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Thursday Theme Track


Bringing I-O Innovations to Life: Making Our Work Stick

Participants who attend the full day of Theme Track programming are eligible for 5.5 CE credits for psychology purposes. This session will appeal to practitioners and academics at all levels. There is no additional cost to attend beyond the cost of basic conference registration. SIOP is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. SIOP maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

10:30-11:50am Theme Track Kickoff/External Innovation Perspective
12:00-12:30pm Lunch Break
12:30-1:20pm The Intersection of Research/Practice: Effectively Using Partnerships So Research Sticks
1:30-2:50pm Promoting Innovation: Interventions with High-Impact Branding
3:00-3:30pm Coffee Break
3:30-4:20pm  Storytelling: I-O as Comedy, Tragedy & Theater of the Absurd


4:30-5:50pm

The Sweet-Spot for Organizational Interventions: Superglue or Teflon

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Based on the content of the Theme Track, I am able to:

  1. Summarize the personal characteristics and methods associated with effectively implementing new and recurrent corporate interventions.
  2. Create partnerships involving both scientists and practitioners that result in impactful interventions, programs, and systems.
  3. Explain how branding an I-O or HR intervention and creating a broadly visible campaign can impact the success and staying power of the initiative.
  4. Describe how to build and brand I-O initiatives that are successful and sustainable over time.
  5. Describe the factors to consider when determining how to make an organizational intervention sustainable (one that will "stick").

Session 1 – Theme Track Kickoff/External Innovation Perspective (80 minutes; Invited Speaker Abbie Griffin)

Description

This session will include an overall introduction to the Theme Track (15-20 minutes) followed by a talk by invited speaker Abbie Griffin (60 minutes) on the topic of Bringing I-O Innovations to Life: Making Our Work Stick. The introduction will overview the day’s sessions, including learning objectives and how/why the sessions are sequenced as they are, with the goal of strongly encouraging full-day attendance.

Dr. Griffin is the Royal L. Garff Endowed Chair in Marketing at the David Eccles School of Business at the University of Utah. Her speech will incorporate two focus areas drawn from innovation research and her recent book, “Serial Innovators: How Individuals Create and Deliver Breakthrough Innovations in Mature Firms”– first, a Focus on the Customer. Rather than creating interventions, products, services around what we think is interesting or the “hot topic,” spend time understanding the customer before designing an innovation. What is it that they do every day and what would make their job easier? What, if we developed it, would it be a “no-brainer” for people to use? Second, a Focus on Execution. Too often people focus on the ideation part of innovation, brainstorming great ideas and getting excited about the possibilities. The hard work of innovation comes in the execution part; making a business plan, piloting, quick failure, and then moving through to execution.

Dr. Griffin’s speech will serve as a foundation for the remainder of the day by framing questions of what I-O psychology can learn from an external, well-researched viewpoint on innovation execution. What does this look like for I-Os? What can we do to make sure that we aren’t just coming up with good ideas, but are connected enough in our organizations that we can make sure that a solid solution moves through the full process to implementation and sustainability?

Abstract

I-O academics and practitioners frequently seek to create new breakthroughs in interventions that will have a lasting impact on organizations. This session brings research from outside the I-O field to spur our innovative thinking, particularly around focusing on the customer and focusing on execution.

Presenters

Introduction – Evan Sinar
Invited Speaker – Abbie Griffin, University of Utah

Abbie Griffin holds the Royal L. Garff Endowed Chair in Marketing at the David Eccles School of Business at the University of Utah, where she teaches the 1st-year core MBA Marketing Management course and MBA second year marketing electives. Professor Griffin’s research investigates means for measuring and improving the process of new product development. Her research has been published in Marketing Science, Journal of Marketing Research, Management Science, and the Journal of Product Innovation Management among other journals. Her 1993 article the “Voice of the Customer” was awarded both the Frank M. Bass Dissertation Paper Award and the John D.C. Little Best Paper Award by INForms. She was on the Board of Directors of Navistar International, a $13 billion manufacturer of diesel engines and trucks from 1998 – 2009, and was the editor of the Journal of Product Innovation Management, the leading academic journal in the areas of product and technology development from 1998 - 2003. Prof. Griffin is an avid quilter, hiker, and swimmer.


 

Session 2 – The Intersection of Research/Practice: Effectively Using Partnerships So Research Sticks (50 minutes; Panel Format)

Description

An integral part of I-O psychology is the application of scientific principles into workplace practices. Successful science-practice integration stems from the ability for academics and practitioners to effectively communicate with each other and provide mutually beneficial information. The goal of this session is to bring together a number of panelists who have prior experience successfully leveraging academic-practitioner relationships, with a focus on those that have culminated in “sticky” interventions, programs, and systems. Example topics that may be discussed in the session include:

  • What can academics can do to make their research more usable?
  • What is the best way for an academic to approach an organization to form a partnership?
  • What are the biggest challenges you have faced in your partnerships? Most rewarding experiences?
  • What are the best practices for practitioners aiming to integrate findings from the academic literature?
  • As a practitioner, what opportunities have you had to inform research conducted by academics?

Abstract

Successful science-practice integration stems from the ability for academics and practitioners to effectively communicate and provide mutually beneficial information. The goal of this session is to bring together panelists who have prior experience successfully leveraging academic-practitioner relationships, focusing on those that have culminated in “sticky” interventions, programs, and systems.

