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SIOP 2016 Friday Seminars

Songqi Liu, Georgia State University, Chair

We are pleased to share with you the lineup for this year’s seminar presenters and topics. The Friday Seminars offer researchers and practitioners an opportunity to develop new skills, explore new topics, and to keep up with cutting-edge advances in research and practice. The invited experts will provide a thorough discussion of the topics in an interactive learning environment (e.g., lecture accompanied by break-out discussions, case studies, experiential exercises, and networking).

Space is limited and Friday Seminars do sell out, so we encourage you to register early to secure your spot. Please contact sqliu@gsu.edu if you have any questions.

Duration: 

Sessions are 3 hours in length.

Enrollment: 

Limited to the first 50 participants who register for each seminar.

Date and Time: 

Friday, April 15, 2016, during the morning (8:00 to 11:00 am), at noon (11:30 am to 2:30 pm), or afternoon (3:00 to 6:00 pm).

Location: 

The seminars will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center (specific room is TBA).

Fee: 

The cost for each Friday Seminar is $115.00 (USD).

Registration: 

Registration is available through the general online registration process for the conference.

Cancellation: 

Please click HERE for our cancellation policy.

Continuing Education Credit:

The Friday Seminars are sponsored by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Inc. (SIOP) and presented as part of the 31st Annual Conference. SIOP is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. SIOP maintains responsibility for this program and its content. SIOP is also an HR Certification Institute Approved Provider for PHR, SPHR, and GPHR recertification credit and a SHRM Recertification Provider. There are no known conflicts of interest or commercial support regarding these sessions and their presenters.

The type of continuing education credit available will be posted here when finalized.


FRIDAY SEMINAR 1: Person-Centered Analyses

April 15, 2016, 8:00 am - 11:00 am - Room 205 A

Presenter:

Bob Vandenberg, University of Georgia

Coordinator:

Jason L. Huang, Michigan State University

Abstract:

This introductory seminar exposes participants to what is commonly referred to as “person-centered analyses.” The seminar includes a general overview of the differences between variable-centered and person-centered approaches, demonstrations of the many types of person-centered approaches, and presentations of more complex analyses such as latent class analyses.

Full Description:

We will discuss the differences between variable-centered and person-centered approaches to analyses, providing a context as to when one vs. the other is appropriate. We will then demonstrate the many types of person-centered approaches, beginning with the simplest referred to as latent transition analysis and progressing to a series of more complex analyses known as latent class analyses on both continuous like and dichotomous variables. The same sets of techniques will be used in the “hypothesis-testing” framework where the sets of persons are expected conceptually to differ with respect to the relationships among variables in a given structural equation model. 

Intended Audience:

This seminar is intended for a general audience at a post-graduate level; knowledge of Mplus software would be beneficial but is not required.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain difference between variable-centered and person-centered approaches to data analyses
  • Summarize basic characteristics and applications of latent transition analysis
  • Summarize basic characteristics and applications of latent class analyses
  • Conceptually apply person-centered techniques in the hypothesis-testing framework

Presenter Biography:

Dr. Robert (Bob) Vandenberg is the Robert O. Arnold Professor of Business, and the Chair of the Department of Management in the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia.  He teaches in the undergraduate, MBA and Ph.D. programs. Bob's research focuses on organizational commitment, high involvement work processes, measurement invariance, latent growth modeling, and multilevel structural equation modeling. Bob's articles on these topics have appeared in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Organizational Behavior Human Decision Processes, Organizational Research Methods, Organization Science, and other journals. He has served on the editorial boards of many of those journals and was the editor-in-chief of Organizational Research Methods from 2008 through 2010. He is past division chair of the Research Methods Division of the Academy of Management, and a fellow of APA, SIOP, and the Southern Management Association. Bob received the 2010 Distinguished Career Award from the Academy of Management’s Research Methods Division. Bob has taught introductory and advanced structural equation modeling (SEM) courses for over a decade within the Center for the Advancement of Research Methods and Analysis (CARMA at Wayne State University; http://carma.wayne.edu/Default.asp) both in the U.S. and overseas. He holds a PhD in Social-Organizational Psychology from the University of Georgia. Finally, and vastly more important than any and all of the above, Bob is married to his best friend, Carole, and has three adult children, Drew (with a wonderful wife, Catherine), Kaity and Jackson, three very spoiled dogs, and rides his Harley-Davidson with a passion every day.

