal response systems, applied research projects, use of Blackboard to create a virtual learning community, and a mock trial to enhance understanding of discrimination law.

Beth G. Chung-Herrera, San Diego State University, Chair

Beth G. Chung-Herrera, San Diego State University, Using the Personal Response System to Engage a Large Class

Grace W. Davis, Marshall University, Aligning Class Activities with Community Services

Kizzy Marie Parks, Florida Tech University, Creating an Interactive Online Community

J. Bruce Tracey, Cornell University, David Sherwyn, Cornell University, Using a Jury Trial to Teach Students Employment Law

Submitted by Beth G. Chung-Herrera, Beth.Chung@sdsu.edu

14. Theoretical Advancement: Friday, 10:3011:50  San Pedro (Lobby Level)

The Conceptualization and Measurement of Adaptive Skill

This theory session presents a highly useful, but greatly underutilized, individual difference and organizational construct: workplace adaptive skill. The theoretical status of adaptive skill is reviewed and two systems for its measurement are discussed, one interview based and the other questionnaire based. Recommendations are given for future research into the construct.

Steven F. Cronshaw, University of Guelph, Chair

Greg A. Chung-Yan, University of Guelph, Discussant

Steven F. Cronshaw, University of Guelph, Discussant

Perng Yih Ong, University of Guelph, Discussant

Dara B. Chappell, University of Guelph, Discussant

Submitted by Steven F. Cronshaw, cronshaw@psy.uoguelph.ca

15. Symposium: Friday, 10:3011:50 Santa Barbara A (Lobby Level)

Contextual Influences on Knowledge Sharing in Technology-Mediated Groups

As organizational groups increasingly make use of technology-mediated communication, researchers and practitioners seek to understand how knowledge sharing behaviors in technology-mediated groups are influenced by the organizational context in which the groups are embedded. The research presented in this symposium advances understanding in this important but relatively underexamined area.

Kathryn M. Bartol, University of Maryland, Chair

N. Sharon Hill, University of Maryland, Co-Chair

Andrea Hollingshead, University of Illinois, Strategic Information Sharing in Computer-Mediated Groups

Bradley J. Alge, Purdue University, Stephen G. Green, Purdue University, David Lehman, Purdue University, Perceived Remoteness and Information Sharing in Virtual Teams

N. Sharon Hill, University of Maryland, Kathryn M. Bartol, University of Maryland, Paul E. Tesluk, University of Maryland, Gosia A. Langa, University of Maryland, The Influence of Face-to-Face Interaction and Organizational Culture on Knowledge Sharing in Computer-Mediated Groups

Bradley L Kirkman, Georgia Institute Technology, Benson Rosen, University of North Carolina, Paul E. Tesluk, University of Maryland, Cristina B. Gibson, University of California-Irvine, The Influence of Team Virtuality, Trust, Technology Support, and Leadership on the Relationship Between Team Training Proficiency and Performance in Virtual Teams

Richard S. Blackburn, University of North Carolina, Stacie A. Furst, Louisiana State University, Benson Rosen, University of North Carolina, Knowledge-Sharing Among HR Professionals: The Role of Virtual Teams

Kathryn M. Bartol, University of Maryland, Discussant

N. Sharon Hill, University of Maryland, Discussant

Submitted by N. Sharon Hill, ns.hill@comcast.net

16. Practitioner Forum: Friday, 10:3011:20 Santa Barbara B (Lobby Level)

Success Factors and Pitfalls in Large-Scale Change Management Initiatives

When embarking on a major change initiative, companies often assume that the issues faced are unique to their situation. This forum challenges this notion by addressing the common success factors and pitfalls experienced by three large companies from diverse industries as they implement sustainable change.

Jennifer Hutcheson, Dell, Inc., Chair

Jennifer Hutcheson, Dell, Inc., Ensuring Success of Change Management Initiatives through Managerial Ownership

Steven J. Robison, The Dow Chemical Company, Implementing Change Effectively at Dow

Rhonda K. Kidwell McGown, Wachovia Corporation, Changing Priorities: Building an Organization Focused on Long-Term Growth and Sustainability

Submitted by Jennifer Hutcheson, jennifer_hutcheson@dell.com

17. AcademicPractitioner Collaborative Forum: Friday, 10:3011:20  Santa Barbara C (Lobby Level)

ONRs Collaboration and Knowledge Management Program: A Successful AcademicPractitioner Alliance

The Office of Naval Research has successfully blended academic and applied work for years. This forum will introduce you to part of 1 program, the Collaboration and Knowledge Management Program that supports 9 universities and 4 nonacademic organizations in the pursuit of improved team decision making in complex, data-rich situations.

Kathleen P. Hess, Aptima, Inc., Chair

Michael P. Letsky, Office of Naval Research, Co-Chair

Kathleen P. Hess, Aptima, Inc., Michael P. Letsky, Office of Naval Research, Norman Warner, Naval Air Systems Command, Paul Keel, MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies, Jared Freeman, Aptima Incorporated, Elizabeth Wroblewski, Naval Air Systems Command, Edith Ackermann, MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies, Orlando J. Olivares, Texas A&M University, ONRs Collaboration and Knowledge Management Program: A Successful AcademicPractitioner Alliance

Norman Warner, Naval Air Systems Command, Discussant

Paul Keel, MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies, Discussant

Submitted by Kathleen P. Hess, khess@aptima.com

18. AcademicPractitioner Collaborative Forum: Friday, 10:3011:20 San Bernardino (Lobby Level)

Predicting Multitasking Performance Using Measures of Ability and Personality

Management of an electric utility power grid requires the ability to manage a variety of tasks simultaneously. This research is designed to determine the usefulness of a synthetic work model to predict training outcomes for electric system supervisors and examine the relative contributions of ability and nonability measures to multitasking.

Mary Ann Hannigan, DTE Energy, Chair

Frederick L. Oswald, Michigan State University, Co-Chair

D. Zachary Hambrick, Michigan State University, Discussant

Submitted by Mary Ann Hannigan, hanniganm@dteenergy.com

19. Symposium: Friday, 10:3011:50 Beaudry A (Lobby Level)

Dispositional Factors in Job Attitudes and Affective Reactions to Work

Dispositional influences on job attitudes have received a great deal of recent attention. However, this research has generally been limited to the effects of positive and negative affectivity on overall job satisfaction. This symposium expands on past research by examining several different dispositions and work-related attitudes.