Presenters

  • Sam Hunter – Penn State University
  • Cindy McCauley – Center for Creative Leadership
  • Rod McCloy – HumRRO
  • Karen Paul – 3M
  • Roni Reiter-Palmon – University of Nebraska

Session Coordinators: Kristen Shockley & Emily Stehura


Session 3 – Promoting Innovation: Interventions with High-Impact Branding (80 minutes; IGNITE Format)

Description

This session will use the highly-popular and engaging IGNITE format (10 presenters; 20 automatically-advancing slides in 5 minutes) used for several SIOP sessions over the past 2 years to provide clear, fast-paced, and practice examples of how experts have created a broadly visible campaign around an initiative while addressing:

  • The challenge/problem being confronted
  • The vision of how things will be once the challenge/problem has been addressed and the value/benefit it will add to the group/organization
  • Creating an initiative that is strong enough and meaningful enough that it takes on its own life and identify within an organization; everybody “knows it” and “gets it”
  • Creating something that works, is efficient, and isn’t a mystery

Presenters will also share how they have associated their initiatives with something easily recognizable – this could be a logo (e.g., a lightning bolt) or a catchy name (e.g., next generation leadership development/ training 2.0, etc.). They will also discuss targeting messages to various audience groups (who needs to know what – at what level of detail) in language the is easily understood; presenting it in a way that just makes sense and can easily be explained to new people, so that the audience can articulate why the initiative is critical. The session lends itself very well to high-energy and amusing presentations – to ensure this, we are also planning to include a particularly humorous presentation in the middle of the session.

Abstract

Presenters engage the audience with 5 minutes and 20 automatically progressing slides to share experiences creating a broadly visible campaign around an I-O or HR intervention, sharing the what’s and how’s of branding an initiative that is recognizable and meaningful enough to take on its own identity within an organization.

Presenters

  • Jason Taylor – PeopleAnswers
  • David Oliver – PepsiCo
  • Melissa Brittain – Center for Army Leadership
  • Amy Grubb – FBI
  • Andrea Goldberg – Digital Culture Consulting
  • Nathan Kuncel – U of Minnesota
  • Chitra Sarmma – Infosys
  • Dan Russell – AON
  • Shila Ray – New Movement Theatre (Improv)
  • Dennis Doverspike – U of Akron

Session Coordinators: Emily Stehura & Megan Leasher


Session 4 – Storytelling: I-O as Comedy, Tragedy & Theater of the Absurd (50 minutes; Panel Format)

Description

What makes a long-lasting I-O initiative? What gets in the way? In this panel discussion, senior I-O psychologists will share stories about I-O initiatives they have led that succeeded, failed or never got off the ground. Participants will focus on advice, lessons learned, and how to hold onto yourself when you don’t know how it will end. Paul Yost will introduce the session by discussing the value of narrative for the I-O psychologist. In a lightly-facilitated discussion the panel will then draw on their rich experiences to respond to questions including:

  • Comedies (Successes): What is an I-O initiative that you led that didn’t look like it was going to succeed but did? [Key factors of its success? Lessons that you learned?]
  • Tragedies (Failures): What is an I-O initiative that you led that should have succeeded but failed? [What did you do to manage through the process? What lessons did you learn?]
  • The Absurd: What is an initiative that would be hard to believe if you hadn’t been there?
  • Stuck in the Middle: What should a person do when they find themselves in the middle of the story, unsure how it will turn out? How do you hold onto yourself in the middle of the story? Can you remember a time when this happened to you? What advice would you have for others?
  • Storytelling in I-O: How have you used storytelling in your practice? When is it appropriate? When isn’t it? What advice do you have for others?
  • Conclusion: What advice do you have for I-O psychologists to “build the I-O brand”?

Abstract

What factors are most critical in building an I-O or HR initiative that is sustainable over time? In this panel, senior I-O psychologists will share stories about successful (and unsuccessful) initiatives they have led, the lessons they have learned, and the advice they have for others.

Presenters

  • Wayne Cascio – University of Colorado, Denver
  • Rick Guzzo – Mercer
  • Lise Saari – New York University

Session Coordinator: Paul Yost


Session 5 –The Sweet-Spot for Organizational Interventions: Superglue or Teflon (80 minutes; Panel Format)

Description

The Panel will constitute the majority of the session time (60-70 minutes). The session will conclude with a 7-10 minute wrap up of the entire theme track by Evan Sinar. This wrap-up may culminate in distribution of summary “take-homes” that visually and informatively review the day’s key learnings (for example, badges symbolizing the content of each of the day’s 5 sessions), to maximize practical application of the information presented during the day.

Abstract

This session will provide attendees an opportunity to hear from a panel of senior practitioners about their experiences implementing organizational interventions. The various factors to consider when deciding how sticky to make an intervention will be shared along with how to get things unstuck when needed.

Presenters

  • Elizabeth Kolmstetter – Office of the Director of National Intelligence
  • Allen Kamin – GE
  • Steven Hunt – Success Factors an SAP Corporation
  • Rose Mueller-Hanson – PDRI
  • Doug Molitor – 3M
  • Corina Rice – CSX Transportation
  • Brian Penner – Prudential Staffing

Session Coordinators: Alana Cober & Megan Leasher