Jason L. Huang, Michigan State University, coordinator.

 


FRIDAY SEMINAR 2: The Benefits (and Costs) of Giving Your Employees Voice

BUSINESS CREDIT

April 15, 2016, 8:00 am - 11:00 am - Room 205 B

Presenters:

Linn Van Dyne, Michigan State University and Ethan Burris, University of Texas at Austin

Coordinator:

Kisha Jones, Pennsylvania State University

Abstract:

This session is designed to help practitioners apply the latest research techniques on specific action steps employees and managers can use to make sure organizations benefit from employee suggestions for change. Also, participants will work in small groups to identify pressing areas where their organizations need more research on voice.

Full Description:

This session is designed to help practitioners (both employees and managers) learn about the latest research on specific action steps employees and managers can take to make sure organizations benefit from employee suggestions for change. The session is designed to be relevant to 1) employees who are frustrated by organizational responses to their suggestions for change, 2) Human Resources professionals who want to take actions or design training programs so that managers in their organization are more responsive to employee suggestions for change, and 3) consultants who offer interventions and/or coaching to organizations on how to manage bottom-up change processes.

Intended Audience:

The seminar is intended for human resource professionals, managers, and employees at a post-graduate level. No specific content knowledge is required.

Learning Objectives:

  • Demonstrate effective and ineffective approaches for employees to use when speaking up with suggestions for change (by practicing in dyads).
  • Demonstrate effective and ineffective techniques for managers to use when listening to and responding to employee suggestions for change (by practicing in dyads).
  • Identify critical areas where additional research is needed on voice to make sure organizations benefit from employee suggestions for change.

Presenter Biographies:

Dr. Linn Van Dyne is Professor of Management at the Eli Broad Graduate School of Management at Michigan State University. Her primary research interests include proactive employee behaviors (e.g., helping and voice organizational citizenship behaviors), cultural intelligence, international organizational behavior, and the effects of work context and roles on employee behavior. She teaches courses in organizational behavior, leadership development, and international management. Before pursuing her academic career, she held a variety of managerial positions (e.g., Director of World-Wide Human Resources, Director of Compensation, Benefits, and International Personnel) in for-profit manufacturing firms and not-for-profit service organizations. She is also an entrepreneur and has participated in several entrepreneurial ventures – including her current work with the Cultural Intelligence Center. Dr. Van Dyne earned her MBA and PhD degrees from the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. She has published her research in Journal of Applied Psychology, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Group and Organization Management, Human Relations, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, British Journal of Social Psychology, Academy of Management Learning and Education, Journal of Management Education, Research in Organizational Behavior, and other outlets. She has presented her research in over 155 professional sessions throughout the world. Dr. Van Dyne co-edited the Handbook of Cultural Intelligence: Theory, Measurement, and Application. She is a Fellow of the Society of Organizational Behavior and is a member of numerous professional organizations, including SIOP and Academy of Management. She has served as Associate Editor for Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes since 2007 and has also served as Consulting Editor for Journal of Applied Psychology and Journal of Organizational Behavior.

Dr. Ethan Burris is an Associate Professor of Management and the Thomas E. & Terry Smith Faculty Fellow in Business at the McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas at Austin.  He is also the Graduate Advisor (Director of the PhD program for the Management Department) and Co-Director of the Center of Leadership Excellence for the McCombs School. He earned his Ph.D. in Management from Cornell University. He teaches and consults on topics relating to leadership, managing power and politics, building engagement in groups and teams, social enterprise, and negotiations. The recipient of numerous research and teaching awards, Dr. Burris received the McCombs School Award for Research Excellence in 2015, the Fawn and Vijay Mahajan Teaching Excellence Award for Executive Education in 2015, and many others. Dr. Burris’ current research focuses on understanding 1) the antecedents and consequences of employees speaking up or staying silent in organizations, 2) leadership behaviors, processes and outcomes, and 3) the effective management of conflict generated by multiple interests and perspectives. His research has appeared in several top management and psychology journals, such as Administrative Science Quarterly, Academy of Management Journal, Organization Science, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology and Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, and has been covered in major media outlets such as the Harvard Business Review, New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, and the Houston Chronicle. Dr. Burris has collected data from and served as a consultant for a variety of professional firms, ranging from a Fortune 100 insurance company, Fortune 500 companies in the casual dining and semiconductor technology industries, several financial services organizations, hospitals, a defense contracting company, a commercial real estate firm, governmental agencies, and many retail organizations.