Terry A. Beehr, Central Michigan University, Chair

Nathan A. Bowling, Central Michigan University, Co-Chair

Haitham A. Khoury, University of South Florida, Angeline Ping Shin Goh, University of South Florida, Valentina Bruk-Lee, University of South Florida, Paul E. Spector, University of South Florida, Beyond the Big Five: A Meta-Analysis of Job Satisfaction and Personality Factors

Nathan A. Bowling, Central Michigan University, Terry A. Beehr, Central Michigan University, Lawrence R. Lepisto, Central Michigan University, Dispositional Approach to Job and Vocational Attitudes: A Longitudinal Analysis

Kevin Miliffe, University of Florida, John D. Kammeyer-Mueller, University of Florida, Timothy A. Judge, University of Florida, Changes in Self-Concept as a Function of Personal and Situational Characteristics

Yochi Cohen-Charash, CUNY, Baruch College, Barry M. Staw, University of CaliforniaBerkeley, How Do Dispositions Affect Job Satisfaction? A Theoretical Model

Edwin A. Locke, University of Maryland, Discussant

Submitted by Nathan A. Bowling, nathan.a.bowling@cmich.edu

20. Practitioner Forum: Friday, 10:3011:50  Beaudry B (Lobby Level)

Test Security and Digital Asset Protection in the Internet Age

This symposium examines three perspectives on Internet-based test security and digital asset protection, including (a) the testing industry perspective, (b) the test publisher perspective, and (c) the risk management perspective. Improved risk management yields higher quality assessment instruments, improved decision making, more jobs for I-O psychologists, and stronger public relations.

John W. Jones, IPAT, Chair

William G. Harris, Association of Test Publishers, Test Security in the Age of Web-Based Testing

David W. Arnold, NCS Pearson, Inc., John W. Jones, IPAT, Legal and Business Strategies for Protecting Publishers Online Testing Assets

Cyndy Fitzgerald, Caveon, Detection of Testing Industry Fraud: Methods of Online Risk Management

Michael M. Harris, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Discussant

Submitted by John W. Jones, jwj@ipat.com

21. Poster Session, 10:3011:20 Pasadena (Lower Level)

Global Diversity


21-1. S. Rains Wallace Dissertation Award Winner:  

A Longitudinal Study of the Relationship Between Racial Diversity and Profitability

This longitudinal research examined the relationship between employee racial diversity and business unit profitability. The initial level of racial diversity was significantly and negatively associated with the rate of change in controllable profit after controlling for the racial diversity of the communities in which the businesses were located.

Joshua M. Sacco, Aon Consulting

21-2. Interaction Effects of Expatriates Parent Company and Foreign Subsidiary Commitments

To respond to Toh and DeNisis (2003) call, we examine host-country national (HCN) subordinates reactions to expatriate managers parent company and foreign subsidiary commitments, using survey data from 153 expatriate managers and 324 HCN subordinates. The findings supported the interaction effects of expatriates parent company and foreign subsidiary commitments.


Riki Takeuchi, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Jeffrey P. Shay, University of Montana

Submitted by Riki Takeuchi, mnrikit@ust.hk

21-3. A Social Exchange Perspective on Expatriation: An Empirical Examination

We apply a social exchange perspective to an expatriate context. We propose and test the synergistic effects of two facets of POS on adjustment. We then examine links between adjustment and commitment, as well as an interactive effect of job performance and affective commitment on early return intentions.

Riki Takeuchi, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Mo Wang, Bowling Green State University

Sophia V. Marinova, University of Maryland

Jing Liang, Shenzhen Women and Children Psychological Education Center

Submitted by Riki Takeuchi, mnrikit@ust.hk

21-4. The Influence of Economic Threat on Attitudes Toward Diversity Policies

Realistic group conflict theory (LeVine & Campbell, 1972) posits that people resist policies that advance out-group members, especially during periods of threat. As expected, an experimental manipulation of economic threat caused White participants to be less supportive both of diversity programs and of diverse organizational employees.

Jennifer L. Knight, Rice University

Michelle (Mikki) Hebl, Rice University

Submitted by Jennifer L. Knight, jknight@rice.edu

21-5. Assessors Perceptions Explaining Ethnic Score Differences in Selection: Dutch Findings

This study examined the explanatory power of assessors perceptions in accounting for differences between the ethnic majority group (N = 10,002) and first and second ethnic minority groups (N = 1,407) in the context of Dutch police officer selection. Results supported assumed-characteristics theory but not complexity-extremity theory.

L. A. L. de Meijer, Erasmus University-Rotterdam

Marise Born, Erasmus University-Rotterdam

Gert Terlouw, Police Academy of The Netherlands

Henk T. Van Der Molen, Erasmus University-Rotterdam

Submitted by L. A. L. de Meijer, demeijer@fsw.eur.nl

21-6. Ethnic Score Differences on Cognitive Ability and Personality: Dutch Findings

Differences between the ethnic majority group and first- and second-generation minority groups were examined on cognitive ability and a personality during Dutch police officer selection. Differences between majorities and first-generation minorities were comparable to North American findings. Differences between majorities and second-generation minorities on cognitive ability were dramatically smaller.

L. A. L. de Meijer, Erasmus University-Rotterdam

Marise Born, Erasmus University-Rotterdam

Gert Terlouw, Police Academy of The Netherlands

Henk T. Van Der Molen, Erasmus University-Rotterdam

Submitted by L. A. L. de Meijer, demeijer@fsw.eur.nl

21-7. How Racial and Positional Cues Affect Initial Perceptions of Leadership

This study contrasted racial stereotypes with a contextual cue to determine their impact on leader identification and perceived competence, leadership capability, and likeability. Although individuals generally recognized those at the head of the table as leaders, individual assessments varied by the targets race, the racial context, and observers social dominance orientation and prejudice.

