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Theme Track: Rethinking Our Approach to Organizational Science

Chair: Scott Tonidandel, Davidson College

This full day of programming on Thursday, April 23, 2015, will focus on helping to create what SIOP President, Jose Cortina, calls “a revolution with a solution,” aimed at establishing improved standards for our science. There is no additional cost to attend beyond the cost of basic conference registration.

Continuing Education:
SIOP is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. SIOP maintains responsibility for this program and its contents. Each Theme Track session is eligible for continuing education credit for psychologists. The amount of credit is noted below.

Schedule for Thursday, April 23, 2015

10:30am - 11:50am Improving the Peer Review Process: Advancing Science and Practice
12:00pm - 1:20pm Pursuing Better Science in Organizational Psychology
1:30pm - 2:50pm Modernizing Regression: Cool and Practically Useful Advances from Other Fields
3:00pm - 3:30pm Coffee Break
3:30pm - 4:20pm Going Forward by Going Back: “Ignite” our Basic Stats!
4:30pm  - 5:50pm Big Data Advances from Computer Science and Statistics

 

Theme Track: Improving the Peer Review Process: Advancing Science and Practice
1.5 continuing education credits for psychologists

Theme Track: Improving the Peer Review Process: Advancing Science and Practice
1.5 continuing education credits for psychologists

Coordinator:
Dr. Jeff Johnson, PDRI, a CEB Company

Presenters:
Dr. Jeff Edwards, University of North Carolina
Dr. Scott Highhouse, Bowling Green State University
Dr. Nancy Tippins, CEB Valtera
Dr. Robert Vandenberg, University of Georgia

Abstract:
Breakdowns in the peer review process result in the retraction of published articles, an inability to replicate studies, and research with little application to practice. The goal of this session is to provide authors and reviewers with information and tools they can use to improve the quality of published research.

Full Description:
The peer review process is a vital part of knowledge generation and transmission. Academics and practitioners both have a stake in understanding and improving the peer review process. Panelists will present ways to improve the peer review process. Via discussion groups, participants will engage (a) experienced authors and reviewers with ideas on how to improve the review process, (b) novice and potential reviewers who have more basic questions, and (c) practitioners with questions and ideas for improving the applicability of published research.

Intended Audience:

This session is intended for I-O psychologists who are part of or would like to be part of the journal review process and are interested in helping improve the process.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the current peer review process
  • Describe the gaps in the current peer review process
  • Describe the tools and factors available to help reviewers evaluate research

Presenter Biographies:

Dr. Jeff W. Johnson is a Principal Research Scientist at PDRI, a CEB Company, where he has directed many applied organizational research projects for a variety of government and private sector clients. His main areas of expertise are in the development and validation of assessments for selection, promotion, and individual development; the measurement of individual job performance; research design; measurement; and statistics. Jeff is widely published in a variety of journals and has written several book chapters. He is a past Associate Editor of Personnel Psychology and is a member of the editorial boards of Organizational Research Methods, Human Performance, Personnel Assessment and Decisions, and Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice. He is a Fellow of SIOP and APA, and was awarded SIOP’s M. Scott Myers Award for Applied Research in the Workplace in 2012. Jeff received his Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the University of Minnesota. 

Dr. Jeff Edwards is the Belk Distinguished Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Kenan-Flagler Business School at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  He is past editor of Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, has served as associate editor for Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Organizational Research Methods, the Journal of Organizational Behavior, and Management Science, and has served on the editorial boards of the Academy of Management Journal, the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Organizational Research Methods, the Journal of Organizational Behavior, the Journal of Management, the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, and Social Indicators Research.  He has been elected to various positions in the Academy of Management, including representative at large, program chair, and division chair of the Research Methods Division as well as representative at large, program chair, and division chair of the Organization Behavior Division.  He is a Fellow of the Academy of Management, the American Psychological Association, the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the Center for the Advancement of Research Methods and Analysis (CARMA), and has been elected to the Society of Organizational Behavior.  He has received the Distinguished Career Award from the Research Methods Division of the Academy of Management. Jeff received his Ph.D. in organizational psychology and theory from the Graduate School of Industrial Administration from Carnegie Mellon University.