Kisha Jones, Pennsylvania State University, coordinator.

 


FRIDAY SEMINAR 3: Careless Survey Responding

April 15, 2016, 11:30 am - 2:30 pm - Room 205 A

Presenters:

Adam W. Meade, North Carolina State University and Paul G. Curran, APTMetrics, Inc.

Coordinator:

Meghan Thornton, University of Texas at San Antonio

Abstract:

Careless responding on surveys introduces error into datasets and can affect estimates of reliability, factor structure, as well as results of hypothesis testing. This seminar will address (1) potential causes of careless responding, (2) method of identifying careless responding, and (3) recommendations for data handling prior to analysis.

Full Description:

This session will review several aspects of survey careless response. First we will discuss different types of careless response (random vs systematic). Second, we will discuss the potential effects of careless responses in survey data. Third, we will discuss potential causes of careless response (such as lack of respondent engagement, survey length, etc.). Fourth, we will discuss methods to identify careless responses using both post hoc and a priori methods. Last we will discuss potential ways to prevent and/or mitigate against careless responses.

Intended Audience:

The intended audience is anyone doing survey research, especially those in situations in which respondents may not be highly motivated.  Basic knowledge of correlation at a post-graduate level is required.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the difference in random vs systematic careless responses
  • Discuss the potential consequences that careless response can have on the properties of the data
  • List potential psychological causes of careless responses in survey data
  • Compute indicators that can be used to identify careless respondents
  • Describe strategies to mitigate or prevent careless responses

Presenter Biographies:

Adam W. Meade, is a Professor of Psychology at North Carolina State University. Adam completed his Ph.D. in Applied Psychology from the University of Georgia. His areas of research center on innovative methods to address psychometric issues in organizational research.  His work has focused on methodological tools related to investigating invariance using both confirmatory factor analysis and item response theory. More recently, his work has focused on the causes, outcomes, and method of detecting careless responding among survey respondents. He also invented the rapid response method of personality and trait assessment. In addition to his research, Adam is the owner and founder of Scientific Organizational Solutions (SOS), and consulting and testing company located in Raleigh, North Carolina. SOS focuses on personality assessment and the development of computer adaptive tests. Adam is a Fellow of the Association for Psychology Science and the Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology. His work has been published in numerous journals including: Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Research Methods, and Psychological Methods. He has won several research awards, and serves as Principal Investigator for NC State’s ongoing contract with O*NET. He serves as an Associated Editor at Organizational Research Methods and on the editorial boards of Journal of Applied Psychology and Applied Psychological Measurement.

Paul G. Curran is a consultant at APTMetrics. Before joining APTMetrics, he was a visiting assistant professor of Psychology and Mathematics & Statistics at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. He holds a Ph.D. in Organizational Psychology from Michigan State University. Dr. Curran's main research interests are in the area of psychological measurement, focusing on improving measurement in both surveys and tests. He has been involved in research on the detection of careless responding for a number of years, and presented work at SIOP and through peer-reviewed publications.

 

Meghan Thornton, University of Texas at San Antonio, coordinator.

 


FRIDAY SEMINAR 4: Effective Organizational Socialization and Onboarding

SOLD OUT - WAIT LIST ONLY

April 15, 2016, 11:30 am - 2:30 pm - Room 205 B

Presenters:

Will Shepherd, The Wendy’s Company and Allison M. Ellis, Portland State University

Coordinator:

David Cadiz, Portland State University
  
Abstract:

Effective organizational socialization and onboarding of new hires can reduce employee turnover and increase employee engagement and productivity. This seminar will provide a model for analyzing an organization’s onboarding and socialization processes, review academic and applied research on organizational socialization, and share best practices for effective onboarding and socialization programs.