Derek R. Avery, Saint Josephs University

Morela Hernandez, Duke University

Alexis N. Smith, Tulane University

Michelle (Mikki) Hebl, Rice University

Submitted by Derek R. Avery, davery@sju.edu

21-8. A Goal-Orientation Perspective on Expatriation: An Empirical Examination

We apply a goal-orientation perspective to an expatriate context. The effects of different goal-orientation dimensions on expatriate adjustment processes were proposed and tested. The mediation effects of expatriate adjustment between goal-orientation dimensions and expatriate outcomes, such as job performance and premature return intention, were further examined.

Mo Wang, Bowling Green State University

Jennifer L. Burnfield, Bowling Green State University

Jesse Erdheim, Bowling Green State University

Craig D. Crossley, Bowling Green State University

Submitted by Mo Wang, wangmo@bgnet.bgsu.edu

21-9. Examining Different Types of Work Experience on Expatriate Longitudinal Performance

The nature of intraindividual expatriate performance change over time and previous work experience predictors of such change were examined using a latent growth modeling approach. The latent performance growth approximated learning curves, following power trajectories. Different types of work experience demonstrated different predictive effects across the latent performance growth factors.

Mo Wang, Bowling Green State University

Milton Hakel, Bowling Green State University

L. Jean Whinghter, Bowling Green State University

Fangyi Liao, The Gallup Organization

Jing Liang, Shenzhen Women and Children Psychological Education Center

Submitted by Mo Wang, wangmo@bgnet.bgsu.edu

21-10. Values, Demographics, and Diversity Attitudes in the United Kingdom

The study investigates relationships between values, gender, race, and diversity attitudes. Women, non-Whites, and those scoring high in openness to change and self-transcendence values and low in conservative and self-enhancement values had more positive attitudes. Self-transcendence interacted with race and gender to predict attitudes.

Judy P. Strauss, California State University-Long Beach

Olukemi O. Sawyerr, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Adegoke Oke, Cranfield University

Submitted by Judy P. Strauss, jstrauss@csulb.edu

21-11. Culture Variation and Psychological Contracts in the United States

The relation between culture and psychological contracts in the United States was investigated. Results indicated that individual cultural orientation was differentially related to transactional and relational aspects of the psychological contract. More specifically, individualist values promoted transactional employee obligations, and collectivist values promoted relational employee and employer obligations.

Dana M. Glenn, University of Houston

Lois E. Tetrick, George Mason University

Submitted by Dana M. Glenn, danaglenn29@hotmail.com

21-12. Individual Differences and Racial Prejudice in Performance Evaluation Accuracy

The present study extended previous research on race effects in performance evaluations. Results indicate that prejudiced rater attitudes have a significant effect on rating accuracy. Although no individual difference variables moderated the relationship between prejudiced attitudes and rating accuracy, certain personality variables were significantly related to prejudiced attitudes.

Angela K. Pratt, Wayne State University 

Samuel L. Amelio, Personnel Research Associates

Boris B. Baltes, Wayne State University

Submitted by Angela K. Pratt, apratt@sun.science.wayne.edu

21-13. Anxiety and Experience in Heterosexuals Responses to Gay Coworkers

Study examined participants willingness to partner with a sexual minority coworker on a visible, important, and developmental job assignment. Participants previous contact experiences, intergroup anxiety towards sexual minorities, and job level of the coworker were also examined as influences on their partnering decisions. Results, implications, and future research are discussed.

Corey S. Munoz, University of Georgia

Kecia M. Thomas, University of Georgia

Submitted by Corey S. Munoz, cmunoz@uga.edu

21-14. Gender Composition: A Predictor of Formal Mentoring Processes and Outcomes

This study investigated the impact of gender composition on the success of formal mentoring relationships. One hundred sixty undergraduate freshmen were randomly assigned to junior and senior students in order to receive mentoring designed to reduce attrition. Results indicated that gender composition influenced mentoring functions provided and performance outcomes (GPA).

Charyl Staci Singleton, University of Central Florida

Kimberly A. Smith-Jentsch, University of Central Florida

Alicia Sanchez, Institute for Simulation and Training

Submitted by Kimberly A. Smith-Jentsch, kjentsch@mail.ucf.edu

21-15. An Empirical Test of the Glass Ceiling for Asian Americans

The existence of a longitudinal glass ceiling effect was empirically tested for Asian American scientists and engineers using Latent Growth Curve modeling. A number of variables known to affect career outcomes were controlled for in the analyses. Results found support for a glass ceiling effect for Asian Americans.

Tina T. Chen, Sempra Energy Utilities

James L. Farr, Pennsylvania State University

Submitted by Tina T. Chen, ttchen@semprautilities.com

21-16. The Role of Protege Disability and Competence in Mentoring Relationships

Disability status, disability type, and competence were explored relative to willingness to mentor and perceived competence. Results revealed no significant differences in willingness to mentor and a positive bias towards the disabled regarding perceived competence. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

Andrea B. Kimbrough, University of Georgia

Lillian T. Eby, University of Georgia

Olga N. Aranbayeva, Dial America

Submitted by Andrea B. Kimbrough, amtbrinley@aol.com

21-17. Moderators of the Demographic DiversityUnit Performance Relationship

The diversity/performance relationship was examined in a sample of 820 stores. Racial diversity was adversely related to three measures of store performance. These relationships were moderated by average length of service in the store, store member turnover, leader turnover, and full/part-time status. Results for gender diversity were mixed.

Jeff A. Weekley, Kenexa

Lynn A. McFarland, Clemson University

Amy Cooper Hakim, Office Depot

Bryan C. Hayes, Kenexa

Submitted by Jeff A. Weekley, jeff.weekley@kenexa.com

21-18. Effects of Demographic Differences on Creativity in Virtual Dyads

This study examined whether demographic differences affected virtual dyads creativity. We found a strong negative effect for differences in nationality. Differences in age interacted with team processes (e.g., equal participation by members and process conflict), degree of prior friendship, and differences in technical experience in affecting the dyads creative performance.

Luis L. Martins, Georgia Institute of Technology

Christina E. Shalley, Georgia Institute of Technology

Submitted by Christina E. Shalley, Christina.Shalley@dupree.gatech.edu

21-19. Indexing Diversity Under Missing Data Conditions

Findings from a Monte Carlo simulation show that within-unit diversity is strongly influenced by response rates when data are missing-not-at-random. Under typical missingness conditions, diversity is greatly underestimated. Having scales with more items can help to mitigate the problem. Also, SDWG appears to be a better diversity index than CVWG.

