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2018 SIOP Annual Conference

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193What Gets Published? Experimentally Manipulating Implicit Expectations of ReviewersThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
What Gets Published? Experimentally Manipulating Implicit Expectations of Reviewers
The use of hedges (i.e. words that create vagueness) in submitted manuscripts seems to be expected by editors and reviewers of high impact I-O journals. However, previous research cannot establish causality. This experiment provided first evidence that authors’ use of hedges impacts reviewers’ (N = 96) recommendation for publication. Results also suggest that this expectation is rather implicit.
Presenters
Nida ul Habib Bajwa
Universität des Saarlandes
Cornelius J. König
Universität des Saarlandes
Hannah Honecker
Universität des Saarlandes
Markus Langer
Universität des Saarlandes
194Within-Person Increases in Careless Responding During Questionnaire CompletionThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Within-Person Increases in Careless Responding During Questionnaire Completion
This study (N = 381) found that participants respond more carelessly as they progress further into a questionnaire, that increased carelessness was accompanied by increased resource depletion, and that participants who were warned that carelessness would be punished displayed smaller increases in carelessness. These findings provide insights into the causes and prevention of careless responding.
Presenters
Nathan A. Bowling
Wright State University
Anthony Gibson
Wright State University
Joseph W. Houpt
Wright State University
Cheyna Brower
Wright State University
195High School Experiences Predict First-Year College STEM OutcomesThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
High School Experiences Predict First-Year College STEM Outcomes
College freshman in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) majors were surveyed over their first school year. For all 3 time periods, there were significant medium-sized correlations between high school teacher influence and learning orientation, and between high school coursework preparation and self-efficacy.
Presenters
Brittany Bradford
Rice University
Margaret E. Beier
Rice University
196Listening to the Employee Voice: Pulse Survey and Daily Diary PracticesThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Listening to the Employee Voice: Pulse Survey and Daily Diary Practices
Employee voice has been redefined beyond annual surveys, with a shift to more continuous approaches. This submission discusses 2 major approaches to continuous listening among practitioners and academics (pulse surveys and daily diaries) and to further the conversation on how both fields can collaborate on ideas and methodologies.
Presenters
Jim M. Burlak
KPMG
Jenna C. Shapiro
Cigna
Cameron Klein
PwC
197Impact of Different Theoretical Mechanisms on Optimal Time Lags in I-O Panel DesignsThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Impact of Different Theoretical Mechanisms on Optimal Time Lags in I-O Panel Designs
Authors analyzed how different stress mechanisms (e.g., accumulation, adaptation) affect the significance of cross-lagged effects over a range of possible time lags. Even under extreme stable conditions (e.g., stable stressors and accumulating strains), optimal time lags to achieve significance turned out to be much smaller than researcher might expect. Results also apply to other I-O areas.
Presenters
Christian Dormann
Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz
198Suggested Methods for Use of the Amazon MTurk Platform for Aptitude Test DevelopmentThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Suggested Methods for Use of the Amazon MTurk Platform for Aptitude Test Development
The Amazon Turk crowdsourcing platform was used to support a successful development phase of a battery of cognitive ability (aptitude) tests. Compared to traditional alternatives, workers provided a greater amount of complete, high quality data and at a lower cost. Test distributions and reliabilities were comparable to that of offline participants who had completed similar tests.
Presenters
Kevin A. Field
Ball Foundation/Career Vision
Victoria M. Harmon
Ball Foundation/Career Vision
199The Bigs Project: An Evaluation of a High School Employability Skills InterventionThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
The Bigs Project: An Evaluation of a High School Employability Skills Intervention
The Bigs program addresses the student employability skills gap by developing critical career skills and competencies. Using Kirkpatrick's (1979) training evaluation framework, authors meta-analytically examined the Bigs effect on student reactions, learning, transfer, and results across 26 samples. Findings support social cognitive career theory and show promise for career development research.
