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SIOP 2015 Friday Seminars

Lance Ferris, The Pennsylvania State University, Chair

We are pleased to share with you the lineup for this year’s seminar presenters and topics. The Friday Seminars offer researchers and practitioners an opportunity to develop new skills, explore new topics, and to keep up with cutting-edge advances in research and practice. The invited experts will provide a thorough discussion of the topics in an interactive learning environment (e.g., lecture accompanied by break-out discussions, case studies, experiential exercises, and networking).

Space is limited and Friday Seminars do sell out, so we encourage you to register early to secure your spot. Please contact lanceferris@gmail.com if you have any questions.

Duration: Sessions are 3 hours in length.

Enrollment: Limited to the first 50 participants who register for each seminar.

Date and Time: Friday, April 24, 2015, during the morning (8:30 to 11:30 am) or afternoon (12:00 pm to 3:00 pm).

Location: The seminars will be held at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown (specific room is indicated below).

Fee: The cost for each Friday Seminar is $115.00 (USD).

Registration: Registration is available through the general online registration process for the conference.

Cancellation: Please click HERE for our cancellation policy.

Continuing Education Credit: 
The Friday Seminars are sponsored by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Inc. (SIOP) and presented as part of the 30th Annual Conference. SIOP is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. SIOP maintains responsibility for this program and its content. SIOP is also an HR Certification Institute Approved Provider for PHR, SPHR, and GPHR recertification credit.

Each Friday Seminar offers 3 continuing education credits for psychology purposes. Two of the seminars, as indicated below, also offer CE credit for PHR/SPHR/GPHR purposes.


FRIDAY SEMINAR 1 (Session 125): Statistical and Methodological Procedures for Meta-Analysis

April 24, 2015, Franklin 9, 8:30 - 11:30 am

Presenters: In-Sue Oh, Temple University, and Christopher Berry, Indiana University

Coordinator: Songqi Liu, Pennsylvania State University

Abstract:

In this seminar, we will first discuss the historical background around the development of meta-analysis and basic statistical procedures of meta-analysis. Then, we will discuss how to conduct a meta-analysis using Schmidt-Hunter methods and how to report and interpret meta-analytic results. Finally, we will discuss some important publication bias methods.

Full Description:

In this seminar, we will introduce the audience to the historical background around the development of meta-analysis (e.g., the situational specificity hypothesis, validity-generalization) followed by basic statistical procedures of meta-analysis. In addition, we will demonstrate how to conduct a meta-analysis using Schmidt-Hunter methods with some examples and how to report and interpret meta-analytic results (e.g., basic and moderator analysis results). We will briefly discuss how to run regression and path analyses using meta-analytic results. Finally, we will discuss several methods to detect and adjust for publication bias, which some regard as a great threat to the accuracy of meta-analytic results.

Intended Audience:

This seminar is intended for a general audience at a post-graduate level; no specific content knowledge is required.

Learning Objectives:

  • Summarize fundamental principles of meta-analysis
  • Conduct a meta-analysis to test a specific hypothesis
  • Utilize meta-analytic results to test a complex model
  • Report and interpret meta-analytic results

Presenter Biographies:

Dr. In-Sue Oh (PhD, University of Iowa) is an Associate Professor with tenure in the Department of Human Resource Management at the Fox School of Business, Temple University. Before joining Temple University, he was a faculty member at the University of Alberta and Virginia Commonwealth University. Before pursuing his academic career, he was an assistant HR manager at LG-Caltex Oil Corporation in Seoul, Korea. Dr. Oh's research interests include personnel selection, human capital resources, meta-analysis methods, managerial/leadership development, and person-environment fit. His research has been published in various journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Vocational Behavior, and Journal of Organizational Behavior. He has received multiple scholarly awards including the Early Career Achievement Award from the Academy of Management Human Resources Division (2014), the Joyce and Robert Hogan Award for Personality and Performance from the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology Foundation (2013), the Meredith P. Crawford Fellowship from the Human Resources Research Organization (2008-2009), and the James C. Johnson Paper Competition Award from the International Personnel Assessment Council (2009). He currently serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, and Academy of Management Journal, and as an Associate Editor of the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology.