Daniel A. Newman, University of Maryland

Hock-Peng Sin, Pennsylvania State University

Submitted by Hock-Peng Sin, hpsin@psu.edu

21-20. Supervisor Integrity and Supervisory Commitment: A Cultural Investigation

Samples were collected from comparable government agencies in Taiwan (n = 364) and the United States (n = 145). Main findings indicated that supervisor support significantly moderated the relationship between supervisor integrity and supervisory commitment, however, moderating effects were opposite in Taiwan and in the United States.

Ding-Yu Jiang, National Taiwan University

Jean H. Riley, Alliant International University

Bor-Shiuan Cheng, National Taiwan University

Chi-Ying Cheng, University of Michigan

Chin-Kang Jen, National Sun Yat-Sen University

Submitted by Jean H. Riley, jeanhr@san.rr.com

21-21. The Impact of Motivational Predictors on Diversity in Student Selection

The purpose of this study was to examine the prospects for achieving the twin objectives of increased diversity and validity in a college admissions context by supplementing the SAT with motivation-related predictors. Results generally confirm that increased diversity can be achieved through use of motivation-related predictors without compromising validity.

Michael J. Cullen, University of Minnesota

Amy C. Hooper, University of Minnesota

Submitted by Amy C. Hooper, dies0018@umn.edu

21-22. Perceptions of Relational Practices in the Workplace

The present study examined relationally motivated behaviors in the workplace. Working adults (N = 128) completed online surveys containing workplace scenarios and rated how effective/submissive they perceived the targets behaviors. Overall, participants rated relationally motivated behaviors as ineffective and submissive; however, targets were not rated differentially based on gender.

Jessica H. Carlson, Western New England College

Submitted by Jessica H. Carlson, JessCar1@yahoo.com

21-23. Reducing the Ill Effects of Thought Suppression Through Structured Interviews

This research tested the influence of thought suppression and interview structure on interview outcomes. Results demonstrate that interviewers in unstructured interviews were more biased towards minority applicants when instructed to not think about race during the interview than a control group. Results have legal and future research implications.

Juan Madera, Rice University

Michelle (Mikki) Hebl, Rice University

Submitted by Juan Madera, jmadera@rice.edu

21-24. Procedural Justice and Performance Evaluations in French and American Organizations

67 American and 70 French employees participated in a survey examining fairness perceptions for performance evaluations. Findings indicated that correlations between the use of voice in evaluations and overall fairness perceptions were significantly higher for Americans than French. Relative emphasis of other procedural justice rules in evaluations was also presented.

Katy Mohler Fodchuk, Old Dominion University

Submitted by Katy Mohler Fodchuk, kfodc001@odu.edu

21-25. Discrimination Against Asian Americans: How do Model Minorities Fare?

Participants rated an employees performance when ethnic background, performance level, and job type were manipulated. Results indicate that the high-performing Asian employee was discriminated against. Moreover, endorsement of the model-minority stereotype was associated with lower ratings of the Asian employee. Results were interpreted according to terror management theory.

Genie Chartier, University of Central Florida

Barbara A. Fritzsche, University of Central Florida

Submitted by Genie Chartier, geniechartier@cfl.rr.com

21-26. Assessing Dissimilarity From the Group: Evidence From Computer Simulations

Research examining the effects of diversity on individuals has provided somewhat equivocal results. Our computer simulation suggests, however, such effects are likely to be underestimated to the extent that researchers calculate dissimilarity scores based on partial (rather than complete) group membership data, particularly if survey response rates are low.

Natalie J. Allen, University of Western Ontario

David Stanley, University of Guelph

Helen Williams, University of Leeds

Sarah J. Irwin, University of Western Ontario

Submitted by Natalie J. Allen, nallen@uwo.ca

21-27. Student Status and Age Effects on Sexual Harassment Perceptions

The present study sought to determine whether students and nonstudents (employed adults) differed in their perceptions of sexual harassment, and if so, what variables accounted for this difference. Results indicate that the student status effect is explained by age, which in turn is partially mediated by hostile sexism.

Dawn Ohse, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Margaret S. Stockdale, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Submitted by Margaret S. Stockdale, PStock@siu.edu

21-28. The Relationship Between Culture and Labor/Employment Laws Across Fifty-Seven Countries

We present results from the first study to examine the relationship between national culture and labor and employment law across a wide range of countries. Our results suggest that the design and implementation of employment laws are influenced by the cultural environment. We discuss implications for multinational companies.

Sara M. Turken, Cornell University

Lisa H. Nishii, Cornell University

Submitted by Lisa H. Nishii, lhn5@cornell.edu

21-29. An Integrated Model of Cross-Cultural Training

This paper presents a theoretical model of cross-cultural training that incorporates principles from general training with the unique needs of cross-cultural training. The resulting model identifies important issues that need to be taken into account to deliver successful cross-cultural training, with a particular emphasis on the needs assessment stage.

Anu Ramesh, University of Maryland

Submitted by Anu Ramesh, aramesh@psyc.umd.edu

21-30. The Effect of Culture Distance on Expatriate Adjustment: A Meta-Analysis

A meta-analysis was conducted to examine the impact of culture distance on expatriate adjustment. As hypothesized, the results showed negative effects of culture distance on adjustment. The moderating effect of predictor and criterion measures (subjective/objective, work/nonwork) and assignment duration underscore the importance of measurement and longitudinal orientation in expatriation research.

Laura Galarza, University of Puerto Rico

Submitted by Laura Galarza, lgalarza@adelphia.net

22. Community of Interests: Friday, 10:3011:20 Pasadena (Lower Level)

PO Fit

Participants can come and go as they like, and chat with others with similar interests.


23. Interactive Posters: Friday, 10:3011:20 Los Feliz (Lobby Level)

Training in Alternative Delivery Modes


23-1. A Meta-Analytic Review of Behavior Modeling Training

A meta-analysis of 117 studies was conducted to assess the effects of behavior modeling training (BMT) on six training outcomes. Analyses included an assessment of the stability of BMT effects over time, as well as associations between training effect sizes and particular characteristics of BMT design.