Dr. Scott Highhouse is a Professor and Ohio Eminent Scholar in the Department of Psychology, Bowling Green State University. Scott served as Associate Editor of OBHDP from 2001-2007, and as Associate Editor of JOOP from 2007-2009. He was also co-editor, with Neal Schmitt, of the Industrial-Organizational Psychology volume of Wiley’s 2013 Handbook of Psychology. Currently he is founding editor of the new journal Personnel Assessment and Decisions. Scott has been named a fellow of the APA, the APS, and SIOP. He served as Publications Officer on SIOP’s executive board from 2009-2012. He currently serves on the board of directors for the International Personnel Assessment Council (IPAC). Dr. Highhouse holds a PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from the University of Missouri-St Louis.

Dr. Nancy Tippins is a Senior Vice President of CEB - SHL Talent Measurement Solutions where she manages teams that develop talent acquisition programs related to employee selection, test development and validation, litigation support, work force planning, competency identification, executive assessment, succession planning, and employee and leadership development.  Nancy is active in professional affairs. She has a longstanding involvement with the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology where she served as President.  She is a past Associate Editor for the Scientist-Practitioner Forum of Personnel Psychology and is currently on the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Personnel Assessment and Decisions, and Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice. She is a fellow of SIOP (Division 14 of the American Psychological Association - APA), Division 5 (APA), the American Psychological Association (APA), and the American Psychological Society (APS).  She received her Ph.D. from Georgia Institute of Technology.

Dr. Robert (Bob) J. Vandenberg is the Robert O. Arnold Professor of Business, and the Chair of the Department of Management in the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia.  He teaches in the undergraduate, MBA and Ph.D. programs.  Bob's research focuses on organizational commitment, high involvement work processes, measurement invariance, latent growth modeling, and multilevel structural equation modeling.  Bob's articles on these topics have appeared in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Organizational Behavior Human Decision Processes, Organizational Research Methods, Organization Science, and other journals. He has served on the editorial boards of many of those journals and was the editor-in-chief of Organizational Research Methods from 2008 through 2010.  He is past division chair of the Research Methods Division of the Academy of Management, and a fellow of APA, SIOP, and the Southern Management Association. Bob received the 2010 Distinguished Career Award from the Academy of Management’s Research Methods Division.  Bob has taught introductory and advanced structural equation modeling (SEM) courses for over a decade within the Center for the Advancement of Research Methods and Analysis (CARMA at Wayne State University; http://carma.wayne.edu/Default.asp) both in the U.S. and overseas.  Finally, and vastly more important than any and all of the above, Bob is married to his best friend, Carole, and has three adult children, Drew (with a wonderful wife, Catherine), Kaity and Jackson, three very spoiled dogs, and rides his Harley-Davidson with a passion every day. Dr. Vandenberg holds a PhD in Social-Organizational Psychology from the University of Georgia.


Theme Track: Pursuing Better Science in Organizational Psychology
1.5 continuing education credits for psychologists

Chair:
Dr. Tine Köhler, The University of Melbourne

Presenters:
Dr. Robert J. Vandenberg, University of Georgia
Dr. Herman Aguinis, Indiana University
Dr. Steven G. Rogelberg, University of North Carolina Charlotte
Dr. Jose M. Cortina, SIOP President, George Mason University
Dr. Ronald S. Landis, Illinois Institute of Technology

Abstract:
There is greater recognition that the current incentive structure in organizational science needs to be improved. A panel of experts consisting of journal editors and experienced researchers will discuss ways to improve the incentive structure to encourage better science.