Dr. Chris Berry is an Associate Professor with tenure in the Department of Management and Entrepreneurship at the Kelley School of Business, Indiana University. Before joining Indiana University, he was a faculty member in the Department of Psychology, Texas A&M University and Department of Psychology, Wayne State University. Dr. Berry earned his Ph.D. in Psychology (Industrial/Organizational) in 2007 from the University of Minnesota. He has two main research programs. The first research program focuses on measurement, conceptualization, and prediction of job performance, with a particular focus on the job performance dimensions of organizational citizenship behavior and counterproductive work behavior. The second research program focuses on the use of pre-employment tests (especially cognitive ability and personality tests) for making staffing decisions, with a particular focus on factors that affect conclusions about the fairness and/or validity of pre-employment test use. His research has been published in journals including Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Psychological Science, Journal of Management, and Journal of Organizational Behavior, among others. Dr. Berry has won numerous awards for his research including the Early Career Achievement Award from the Academy of Management Human Resources Division, the Meredith P. Crawford Fellowship from the Human Resources Research Organization, and the John C. Flanagan Award from the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Dr. Berry has served on the editorial boards of Personnel Psychology and Journal of Business and Psychology, and is an associate editor at Journal of Applied Psychology.


FRIDAY SEMINAR 2 (Session 126): The Science of Diversity at Work

April 24, 2015, Franklin 10, 8:30 - 11:30 am

Presenters: Eden King, George Mason University, and Michelle (Mikki) Hebl, Rice University

Coordinator: Adrienne Carter-Sowell, Texas A & M University



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Abstract:

Never before have people from so many different ethnic, religious, gender, sexual orientation, and age groups worked together in organizations. This dramatic demographic reality creates a critical need for overcoming challenges that arise in workplace interactions. This interactive session offers emerging evidence that identifies and addresses such challenges.

Full Description:

The emergence of an increasingly diverse American workplace highlights two important questions: (1) What happens when people from different backgrounds work together? and (2) How can organizations encourage positive interpersonal interactions? Provocative social science findings offer unique insights into how diverse employees and their employers can maximize the benefits of diversity. This seminar will include a thorough description of research on the contemporary workplace experiences of men and women and mothers and fathers from diverse ethnic, religious and age groups. In addition, individual and organizational strategies for improving these interactions will be discussed and modeled through interactive tasks.

Intended Audience:

This seminar is intended for a general audience at a post-graduate level; no specific content knowledge is required.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination and their interrelations
  • Discuss fundamental social psychological theory and evidence pertaining to stigma and diversity
  • List emerging evidence documenting challenges experienced by stigmatized workers and their consequences
  • Apply new individual and organizational techniques for reducing prejudice and discrimination
  • Demonstrate increased personal cultural competence

Presenter Biographies:

Dr. Eden King joined the faculty of the Industrial-Organizational Psychology program at George Mason University after earning her Ph.D. from Rice University in 2006. Dr. King is pursuing a program of research that seeks to guide the equitable and effective management of diverse organizations. Her research integrates organizational and social psychological theories in conceptualizing social stigma and the work-life interface. This research addresses three primary themes: 1) current manifestations of discrimination and barriers to work-life balance in organizations, 2) consequences of such challenges for its targets and their workplaces, and 3) individual and organizational strategies for reducing discrimination and increasing support for families. In addition to her academic positions, Dr. King has consulted on applied projects related to climate initiatives, selection systems, and diversity training programs, and she has worked as a trial consultant. She is currently an Associate Editor for the Journal of Management and the Journal of Business and Psychology and is on the editorial boards of the Academy of Management Journal and the Journal of Applied Psychology. Dr. King was honored to receive the State Council of Higher Education of Virginia's Rising Star Award in 2011.