Paul J. Taylor, University of Waikato 

Darlene F. Russ-Eft, Oregon State University

Daniel W. L. Chan, Chinese University of Hong Kong

Submitted by Paul J. Taylor, ptaylor@waikato.ac.nz

23-2. On-the-Job Training: A Review for Researchers and Practitioners

Over 60% of training is estimated to occur on the job. This paper provides researchers and practitioners with an understanding of what on-the-job (OJT) training is, its theoretical basis, what the research says about OJT, and what we still need to know about this important instructional technique.

Renee Eileen DeRouin, University of Central Florida

Tiffany J. Parrish, University of Central Florida

Eduardo Salas, University of Central Florida

Submitted by Renee Eileen DeRouin, renee@derouin.com

23-3. Case Features and Individual Attributes in Case-Based Training

Compares principle-based and case-based training paradigms on learning and application of training principles. The effect of case features, intelligence, and goal orientation are also examined. Results indicate that case studies are beneficial to learning but can distract from applying knowledge effectively. Case reflection and learning orientation are also beneficial.

Matthew T. Allen, University of Oklahoma

Mary Shane Connelly, University of Oklahoma

Submitted by Matthew T. Allen, mattallen@ou.edu

23-4. Frame-of-Reference Training: More Accurate Ratings, but Accurate Enough?

The Angoff method was used to establish cutoff scores for evaluating competence in a frame-of-reference (FOR) training program. Ten SMEs provided Angoff judgments on the difficulty of rating behaviors in video- and written-based scenarios. Results provided reliability and accuracy evidence for the Angoff method in a FOR training context.

Randall H. Lucius, APT, Inc.

Michael Lippstreu, Georgia Institute of Technology

Darin Wiechmann, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company

Submitted by Randall H. Lucius, rlucius@appliedpsych.com


24. Special Event: Friday, 11:0011:50 Avalon (Level 3)

Distinguished Teaching Contributions Award: Dont Be Foolish

I will discuss the transformation from being a good teacher to becoming a great teacher, the relative importance of teaching and published research in building an academic career, and the meaning of teaching over the lifespan of an individual.

Patrick R. Powaser, Oxy Inc., Chair

Paul M. Muchinsky, University of North Carolina-Greensboro, Presenter


25. Symposium: Friday, 11:3012:50 Santa Barbara B (Lobby Level)

Work Motivation: A Changing of the Guard for Motivational Processes

Researchers have proposed that individual inputs and contextual factors influence performance via motivational and self-regulatory processes. This session presents four papers that offer substantial progress in our understanding of work motivation by incorporating multiple motivational constructs/processes (e.g., regulatory focus, state-goal orientation) to further our understanding of goal striving and performance.

J. Craig Wallace, Tulane University, Chair

Ronald S. Landis, Tulane University, Co-Chair

James M. Diefendorff, University of Colorado-Denver, Erin M. Richard, Louisiana State University, Chet Robie, Wilfrid Laurier University, Motivational Traits and Performance: The Mediating Role of Daily Self-Regulation

B. Tyson Breland, Marriott International, John J. Donovan, Virginia Tech, The Role of State-Goal Orientation in the Process of Goal Establishment and Task Performance

Leifur Geir Hafsteinsson, Reykjavik University, John J. Donovan, Virginia Tech, The Interactive Effects of Achievement Goals and Task Complexity on Effort, Mental Focus, and Enjoyment

J. Craig Wallace, Tulane University, Gilad Chen, Texas A&M University, Ruth Kanfer, Georgia Institute of Technology, Regulatory Focus in the Workplace

Eric D. Heggestad, Colorado State University, Discussant

Submitted by J. Craig Wallace, jwallace@tulane.edu

26. Panel Discussion: Friday, 11:3012:50 Santa Barbara C (Lobby Level)

Traditional Assessment Centers Versus Technology-Enhanced Assessments: Pros and Cons

This panel will address the real and hoped-for benefits of repositioning the assessment center into a virtual environment. Wins and losses of traditional and technology-enhanced assessments will be discussed from the perspectives of service provider, assessment designer and program manager, assessor and feedback provider, and client end-user.

Joseph L. Moses, Applied Research Corporation, Chair

Sandra Hartog, Sandra Hartog & Associates, Panelist

Lynn Collins, Sandra Hartog & Associates, Panelist

Janis M. Ward, J. M. Ward Consulting, Panelist

Diane P. Brennan, UBS Wealth Management, Panelist

Submitted by Sandra Hartog, shartog@sandrahartogassoc.com

27. Symposium: Friday, 11:3012:50 San Bernardino (Lobby Level)

Advances in Meta-Analysis: New Approaches to Artifact Correction

This symposium will cover recent advances in methods for correcting statistical artifacts when conducting a meta-analysis. Corrections for range restriction, measurement error, and heterogeneity of variances will be discussed.

Scott B. Morris, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chair

Frederick L. Oswald, Michigan State University, Patrick D. Converse, Michigan State University, Correcting for Reliability and Range Restriction in Meta-Analysis

Frank L. Schmidt, University of Iowa, Huy Le, HumRRO, Implications of Indirect Range Restriction for Meta-Analysis Methods

Michael T. Brannick, University of South Florida, Estimating Reliability in Primary Research

Scott B. Morris, Illinois Institute of Technology, Estimating the Standardized Mean Change with Heterogeneous Variance

Nambury S. Raju, Illinois Institute of Technology, Discussant

Submitted by Scott B. Morris, scott.morris@iit.edu

28. Poster Session: Friday, 11:3012:20 Pasadena (Lower Level)

Training, Legal, Practice Issues


28-1. An Investigation of Individual and Contextual Factors Influencing Training Variables

This study models training motivation and learning from individual and contextual perspectives. Participants were 250 business students in a remedial training class. Self-efficacy was found to correlate with learning partly through the mediation of training motivation. Interactional justice experienced in the previous class moderated the effect of self-efficacy on motivation.

Aichia Chuang, National Taiwan University

Wen-Chih Liao, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology

Wei-Tao Tai, Chihlee Institute of Technology

Submitted by Aichia Chuang, achuang@ba.ntust.edu.tw

28-2. The Legal Standards of Sexual Harassment

This study investigated whether individuals define different behavioral scenarios as harassing from the reasonable person and reasonable victim perspectives. It appears the victim standard lowers the threshold of unacceptable workplace behavior and gender serves as a moderator for the standards and ambiguous behavior. Future research and limitations are also provided.