Full Description:
The current scientific model in organizational research needs to be improved. In our publication process, there is an overemphasis on theory with little emphasis on empirical replication. Tenure and promotion decisions are often based on publishing in the “right” journals. There is also little incentive for practitioners to publish. In this panel discussion, a panel of experts consisting of journal editors and experienced researchers will discuss how to change the incentive structure to encourage better science. Alternatives such as the open science movement, innovative editorial strategies, and approaches used in disciplines outside of I-O will be presented.

Intended Audience:
This session is intended for I-O psychologists.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe current incentive structure within organization science
  • Describe alternatives to the current incentive structure
  • Explain how changes to the incentive structure will encourage better science

Presenter Biographies:

Dr. Tine Köhler is a Lecturer for International Management in the Department of Management and Marketing at the University of Melbourne, Australia. Her research interests include global teamwork, cross-cultural differences in norms, communication and coordination, trust, and qualitative and quantitative research methods, including grounded theory, case studies, meta-analysis, regression, and the application of methods grounded in cognitive neuroscience to the study of organizational phenomena. Dr. Köhler is an Associate Editor for the Academy of Management Learning and Education journal and an editorial board member of Organizational Research Methods, Journal of Management Studies, and Small Group Research. She further reviews for the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Management, and the Canadian Journal of Administrative Science. She is a CARMA instructor and member of the CARMA international advisory board. Dr. Köhler holds a PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from George Mason University.

Dr. Robert (Bob) J. Vandenberg is the Robert O. Arnold Professor of Business, and the Chair of the Department of Management in the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia.  He teaches in the undergraduate, MBA and Ph.D. programs.  Bob's research focuses on organizational commitment, high involvement work processes, measurement invariance, latent growth modeling, and multilevel structural equation modeling.  Bob's articles on these topics have appeared in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Organizational Behavior Human Decision Processes, Organizational Research Methods, Organization Science, and other journals. He has served on the editorial boards of many of those journals and was the editor-in-chief of Organizational Research Methods from 2008 through 2010.  He is past division chair of the Research Methods Division of the Academy of Management, and a fellow of APA, SIOP, and the Southern Management Association. Bob received the 2010 Distinguished Career Award from the Academy of Management’s Research Methods Division.  Bob has taught introductory and advanced structural equation modeling (SEM) courses for over a decade within the Center for the Advancement of Research Methods and Analysis (CARMA at Wayne State University; http://carma.wayne.edu/Default.asp) both in the U.S. and overseas.  Finally, and vastly more important than any and all of the above, Bob is married to his best friend, Carole, and has three adult children, Drew (with a wonderful wife, Catherine), Kaity and Jackson, three very spoiled dogs, and rides his Harley-Davidson with a passion every day. Dr. Vandenberg holds a PhD in Social-Organizational Psychology from the University of Georgia.

Dr. Herman Aguinis (http://mypage.iu.edu/~haguinis) is the John F. Mee Chair of Management, Professor of Organizational Behavior and Human Resources, and the Founding Director of the Institute for Global Organizational Effectiveness at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. His research is interdisciplinary and addresses human capital acquisition, development, deployment, and research methods and analysis. He has published five books and more than 120 articles in refereed journals. He is a fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Academy of Management, American Psychological Association, and Association for Psychological Science, and past editor-in-chief of Organizational Research Methods. He is a recipient of the Academy of Management Research Methods Division Distinguished Career Award, Academy of Management Entrepreneurship Division IDEA Thought Leader Award, and received best article of the year awards from Personnel Psychology, Organizational Research Methods, Journal of Organizational Behavior, and Academy of Management Perspectives. Dr. Aguinis holds a PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from University at Albany, SUNY.