Full Description:

Effective organizational socialization and onboarding of new hires can reduce employee turnover and increase employee engagement and productivity. This seminar is designed to help you: analyze an organization's socialization and onboarding processes; utilize current research when developing effective organizational socialization and onboarding practices; and apply industry best practices when implementing organizational socialization and onboarding programs. We will review: (1) conceptual onboarding models and approaches; (2) research on new hire personal characteristics and behaviors that lead to higher early-tenure adjustment levels; and (3) best practices for using orientation programs, training, mentoring, etc. to assimilate new hires into the organizational culture.

Intended Audience:

This seminar is intended for a general audience at a post-graduate level; no specific content knowledge is required.

Learning Objectives:

  • Analyze an organization's socialization and onboarding processes
  • Utilize current research when developing effective organizational socialization and onboarding practices
  • Apply industry best practices when implementing organizational socialization and onboarding programs

Presenter Biography:

Will Shepherd is currently the Director of Enterprise Learning & Development at Wendy’s Restaurants. Prior to joining Wendy’s, he worked at Huntington National Bank where he had a wide range of roles and talent management responsibilities, including talent acquisition processes, talent development, organizational culture, and employee retention. Prior to Huntington, he worked for Personnel Decisions International where he consulted to a wide variety of industries and Fortune 500 organizations. He started his career at Verizon in the Employee Selection and Competency Development Group. Shepherd received his Ph.D. in I-O psychology with a minor in quantitative psychology at Bowling Green State University. He received his bachelor's degree in finance and psychology from The University of Northern Iowa. He is a licensed psychologist and a Fellow of both the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology and American Psychological Association. He has also served as an adjunct professor at Bowling Green State University, Concordia (MN), Minnesota State University, Kent State University, and The Ohio State University teaching at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. His research has been published in academic journals including the Academy of Management Journal, Personnel Psychology, and the International Journal of Selection and Assessment. He also has contributed as a subject matter expert on HR topics for various media outlets including National Public Radio and HR Magazine. As part of his applied work, he has designed and implemented onboarding programs and processes at multiple organizational levels from front-line employees to executives. He was the keynote speaker for a “Best Practices in Onboarding” seminar hosted by Bowling Green State University, he co-presented the “Onboarding for Success - Challenges and Opportunities” webinar hosted by The Conference Board, and presented “Choosing the Right Inputs for Onboarding Success” at the Onboarding Leadership Conference hosted by The Conference Board in New York City.

Allison M. Ellis is an adjunct professor of Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management at Portland State University and serves as an independent research consultant to the Oregon Healthy Workforce Center at Oregon Health & Science University, Sentis, an Australia based consultancy focused on safety, well-being, and operational excellence, and the Center for Parental Leave Leadership, an organization providing consulting and coaching to organizations regarding the family leave process. She has also served in an Employee Development role at Logitech where she designed and implemented an onboarding program for new employees and led a program focused on onboarding and enriching developmental experiences for interns while at Logitech. Ellis received her Ph.D. in I-O psychology with a minor in occupational health psychology at Portland State University. She received her bachelor’s degree in psychology and social behavior from the University of California, Irvine. Her research has been published in academic journals including the Journal of Management, the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, and Organizational Dynamics. Her most recent project has been the design of a weekly diary study with a local transportation authority that will take place over the first 30 weeks of new drivers’ tenure. The aim of the research is to identify critical stressors during this phase and their impact on the health and safety of new drivers, as well as examine important socialization-related resources that play a mitigating role in this process.

David Cadiz, Portland State University, coordinator.

 


FRIDAY SEMINAR 5: Big Data Predictive Analytics: A Hands-On Workshop Using R

SOLD OUT - WAIT LIST ONLY

April 15, 2016, 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm - Room 205 A

Presenters:

Fred Oswald, Rice University and Dan J. Putka, HumRRO

Coordinator:

John Fleenor, Center for Creative Leadership

Abstract:

Attendees will learn how to apply several modern prediction models and algorithms that have helped characterize the Big Data revolution in organizations (e.g., random forests, gradient boosted trees). Workshop attendees will apply these methods using RStudio and the R programming language. Sample code and data sets will be provided.