Elizabeth McChrystal, Florida Institute of Technology

Arthur Gutman, Florida Institute of Technology

Submitted by Elizabeth McChrystal, lizmcchrystal@hotmail.com

28-3. Sexual Harassment Legal Standards: Employees Understanding of Sexual Harassment Law

The purpose of this study is to empirically investigate employees knowledge of sexual harassment law. The results suggest that there is confusion over the legal definition of sexual harassment and the behaviors that constitute sexual harassment. Practical implications and future research are also provided.

Elizabeth McChrystal, Florida Institute of Technology

Arthur Gutman, Florida Institute of Technology

Submitted by Elizabeth McChrystal, lizmcchrystal@hotmail.com

28-4. Evaluating Diversity Training: Effects of Trainer Characteristics and Training Focus

The present study developed an integrated model for diversity training evaluation. The results show that diversity training can be effective in terms of modifying trainees reactions, learning, and transfer outcomes and can be further enhanced by the design features, such as the trainer characteristics and the training focus.

Courtney L. Holladay, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center

Submitted by Courtney L. Holladay, CLHolladay@mdanderson.org

28-5. A Review of Cognitive Ability Testing Court Decisions Since 1991

A review of 19912004 Appellate and District Court cognitive ability testing cases indicated that, although cognitive tests are likely to result in race-based adverse impact, organizations that utilize professionally developed tests that are validated and set cutoff scores supported by the validity study are likely to fare well in court.

Leslie Charles Pedigo, Western Kentucky University

Elizabeth L. Shoenfelt, Western Kentucky University

Submitted by Elizabeth L. Shoenfelt,  betsy.shoenfelt@wku.edu    


28-6. Realistic Job Previews in the Classroom: Application of Discrepancy Theory

The discrepancy theory of job satisfaction was successfully extended to the college classroom environment. High discrepancies were significantly related to lower performance, satisfaction, motivation, absenteeism, withdrawal, and citizenship behaviors. Implications for classroom instruction and the need for realistic job previews are discussed.

Stefani L. Yorges, West Chester University

Arvid Bloom, West Chester University

Kristin Difonzo, West Chester University

Submitted by Stefani L. Yorges, syorges@wcupa.edu

28-7. Gender Effects in Computer-Based Research

Researchers draw conclusions about psychological constructs relevant to work from studies involving computer-based tasks. Gender effects, which are frequently found in research using such tasks, may affect the conclusions drawn. We examined a framework involving task framing, task medium, and gender schemas. We found effects for gender and task characteristics.

Charlene K. Stokes, Wright State University

Debra Steele-Johnson, Wright State University

Anupama Narayan, Wright State University

Paul R. Heintz, Wright State University

Daniel H. Schwartz, Wright State University

Submitted by Charlene K. Stokes, stokes.10@wright.edu

28-8. Successful Aging: Instrumentality of Self-Directed Development Strategies

Two studies were conducted to identify successful aging strategies at work and the utility of these strategies in predicting perceived success. Results suggest that continuous learning and security strategies were predictive of success above and beyond important personal and organizational characteristics. Implications for theory and application are also discussed.

Sean Robson, Radford University

Robert O. Hansson, University of Tulsa

Submitted by Sean Robson, smrobson@radford.edu

28-9. Responses to Feedback and Social Support in a Training Environment

The effects of feedback and social support were tested in a training setting. Results provide partial support for the relational devaluation model (OFarrell, 2004): Negative feedback increases negative affect and decreases self-efficacy. Additional effects on self-efficacy and implications for approaches to training are discussed.

Pamela Schultz, ePredix

Kimberly J. OFarrell, Minnesota State University-Mankato

Submitted by Pamela Schultz, pam.schultz@epredix.com

28-10. Differential Effects of Pretraining Influences on Readiness to Change

We examined pretraining influences on readiness to change under nonoptimal training conditions. Results indicated that choice to attend, social support, and motivation to learn had differential effects on 4 dimensions of readiness to change. Effects were moderated by age. Results provide evidence regarding increasing training effectiveness under adverse training conditions.

Anupama Narayan, Wright State University

Debra Steele-Johnson, Wright State University

Kristen M. Delgado, Wright State University

Phyllis A. Cole, Wright State University

Submitted by Anupama Narayan, narayan.3@wright.edu

28-11. Age, Prior Knowledge, Ability, and Learning: Implications for Training Design

We investigated the relationship between age, prior knowledge, cognitive ability, and learning for training across two domains, health and technology. Results indicate that prior knowledge and ability were important predictors of knowledge acquisition for both domains. The effect of age on learning was mediated through experience, prior knowledge, and ability.

Margaret E. Beier, Rice University 

Phillip L. Ackerman, Georgia Institute of Technology

Submitted by Margaret E. Beier, beier@rice.edu

28-12. Individual and Jury Perceptions of Sexual Harassment: Effects of Intoxication

Female jurors were more likely to perceive sexual harassment. Intoxicated victims were less likely to be perceived victims of sexual harassment. An intoxicated perpetrator was less likely than a sober one to be found guilty. Instructions reduced the biasing affect of intoxication information for jury decisions but not individual decisions.

Elizabeth L. Shoenfelt, Western Kentucky University

Kathleen E. Nickel, Western Kentucky University

Submitted by Elizabeth L. Shoenfelt, betsy.shoenfelt@wku.edu

28-13. Improving the Productivity of Organizational Interventions Through Proactive Measures

This study examines the moderating effect of prior resolution attempts (PR) among prior organizational problems (PP) and performance gain (PG) following an intervention. Results showed a significant main effect only for PP. A significant interaction was found, such that when PP were high, PG improved with increased amounts of PR.

Nic Bencaz, University of Central Florida

Deborah DiazGranados, University of Central Florida

Patrick J. Rosopa, University of Central Florida

Robert D. Pritchard, University of Central Florida

Submitted by Nic Bencaz, nicbencaz23@hotmail.com

28-14. Psychometric Properties of the Reidenbach-Robin (1990) Multidimensional Ethics Scale (MES)

Psychometric properties of the 8- and 30-item versions of the Multidimensional Ethics Scale were examined. Factor analyses failed to support the hypothesized 3- and 5-factor structures, revealing a general factor; item response theory analyses using Samejimas (1969) model suggested developing a short-form based on a different subset of items.