Dr. Michelle (“Mikki”) Hebl is a full professor of psychology and management at Rice University.  She is a proud native of Pardeeville, Wisconsin, who graduated with her B.A. from Smith College and her Ph.D. at Dartmouth College.  She joined the faculty at Rice University in 1998 and was given the endowed title of the Radoslav Tsanoff Assistant Professorship in 2000. Mikki is an applied psychologist who is interested in the ways in which social psychological phenomena can be applied to industries and organizations. Her research specifically focuses on workplace discrimination and barriers stigmatized individuals (e.g., women and ethnic minorities) face in social interactions, the hiring process, business settings, and the medical community. In addition, she addresses ways in which both individuals and organizations can remediate such discrimination. She has more than 100 publications that include journal articles, book chapters, and edited books. In 2014, she was honored with the Academy of Management’s Sage Award for lifetime achievement in research advancing knowledge of gender and diversity in organizations. Mikki is a strong advocate for gender issues. In 1999 and 2003, she received Rice University Women's Resource Center Impact Awards for her commitment to research on gender and service to women in the community. In 2006, she was one of five co-PI’s at Rice who received an NSF grant for over three and one-half million dollars to advance women in STEM fields on Rice University’s campus. In 2010 and 2011, she was co-awarded NIH grants to examine gender biases in letters of recommendation (’10) and successful mentoring relationships (’11). Mikki is also simply passionate about teaching. In her 16 years at Rice, she has been the recipient of 17 major teaching awards.


FRIDAY SEMINAR 3 (Session 171): Longitudinal Data Analytic Techniques Using Latent Variables

April 24, 2015, Franklin 9, 12:00 - 3:00 pm

Presenter: Robert Vandenberg, University of Georgia

Coordinator: Ning Li, University of Iowa

Abstract:

The primary objective of this Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) seminar is to teach participants how to use the features within the Mplus software package to test longitudinal types of models including latent change score analyses and latent growth modeling. The instructor will provide the data and the syntax files used in the seminar.

Full Description:

The primary objective of this Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) seminar is to discuss the theoretical considerations that need to be addressed when designing a longitudinal study and teach participants how to use the features within the Mplus software package to test longitudinal types of models including latent change score analyses when data were collected at two points in time and latent growth modeling when data were collected at 3 or more points in time. Participants are expected to possess a strong understanding of latent measurement models, and tests of latent path models using SEM. The instructor will provide the data and the syntax files used in the seminar.

Intended Audience
This seminar is intended for sophisticated users of SEM modeling interested in the application of Mplus software for longitudinal model testing.

Learning objectives

  • Analyze and test longitudinal types of models using the Mplus software package
  • Explain the theoretical considerations that need to be addressed when designing a longitudinal study
  • Utilize latent change score analyses when data were collected at two points in time
  • Utilize latent growth modeling when data were collected at 3 or more points in time

Presenter Biography:

Dr. Robert (Bob) Vandenberg is the Robert O. Arnold Professor of Business, and the Chair of the Department of Management in the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia.  He teaches in the undergraduate, MBA and Ph.D. programs.  Bob's research focuses on organizational commitment, high involvement work processes, measurement invariance, latent growth modeling, and multilevel structural equation modeling.  Bob's articles on these topics have appeared in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Organizational Behavior Human Decision Processes, Organizational Research Methods, Organization Science, and other journals. He has served on the editorial boards of many of those journals and was the editor-in-chief of Organizational Research Methods from 2008 through 2010.  He is past division chair of the Research Methods Division of the Academy of Management, and a fellow of APA, SIOP, and the Southern Management Association. Bob received the 2010 Distinguished Career Award from the Academy of Management’s Research Methods Division.  Bob has taught introductory and advanced structural equation modeling (SEM) courses for over a decade within the Center for the Advancement of Research Methods and Analysis (CARMA at Wayne State University; http://carma.wayne.edu/Default.asp) both in the U.S. and overseas.  Finally, and vastly more important than any and all of the above, Bob is married to his best friend, Carole, and has three adult children, Drew (with a wonderful wife, Catherine), Kaity and Jackson, three very spoiled dogs, and rides his Harley-Davidson with a passion every day. Dr. Vandenberg holds a PhD in Social-Organizational Psychology from the University of Georgia.