Full Description:

The big data revolution has pervaded multiple research disciplines (e.g., medicine, education, physics, engineering), and it has found its way into I-O psychology and into organizations as well. It is called a 'revolution' because present-day technology provides unprecedented power to collect, manage, and analyze large feeds of data continuously. Of focus in this workshop will be several sophisticated statistical models and algorithms that have gained more visibility as part of the big data movement but are still rarely used by I-O psychologists. These techniques can be used to predict important organizational outcomes (e.g., aspects of job performance, job satisfaction, and turnover) from a wide range of available (and potentially messy) data pertaining to employees, teams, managers, and organizational roles and processes. Workshop participants will learn how to apply these predictive models and algorithms using freely available software (the R programming language).

Intended Audience:

This seminar is intended for a general audience at a post-graduate level having a working knowledge and comfort with using statistical software to fit regression models.

Learning Objectives:

  • Compare traditional data analysis/models with innovative algorithms/models that are useful for big data.
  • Use the RStudio program to apply innovative algorithms/models in predicting outcomes using sample data sets.
  • Use RStudio to help interpret and compare results from various modern prediction methods.
  • Write results from these innovative algorithms/models in a manner that is clear and compelling to both researchers and practitioners.

Presenter Biographies:

Dr. Fred Oswald is a Professor of I-O Psychology at Rice University. His research, publications, and grants address personnel selection and psychological testing in organizational, education and military settings. Substantively, his work deals with defining, modeling and predicting societally relevant outcomes (e.g., job performance, academic performance, satisfaction, turnover) from psychological measures (e.g., cognitive abilities, personality traits, situational judgment tests, job knowledge and skill, and biographical data). His statistical work (e.g., predictive modeling, meta-analysis, structural equation modeling, and adverse impact) informs personnel selection issues in the research, practice and legal arenas. Dr. Oswald serves as Associate Editor for Journal of Management, Psychological Methods, Research Synthesis Methods, and Journal of Research in Personality, and he serves on 9 editorial boards. He is a Fellow of SIOP, APA, and APS, and he received his PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from the University of Minnesota.

Dr. Dan J. Putka is a Principal Staff Scientist at the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) in Alexandria, Virginia. He has over a decade of hands-on experience developing and evaluating assessments for selection and promotion, and managing and modeling large, messy archival datasets for purposes of predicting and understanding key outcomes such as job performance, turnover, counterproductive work behavior, and job satisfaction. Aside from his client centered work, Dan has maintained an active presence in the I-O psychology scientific community having authored numerous book chapters and journals articles on a variety of methods-related topics, and serving on the editorial boards of four journals. He is a past-president of the Personnel Testing Council of Metropolitan Washington, and a fellow of APA and three of its divisions (5, 14, and 19). Dan received his Ph.D. in I-O psychology with a specialization in quantitative methods from Ohio University.

John Fleenor, Center for Creative Leadership, coordinator.

 


FRIDAY SEMINAR 6: Integrating the Science of Employee Health, Wellbeing, and Safety into I-O Psychology Practice

April 15, 2016, 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm - Room 205 B

Presenters:

David Ballard, American Psychological Association, Autumn Krauss, Sentis, and Robert Sinclair, Clemson University

Coordinator:

Lindsay Sears, Healthways

Abstract:

This seminar's purpose is to enhance I-O psychology practice through the incorporation of principles from research on employee work-life balance, wellbeing, safety, and physical and psychological health promotion. Experts will guide participants through a series of case study examples, best practices, and facilitated job crafting and change implementation exercises.

Full Description:

This seminar will focus on increasing the scope and utility of I-O psychology practice through the incorporation of timely concepts and principles from the expanding body of research on work-life balance, wellbeing, safety, and physical and psychological health promotion. Beginning with a foundational overview of Occupational Health Psychology, three experts will guide participants through a series of case study examples, best practices, and facilitated job crafting and change implementation exercises. This interactive learning session will give participants new knowledge and skills needed to apply evidence-based strategies focused on protecting and promoting worker health, enhancing the value they bring to organizations.