Joan M. McMahon, Christopher Newport University

Robert J. Harvey, Virginia Tech

Submitted by Robert J. Harvey, rj@pstc.com

28-15. Ranking of the U.S. I-O Graduate Programs

The current study is an update of the Gibby et al. (2002) study, which ranked I-O programs on publication productivity. Preliminary results indicate that in the last few years research productivity of some programs increased, others decreased, while some remained relatively stable.

Ludmila Zhdanova, Wayne State University

James LeBreton, Wayne State University

Malissa Carpenter, Wayne State University

Submitted by Ludmila Zhdanova, lucia@wayne.edu

28-16. Role of the Context and the Individual in Predicting Training

186 employees were surveyed on individual dimensions (goal orientation, self-efficacy) and contextual factors (supervisor and peer support), related to pretraining motivation as proximal training outcome and connected to skill transfer. Results indicate that mastery-approach goal orientation was the major predictor of training motivation, followed by training self-efficacy and peer support.

Dan S. Chiaburu, Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority

Sophia V. Marinova, University of Maryland

Submitted by Sophia V. Marinova, smarinov@rhsmith.umd.edu

28-17. Funny Math, Serious Misinterpretation: Zenger and Folkmam (2002) on Leadership

This paper refutes the claims of Zenger and Folkman (2002) that (a) leadership effectiveness is cubically related to organizational outcomes, (b) great leaders need have strengths in only 5 areas, (c) 16 competencies distinguish good from poor leaders, and (d) leaders can improve one competency by developing another.
Steven R. Burnkrant, U.S. Office of Personnel Management

Submitted by Steven R. Burnkrant, Steve.Burnkrant@opm.gov

28-18. Stigma-Induced Self-Fulfilling Prophecies in Training Interactions

This study identifies stigma as a potential precursor to a self-fulfilling prophecy in training interactions. Overall, the results suggest that trainer expectations can be influenced by stereotypes they hold about trainee group membership, thus undermining training program goals of providing all employees with the skills necessary to perform their job. Jenessa Shapiro, Arizona State University

Eden B. King, Rice University

Miguel A. Quinones, University of Arizona

Submitted by Jenessa Shapiro, jenessa@asu.edu

28-19. Work Smarter, Not Harder: Applying ACT-R to Training Research

Training research has many issues that must be addressed when designing effective programs. Dealing with these issues, though, usually requires a great deal of material resources. We illustrate how ACT-R, a computational cognitive model, can be used to research issues in training much more efficiently and effectively.

Krista L. Langkamer, George Mason University

Raj M. Ratwani, George Mason University

Submitted by Krista L. Langkamer, klangkam@gmu.edu

28-20. A Case-Based Approach to Developing Leadership

Tests the impact of case content and structure features on the acquisition and transfer of leadership skills. Results show that training using cases is most effective when case content and structure features are present. Results have implications for the development and utilization of cases in training.

Matthew T. Allen, University of Oklahoma

Ethan P. Waples, University of Oklahoma

Mary Shane Connelly, University of Oklahoma

Submitted by Matthew T. Allen, mattallen@ou.edu

28-21. Measuring Sexual Harassment of Adolescents in Early Labor Force Experience

This research investigated whether the Sexual Experiences Questionnaire (SEQ) would be applicable to adolescents in the workforce. The SEQ was found to be stable and psychometrically sound, with the same four dimensions (sexist hostility, sexual hostility, unwanted sexual attention, and sexual coercion) as those emerging from administrations to adult workers.

Karen L. Harris, Western Illinois University

Robert C. Intrieri, Western Illinois University

Dennis R. Papini, Middle Tennessee State University

Submitted by Karen L. Harris, K-Harris@wiu.edu

28-22. Complex Nonmotor Skill Acquisition, Retention, Transfer, and Reacquisition

This study investigated the comparative effectiveness of massed and distributed practice schedules on complex nonmotor skill acquisition, retention, transfer, and reacquisition using a complex command-and-control task. Our results indicated that the massed protocol resulted in higher performance on acquisition but displayed greater skill loss than the distributed protocol.

Winfred Arthur, Texas A&M University

Anton J. Villado, Texas A&M University

Paul R. Boatman, University of Oklahoma

Alok Bhupatkar, Texas A&M University

Eric A. Day, University of Oklahoma

Submitted by Anton J. Villado, antonvillado@tamu.edu

28-23. Does Capturing Web-Based Training Data Adversely Affect e-Learners?

This experiment examined how the awareness that training activities are electronically monitored affects e-learners. Results revealed that monitoring caused changes in heart-rate variability, reflecting increased mental workload. In addition, e-learners viewed the training more negatively when they were monitored. There was not strong evidence to indicate that monitoring obstructed skill attainment.

Jeff Sebastianelli, East Carolina University

Lori Foster Thompson, North Carolina State University

Nicholas P. Murray, East Carolina University

Submitted by Lori Foster Thompson, lfthompson@ncsu.edu

28-24. Ethical Climate in the Role of Stressor

Ethical climate, typically studied as an antecedent of decision making, is posited to also act as a stressor, possibly mediated by job attitudes. Results supported the notion that employees in organizations with strong ethical climates experience less strain and that this relation is mediated by job attitudes.

Kristina Renee Miller, University of Houston

Christiane Spitzmueller, University of Houston

Submitted by Kristina Renee Miller, krmiller@mail.uh.edu  


28-25. Constructivism in Training: A Comparison of Two Interactive Training Tools

This paper describes trends in research on educational technology and presents these trends in the context of two interactive training prototypes developed for military leaders. In addition, this paper presents research on the effectiveness of these prototypes, as well as lessons learned about designing interactive training tools.

Michelle Zbylut, U.S. Army Research Institute

Jason N. Ward, Kansas State University

Jeffrey D. Mark, Kansas State University

Submitted by Michelle Zbylut, michelle.zbylut@leavenworth.army.mil

28-26. Mental Models and Collaborative Learning With a More Experienced Partner

We demonstrated how collaborative learning with a more experienced partner was more effective than individual training but only for trainees whose mental models prior to collaboration were similar to their partners mental models. Mental model similarity was positively related to individual learning through the mediating role of collaborative performance.