Dr. Steven G. Rogelberg is a Professor and Director of Organizational Science at the University of North Carolina Charlotte, designated by the Board of Trustees as the first and presently only “University Professor” at UNC Charlotte for distinguished national, international and interdisciplinary contributions. He has over 80 publications addressing issues such as team effectiveness, leadership, engagement, health and employee well-being, meetings at work, and organizational research methods. Other awards and honors include receiving the Distinguished Service Award, Psi Chi Professor of the Year Award, Fellow of the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the BGSU Master Teacher Award. He is the Editor of the Journal of Business and Psychology. Key professional leadership roles have included Program Chair for the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP), elected Science and Research Officer (SIOP), and serving as Chair of the SIOP Education and Training committee. He also co-founded the EditorEthics initiative. Dr. Rogelberg holds a PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from University of Connecticut.

Dr. Jose M. Cortina is a Professor in the I/O Psychology program at George Mason University.  Professor Cortina received his Ph.D. in 1994 from Michigan State University.  His recent research has involved topics in meta-analysis, structural equation modeling, significance testing, and philosophy of science as well as predictors and outcomes of emotions in the workplace.  His work has been published in journals such as the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Psychological Bulletin, Organizational Research Methods, and Psychological Methods.  He currently serves as Editor of Organizational Research Methods and is a former Associate Editor of the Journal of Applied Psychology.  Dr. Cortina was honored by SIOP with the 2001 Ernest J. McCormick Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions, by the Research Methods Division of the Academy of Management with the 2004 Robert O. McDonald Best Paper Award and by the Organizational Research Methods Editorial Board with the 2012 Best Paper Award.  He was also honored by George Mason University with a 2010 Teaching Excellence Award and by SIOP with the 2011 Distinguished Teaching Award.  Dr. Cortina is the current President of SIOP.

Dr. Ronald S. Landis is the Nambury S. Raju Professor of Psychology and the Department Chair. He has also served on the faculty at Tulane University, where he was awarded the Tulane President's Award for Excellence in Graduate and Professional Teaching. He is a Fellow of SIOP and APA and was honored by the Organizational Research Methods Editorial Board with the 2012 Best Paper Award. Ron has primary research interests in the areas of structural equation modeling, multiple regression, and other issues associated with measurement and the prediction of performance. He currently serves as Associate Editor for the Journal of Business and Psychology and is on the editorial boards of Personnel Psychology, Organizational Research Methods, Journal of Management, Human Performance and Journal of Applied Psychology. Dr. Landis holds a PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from Michigan State University.


Theme Track: Modernizing Regression: Cool and Practically Useful Advances from Other Fields
1.5 continuing education credits for psychologists

Chair:
Dr. Dan Putka, Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO)

Presenter:
Dr. Fred Oswald, Rice University
Dr. Seth Spain, Binghamton University, State University of New York
Dr. Brian S. Connelly, University of Toronto

Abstract:
Over the past few decades there have been several developments in disciplines outside of I-O psychology that can improve the use of multiple regression in I-O science and practice.  This session will consist of three TED-style talks that address developments in (a) variable selection, (b) model uncertainty, and (c) causality.

Full Description:

One of the bread-and-butter techniques in an I-O psychologist’s statistical tool kit is multiple regression. Whether one is in an academic role, or practitioner role, multiple regression is still used in many contexts. Although most I-Os have been formally trained on multiple regression, over the past few decades there have been several developments in disciplines outside of I-O psychology that can improve the use of regression in I-O science and practice. This session will consist of three TED-style talks that address advances in multiple regression in the areas of (a) variable selection, (b) model uncertainty, and (c) causality.

Intended Audience:

This session is intended I-O psychologists who have had at least one graduate level course in multiple regression and who are generally familiar with its uses for I-O research and practice.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe recent advances in the area of variable selection in multiple regression
  • Describe the importance of model uncertainty in the context of multiple regression
  • Describe recent advances in assessing causality within a multiple regression framework

Presenter Biographies:

Dr. Dan Putka is a Principal Staff Scientist at HumRRO.  He has over a decade of hands-on experience developing and evaluating assessments for selection and promotion, and managing and modeling large, messy archrival data sets for purposes of predicting and understanding of key outcomes such as job performance, turnover, counterproductive work behavior, and job satisfaction.  Aside from his client centered work, Dan has maintained an active presence in the I-O scientific community having authored numerous book chapters and journals articles on a variety of methodologically-oriented topics, and serving on the editorial boards of four journals. He is a past-president of the Personnel Testing Council of Metropolitan Washington, and a Fellow of APA and three of its divisions (5, 14, and 19). Dan received his Ph.D. in I-O Psychology with a specialization in quantitative methods from Ohio University. 