Intended Audience:

This seminar is intended for a general audience at a post-graduate level; no specific content knowledge is required.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss key concepts, models, and theories from Occupational Health Psychology (OHP; work-life balance, stress, safety, physical and psychological health promotion) and their value for individuals, organizations, and communities.
  • Apply key concepts from Occupational Health Psychology to Industrial and Organizational Practice through case study examples.
  • Identify obstacles and sources of resistance specifically associated with implementing OHP initiatives in practice, and develop strategies to overcome these.
  • Build a personalized action plan to incorporate OHP concepts and tools into your role (e.g., job crafting) and/or into organizations with which you work.

Presenter Biographies:

David W. Ballard, PsyD, MBA, is assistant executive director for organizational excellence at APA. He provides leadership, direction, evaluation and management for all activities related to APA’s Center for Organizational Excellence, which works to benefit society and improve people’s lives through the application of psychology to workplace issues. The Center houses APA’s Psychologically Healthy Workplace Program (PHWP), a public education initiative designed to engage the employer community, raise public awareness about the value psychology brings to the workplace and promote programs and policies that enhance employee well-being and organizational performance. Dr. Ballard has provided research, consultation and training services to government agencies, corporations, medical schools and universities in the areas of workplace health and productivity, public health, prevention and health care finance and has experience in management, marketing and consumer research. He is currently on the board of directors of The Health Project/C. Everett Koop National Health Awards. He previously served on the board of directors for the Health Enhancement Research Organization and the External Advisory Board for the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, as well as on workplace advisory bodies for the National Business Group on Health and Partnership for Prevention. Dr. Ballard received his doctorate in clinical psychology and his MBA in health and medical services administration from Widener University, where he completed concentrations in organizational and forensic psychology.

Dr. Autumn Krauss, Ph.D. is Chief Scientist at Sentis, an organizational consultancy based in Brisbane, Australia. In her role, she manages the global Research Team and directs the Sentis Academy, Sentis’ division for academic and research partnerships. The Research Team is responsible for conducting qualitative and quantitative diagnostic assessments to evaluate organizations’ safety and wellbeing culture, ensuring that Sentis’ wellbeing and safety interventions are evidence-based, and partnering with academicians and client organizations to conduct applied research focused on furthering the discipline of Occupational Health Psychology. Autumn has spoken on workplace safety and wellbeing topics in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australasia for organizations such as the American Society of Safety Engineers, the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health, and the Safety Institute of Australia. Her applied research programs have been funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and the Society for Human Resource Management. For Autumn’s scientist and practitioner contributions, she has been recognized with the Early Career Achievement Award jointly given by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the American Psychological Association, and the Society for Occupational Health Psychology. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology with a specialization in Occupational Health Psychology from Colorado State University. 

Robert R. Sinclair, Ph.D. is a Professor of Industrial-Organizational Psychology at Clemson University. He received his doctoral degree in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from Wayne State University in 1995. Prior to joining the faculty at Clemson he was a member of the faculty at Portland State University and the University of Tulsa. Dr. Sinclair is a founding member and Past-President of the Society for Occupational Health Psychology and a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology and American Psychological Association. He currently serves as Associate Editor of the Journal of Business and Psychology and as an Editorial Board Member of the Journal of Management, Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, and Accident Analysis and Prevention. He has edited four published volumes including Contemporary Occupational Health Psychology: Global Perspectives on Research and Practice (Vol. 2 & 3, with Jonathan Houdmont and Stavroula Leka), Research Methods in Occupational Health Psychology: Measurement, Design, and Data Analysis (with Mo Wang and Lois Tetrick), and Building Psychological Resilience in Military Personnel: Theory and Practice (with Tom Britt). Dr. Sinclair’s research focuses on Occupational Health Psychology including topics such as work stress, economic stress, psychological resilience, and employee retention. His work has appeared in such journals as the Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, and the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology.

Lindsay Sears, Healthways, coordinator.

 


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