Vanessa Kowollik, University of Oklahoma

Eric A. Day, University of Oklahoma

Jazmine Espejo, University of Oklahoma

Lauren E. McEntire, University of Oklahoma

Paul R. Boatman, University of Oklahoma

Submitted by Jazmine Espejo, jespejo@psychology.ou.edu

28-27. The Effects of Rotational Leadership Development Programs on Employee Retention

This study examined the effect of participation in a rotational leadership development program on employee retention. Data on 113 employees in a Fortune 100 company revealed that turnover intentions increased significantly upon graduation from the rotational program. This finding could be partially explained by differences in affective and normative commitment.

Bradford S. Bell, Cornell University

Charles Tyler, IBM

Submitted by Bradford S. Bell, bb92@cornell.edu

28-28. A Longitudinal Quasi-Experiment on the Impact of Executive Coaching

We utilized a quasi-experimental pretest/posttest design to determine the effectiveness of an executive coaching program. Comparisons between the experimental group utilizing executive coaches to the control group indicated that those individuals supported by an executive coach had significantly more positive results including work performance.

Toby M. Egan, Texas A&M University

Zhaoli Song, National University of Singapore

Submitted by Zhaoli Song, zsong@csom.umn.edu

28-29. Age Effects on Continuous Learning of Unemployed Individuals

The study examined age, work experiences, and situational constraints as predictors of continuous learning among unemployed job seekers. Age was positively related to continuous learning. Work experiences and social support affected continuous learning of younger rather than of older individuals. The results demonstrated the importance of a lifespan perspective.

Cornelia Niessen, Technical University of Braunschweig

Submitted by Cornelia Niessen, cornelia.niessen@uni-konstanz.de

28-30. Strategies in Work: The Role of Individual and Situational Factors

The study investigated the relationship of motivation to learn, self-efficacy, perceived climate for learning, and social support with six measures of learning strategies in a sample of 742 employees. The variables explained significant variance in the measures. The findings highlight the important role of motivation to learn and supervisory support.

Thomas N. Garavan, University of Limerick

Ronan Carbery, University of Limerick

Carole Hogan, Carole Hogan Associates

Submitted by Ronan Carbery, ronan.carbery@ul.ie

28-28. A Longitudinal Quasi-Experiment on the Impact of Executive Coaching

We utilized a quasi-experimental pretest/posttest design to determine the effectiveness of an executive coaching program. Comparisons between the experimental group utilizing executive coaches to the control group indicated that those individuals supported by an executive coach had significantly more positive results including work performance.

Toby M. Egan, Texas A&M University

Zhaoli Song, National University of Singapore

Submitted by Zhaoli Song, zsong@csom.umn.edu

28-29. Age Effects on Continuous Learning of Unemployed Individuals

The study examined age, work experiences, and situational constraints as predictors of continuous learning among unemployed job seekers. Age was positively related to continuous learning. Work experiences and social support affected continuous learning of younger rather than of older individuals. The results demonstrated the importance of a lifespan perspective.

Cornelia Niessen, Technical University of Braunschweig

Submitted by Cornelia Niessen, cornelia.niessen@uni-konstanz.de   

28-30. Strategies in Work: The Role of Individual and Situational Factors

The study investigated the relationship of motivation to learn, self-efficacy, perceived climate for learning, and social support with six measures of learning strategies in a sample of 742 employees. The variables explained significant variance in the measures. The findings highlight the important role of motivation to learn and supervisory support.

Thomas N. Garavan, University of Limerick

Ronan Carbery, University of Limerick

Carole Hogan, Carole Hogan Associates

Submitted by Ronan Carbery, ronan.carbery@ul.ie

29. Community of Interests: Friday, 11:3012:20  Pasadena (Lower Level)

Incivility at Work

Participants can come and go as they like, and chat with others with similar interests.


30. Interactive Posters: Friday, 11:3012:20 Los Feliz (Lobby Level)

Faking and Assessment


30-1. Factors Related to Faking Ability: A Structural Equation Model Application

Ability to fake the Big Five personality dimensions was defined using a structural equation model. Faking ability was positively related to cognitive ability, emotional intelligence, and integrity and was negatively related to social desirability. It was not related to any of the Big Five dimensions after controlling for cognitive ability.

Lyndsay Wrensen, University of Tennessee-Chattanooga

Michael Biderman, University of Tennessee-Chattanooga

Submitted by Michael Biderman, Michael-Biderman@utc.edu

30-2. Faking and the Validity of Personality: A Monte Carlo Investigation

The current paper reports the findings from a Monte Carlo investigation examining the impact of faking on validity coefficients. Three faking parameters were manipulated (magnitude, variability, and proportion) and the impact of these parameters on the validity of personality alone and personality used in combination with cognitive ability was examined.

Shawn Komar, University of Waterloo

Jennifer Theakston, University of Waterloo

Douglas J. Brown, University of Waterloo

Chet Robie, Wilfrid Laurier University

Submitted by Douglas J. Brown, djbrown@watarts.uwaterloo.ca

30-3. Antecedents of Faking Personality Selection Measures: Cognitive Ability and Self-Monitoring

This study investigated the degree to which intellectual ability and self-monitoring influenced the response distortion of personality selection measures. Neither cognitive ability nor self-monitoring had a significant effect on faking. Cognitive ability and self-monitoring did not interact in their effect on faking.

Tina Malm, Florida Institute of Technology

Submitted by Tina Malm, malti77@yahoo.com

30-4. Faking and Self-Report Personality Assessments: Replication, Continuation, and Exploration

Individuals instructed to fake were dramatically overrepresented atop factor score distributions both between and within groups in a test-retest situation. Individual differences in creating socially desirable impressions were evident though an attempt to isolate knowledge of the 5-factor model as one such individual difference was not successful.

Chris S. Winkelspecht, Auburn University

Adrian Thomas, Auburn University

Philip M. Lewis, Auburn University

Submitted by Chris S. Winkelspecht, winke01@auburn.edu



Program Table of Contents