Dr. Fred Oswald is a Professor of I-O Psychology at Rice University.  His substantive research, extensive publications, and funded projects focus on personnel selection, military selection and classification, and college admissions—all based on data that are often complex in many ways (e.g., large data sets, missing data, large number of variables).  His methodological expertise focuses on meta-analysis and psychometric methods.  Fred is the Associate Editor of Psychological MethodsJournal of Management, and Research Synthesis Methods and serves on eight editorial boards. He serves as the current Research and Science Officer at SIOP and is a Fellow of SIOP, APA (Divs. 5, 14) and APS. Fred received his Ph.D. in I-O Psychology from University of Minnesota in 1999.

Dr. Seth Spain is an Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior and Leadership at Binghamton University. He has nearly a decade of experience working with large, poorly structured datasets in industry, government, and military settings. His research focuses on the assessment of individual differences and their role in leadership, especially the dark side of personality, the dynamics of job performance, and research methods, especially statistical learning theory and Bayesian analysis. He received his PhD in I-O Psychology from University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, with a minor in Quantitative Psychology.

Dr. Brian Connelly is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Management at University of Toronto Scarborough and the Rotman School of Management. He teaches courses in human resources, organizational behavior, and research methods.  He received his Ph.D. in I-O Psychology from the University of Minnesota and was previously an assistant professor at the University of Connecticut.  Dr. Connelly’s research examines how organizations can best use personality measures to solve workplace challenges, particularly in employee selection and development. In current and on-going research, he has used personality ratings from others (e.g., one’s peers, friends, or family) to study the limitations of self-knowledge, how first impressions are formed, the way people “fake” personality measures, and the structure of personality.  Dr. Connelly’s research has been recognized with multiple awards spanning across both industrial and organizational psychology and personality psychology.  His research has appeared in journals including Psychological Bulletin, American Psychologist, Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and Journal of Personality.


Theme Track: Going Forward by Going Back: “Ignite” our Basic Stats!
1 continuing education credit for psychologists

Co-Chairs:
Paul Bliese, University of South Carolina
Patrick Rosopa, Clemson University

Presenters:
Eden King, George Mason University
Scott Tonidandel, Davidson College
Mark Gavin, West Virginia University
Larry Williams, University of North Dakota

Abstract:
This symposium will use a format modeled after the popular Ignite sessions to advance our understanding of fundamental design and analysis issues. Specific topics include revisiting the role of field experiments; understanding t-tests; reviewing the logic behind the bootstrap; interpreting dummy codes; sandwich estimators in regression, and df in SEM.

Full Description:
Novel, complex, statistical methods frequently offer new ways to explore data and build theory. At the same time, however, the field of applied psychology may benefit from revisiting some basic elements of design and analysis. This symposium will use a session format modeled after the popular Ignite sessions to review some of the basic fundamentals of design and analysis and help move the field forward. 

Intended Audience:
This session is intended I-O psychologists.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the defining features of field experiments, explain when and why field experiments may be useful, and identify strategies for overcoming challenges inherent to field experiments
  • Compare various t-test approaches and assess which approach is best for certain situations
  • Describe the non-parametric bootstrap and explain why the bootstrap is a fundamental tool in statistical analyses
  • Describe dummy coding and how it can be used in statistical testing and inference
  • Describe sandwich estimators and how they can be used to conduct statistical tests
  • Explain (a) how to calculate the degrees of freedom for structural equation models with latent variables, (b) model characteristics that influence degrees of freedom, and (c) the role of degrees of freedom in judging model fit

Presenter Biographies:

Paul D. Bliese is an Associate Professor of Business Administration in the Management Department of the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina.  Prior to joining the University of South Carolina, Paul spent 22 years as Research Psychologist in the US Army and retired at the rank of Colonel.  Throughout his professional career, Dr. Bliese has led efforts to advance statistical methods and apply analytics to complex organizational data.  He developed the multilevel package for the open-source statistical programming language R, and was instrumental in funding the development of the lme4 package.  Overall, his research has been influential in advancing organizational multilevel theory, and has had a demonstrable impact on health and HR-related policy decisions within the US Army and the Department of Defense. Dr. Bliese holds a PhD in Social-Organizational Psychology from Texas Tech University.

Dr. Patrick Rosopa is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Clemson University. He earned his Ph.D. in I-O Psychology at the University of Central Florida and his B.S. at Tulane University. He currently serves as a statistical consultant for various organizations including BMW, Greenville Hospital System, and Cognitive Performance Group. Dr. Rosopa’s research has been published in such outlets as Psychological Methods, Organizational Research Methods, Human Resource Management Review, and Journal of Vocational Behavior. In addition to serving as an ad hoc reviewer for various journals including Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Research Methods, and Computational Statistics, he serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Managerial Psychology. He also coauthored a book titled Statistical Reasoning in the Behavioral Sciences (2010, Wiley).

Eden King is an Associate Professor of Psychology at George Mason University.  Dr. King is pursuing a program of research that relies heavily on field experiments and triangulation of evidence and integrates organizational and social psychological theories in conceptualizing social stigma and the work-life interface. She is currently an Associate Editor for the Journal of Management and the Journal of Business and Psychology and is co-editing a book on Big Data at Work. Dr. King was honored to receive the State Council of Higher Education of Virginia's Rising Star Award in 2011. Dr. King earned her Ph.D. in I-O Psychology from Rice University in 2006.

Scott Tonidandel is the Wayne M. and Carolyn A. Watson Associate Professor of Psychology at Davidson College. His research interests span a wide variety of topics including issues related to computerized testing, the effects of employee mentoring programs, predictors of leadership effectiveness, and the impact of diversity in organizations. He also conducts research on a variety of statistical and methodological issues. He has published over 40 articles (often with student coauthors) in numerous scholarly outlets, such as the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Psychological Methods, and Organizational Research Methods. Scott currently serves as the associate editor for both the Journal of Business and Psychology and Organizational Research Methods. Scott holds a B.A. degree in psychology from Davidson College and an M.A. and Ph.D. in industrial-organizational psychology from Rice University.

Mark B. Gavin received a Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management from Purdue University. He is currently an Associate Professor of Management and Ph.D. Program Coordinator in the Department of Management of the College of Business and Economics at West Virginia University. Prior to West Virginia University, he served on the faculty of Oklahoma State University. His research interests include trust, leadership, and multilevel phenomena, both from a substantive and methodological/analytical perspective, as well as the application of advanced analytical techniques to organizational data.  

Dr. Larry J. Williams joined the faculty at the University of North Dakota in August 2014, and previously was on the faculty at Wayne State University, Virginia Commonwealth University, the University of Tennessee, and Purdue University.  Dr. Williams received his Ph.D. in organizational behavior from the Indiana University School of Business and his main research interests involve the application of structural equation methods to various substantive and methodological concerns.  Dr. Williams was the Founding Editor of Organizational Research Methods (ORM), and was selected to be the recipient of the 2005 Distinguished Career Contributions Award by the Academy of Management’s Research Methods Division. He was elected a Fellow of the Society for Industrial Organizational Psychology in 2010. Professor Williams established in 1997 and currently serves as Director of the Center for the Advancement of Research Methods and Analysis (CARMA), an interdisciplinary center devoted to helping faculty and students advance their knowledge of organizational and social science research methods and data analysis techniques.