FRIDAY SEMINAR 4 (Session 172): Dark Triad and Socially Aversive Personality Traits in the Workplace

April 24, 2015, Franklin 10, 12:00 - 3:00 pm

Presenters: Ernest O’Boyle, University of Iowa, and Donelson Foryth, University of Richmond

Coordinator: Sang Eun Woo, Purdue University



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Abstract:

This seminar reviews the Dark Triad personality traits and related psychological constructs addressing ethical judgment and behavior. Discussion topics include prediction of work outcomes such as job performance, citizenship behaviors, and workplace deviance, cultural and professional differences in ethics and moral philosophy, and legal issues in HR applications.

Full Description:

This seminar will review the Dark Triad personality traits as well as related psychological constructs addressing ethical judgment and behavior. We will discuss how these individual differences explain work outcomes such as job performance, citizenship behaviors, and workplace deviance, and their incremental validity beyond the Five Factor Model. We will also cover cultural and professional differences in ethics and moral philosophy, and how these might affect organizational functioning in a globalized environment. Finally, we will describe some recent work on the applicability of these measures in HR contexts such as selection, along with the legal aspects of dark traits.

Intended Audience:

This seminar is intended for a general audience at a post-graduate level; no specific content knowledge is required.

Learning Objectives:

  • Summarize the factors that influence moral and immoral action, including the Dark Triad of Personality (Machiavellianism, Psychoticism, and Narcissism) and such other related psychological constructs as idealism and relativism
  • Evaluate the psychometric properties of the Dark Triad and related constructs
  • Describe ways the Dark Triad can be used in work and organizational contexts
  • Explain the legal issues surrounding the validity and application of these measures to the workplace

Presenter Biographies:

Ernest O’Boyle received his PhD in organizational behavior and human resource management in 2010 from Virginia Commonwealth University. He is currently an assistant professor of management and organizations in the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. He teaches Business Ethics, Organizational Behavior, Measurement, and Meta-Analysis at the undergraduate and doctoral level. His research focuses on dark personality traits (psychopathy, narcissism, and Machiavellianism), counterproductive work behaviors, superstar effects, and research methods (e.g., meta-analysis, structural equation modeling). In addition, he studies questionable research practices, research ethics, and publication bias within the applied psychology and management disciplines. His work has been published in such outlets as Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Psychological Bulletin, and Personnel Psychology. In addition, his work has been featured in BusinessWeek, NPR’s Morning Edition, and the Wall Street Journal.

Donelson R. Forsyth, a social and personality psychologist, studies groups, leadership, ethical thought, and moral judgment. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Florida, and is currently a professor at the Jepson School of Leadership Studies, at the University of Richmond, where he holds the Colonel Leo K. and Gaylee Thorsness Endowed Chair in Ethical Leadership. In addition to his general interest in group processes and psychological aspects of moral judgments, he explores empirically the psychological and interpersonal consequences of success and failure at the group and individual level, individual differences in ethical ideology, and perceptions of leaders. He has authored over 150 books, chapters, and articles on ethics, groups and related topics, and is the developer of the Ethics Position Questionnaire—which measures individual differences in idealism and relativism. His work has been supported by grants from the NIH, NSF, JPL/NASA, and SCHEV and has been featured in USA Today, the Wall Street Journal, Fox News, and the ABC Nightly News. He is a fellow in the American Psychological Association.


The use of the HRCI seal is not an endorsement by the HR Certification Institute of the quality of the program.  It means that this program has met the HR Certification Institute's criteria to be pre-approved for recertification credit.


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