Theme Track: Big Data Advances from Computer Science and Statistics
1.5 continuing education credits for psychologists

Chair:
Adam Meade, North Carolina State University

Presenters:
Evan Sinar, Developmental Dimensions International (DDI)
Ehsan Bokhari, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Andrea Villanes, Institute for Advanced Analytics (IAA) at North Carolina State University

Abstract: 
Over the past two decades, computer science and statistics have made significant advances in dealing with “Big Data” issues such as large and sparsely populated data matrices, data visualization, and text data mining. This session will consist of three 20-minute symposium talks focus centered around significant advances in these fields. 

Full Description:
A challenge when working with Big Data is how to interpret and communicate key findings within the context of data complexity and volume. The first session will overview data visualization techniques such as Alluvial Diagrams, Word Clouds, Horizon Charts, and Parallel Coordinates.  While structured survey results are informative, often open-ended comments contain a wealth of information. New approaches to automated text analytics in the context of employee/customer surveys, assessment centers, interviews, and other common IO measures will be discussed. The final session will introduce decision trees and ensemble learning algorithms.

Intended Audience:
This session is intended I-O psychologists who have an interest in applying big data analytics to either research or practice.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe several methods of data visualization
  • Select data visualization method that would improve the understanding of your organization’s data
  • Discuss ways that advanced regression trees can be applied to I-O data
  • Describe the differences between typical linear regression and random forest approaches to prediction
  • Design a study that uses text analytics to understand the content of employee survey open-ended comments
  • Generate a list of applications for text analytics than an organization could use with customer, employee, or applicant data

Presenter Biographies:

Evan Sinar, Ph.D., is Developmental Dimensions International’s (DDI’s) Chief Scientist and Director of the Center for Analytics and Behavioral Research (CABER), a team of analytical specialists deploying its expertise globally across DDI’s solutions portfolio. Evan partners with client organizations to architect and execute analytic initiatives to demonstrate the impact of assessment and development programs on individual-level behavior change and organizational-level business objectives. Evan is also the lead author of DDI’s Global Leadership Forecast, a major trend research study providing deep and actionable insights on how organizations can optimize their management of leadership talent in alignment with strategic priorities. Prior to his role as Chief Scientist Evan held the role of Manager of Assessment and Selection Analytics, leading design, development, and technology integrity for DDI’s screening and testing solutions. Evan is an editorial board member of Journal of Applied Psychology and Journal of Business and Psychology and has also authored over 60 professional presentations and publications for major journals and professional conferences. He is a thought leader for DDI on topics such as data visualization, leadership development, generational differences, social media, and pre-employment assessment. Dr. Sinar received a PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from Bowling Green State University.

Ehsan Bokhari, Ph.D. holds a B.S. in psychology and in mathematics from the University of Arizona, as well as an M.S. in statistics and a Ph.D. in quantitative psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). He is currently a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Statistics at UIUC. His research focuses on the evaluation of prediction models, with particular attention given to the prediction of violent and dangerous behavior. His current research interests include probabilistic reasoning, multiway analysis, fuzzy set theory, statistical learning, and sabermetrics.

Andrea Villanes is a Research Associate at the Institute for Advanced Analytics (IAA) at North Carolina State University (NCSU). Andrea has a Bachelor degree in Computer Science from the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú in Lima, Peru; a Master degree in Analytics and in Computer Science from NCSU, and is pursuing a doctoral degree in Computer Science (NCSU). As a member of the MSA program, Andrea co-­leads the Text Mining and Visualization curriculum, where she uses SAS, Python and Tableau to capture trends in textual data and visualize information. Andrea has collaborated extensively with Walmart, where she led the text mining adoption initiative, collaborating with several cross functional teams to analyze open-ended customer survey responses and social media information including data from Twitter and Facebook, in order to understand customer’s sentiment, and understand employees’ feedback through open-­ended questions. Andrea is the co­founder of Women in Technology Perú, an Anita Borg Pass­It­On award recipient for her outreach work to encourage girls to pursue a career in Computer Science.


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