Presenters
David R. Glerum
The Ohio State Univeristy
Timothy A. Judge
Ohio State University Fisher College of Business
200Late Responders to Military Online Occupational Health SurveysThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Late Responders to Military Online Occupational Health Surveys
This study examines response timing on resistance behaviors, substantive survey results, and nonresponse bias. Online occupational health screenings were available to 2 U.S. Air Force wings for a 9-week period. Late responders showed higher rates of resistance behaviors and similar rates for quality of responses, burnout, and psychological distress.
Presenters
Tanya Goodman
Neurostat Analytical Solutions, LLC
Lillian Prince
Prince Research & Analytic Services, LLC
Wayne Chappelle
U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine
William Thompson
Neurostat Analytical Solutions
201MTurk as a Viable Source for Organizational and Occupational Health ResearchThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
MTurk as a Viable Source for Organizational and Occupational Health Research
This poster examined the viability of using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) workers for research by assessing their labor market characteristics and other organizational and occupational health variables in a multiwave study. Findings indicated that workers come from diverse labor markets, and effect size magnitudes provide evidence for attaining reliable and stable data from MTurk.
Presenters
Paige E. Hartman
Austin Independent School District
Anna J. Lorys
Auburn University
Sadie K. O'Neill
reConnect HR
Jesse S. Michel
Auburn University
202Can Mentoring Help Job Seekers to Be More Active? A Moderated Mediation ModelThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Can Mentoring Help Job Seekers to Be More Active? A Moderated Mediation Model
This study examined the influence of the mentoring functions on individuals’ job search. Results indicated that job search self-efficacy mediated the positive influence of mentoring functions on job search behavior. Additionally, normative beliefs moderated the mediating effect of job search self-efficacy on the mentoring functions–job search behavior relationship when normative beliefs were high.
Presenters
Kuo-Yang Kao
National Chiao Tung University
Hao-Hsin Hsu, Ph.D.
Xiaocong Li
Huaiyin Normal University
Ruirui Lian
Anhui Jianzhu University
203Career Development Practices in a Global EconomyThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Career Development Practices in a Global Economy
I-Os have entered an international era where the need for dynamic, globally equipped, adaptive employees has become increasingly necessary to the success of organizations. This study compared 2,870 individuals across 46 nations to identify the career development practices they used and their relationship to job satisfaction.
Presenters
Nathan Iverson
California Baptist University
204Linking Mentoring to Career Plateau: The Mediating Role of Well-BeingThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Linking Mentoring to Career Plateau: The Mediating Role of Well-Being
This study investigated the relationships among mentoring functions, job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, and career plateau. Results indicated that career mentoring was related to decreased emotional exhaustion and career plateau. Moreover, the relationship between career mentoring and career plateau was mediated by job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion.
Presenters
Kuo-Yang Kao
National Chiao Tung University
Hui-Ting Lee
National Chiao Tung University
Ines Dax
National Chiao Tung University
205Work-Value Profile and Career OutcomesThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Work-Value Profile and Career Outcomes
Latent profile analysis was used to model the conjoint effects of intrinsic and extrinsic work values reported by a cohort of lawyers. Five work-value profiles emerged, with gender being an antecedent to profile membership. The profiles were meaningfully associated with practice setting and salary, thus providing support for the utility of the person-centered approach in studying work values.
Presenters
Chee Wee Koh
Public Service Division, Singapore
206Cross-Cultural Differences in Job and Retirement Attitudes in the U.S and South KoreaThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Cross-Cultural Differences in Job and Retirement Attitudes in the U.S and South Korea
The study examines how job satisfaction and job security relate to retirement satisfaction differently in the U.S and South Korea. Results showed that there was a significant positive relationship between job security and retirement satisfaction for Americans, but there was no significant relationship for the Korean sample.
Presenters
Soohyun Lee
The Graduate Center & Baruch College, CUNY
Peter P. Yu
Goldman Sachs
207The Effect of ROPES and Gratitude on Newcomers’ Psychological Contract Breach ChangeThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
The Effect of ROPES and Gratitude on Newcomers’ Psychological Contract Breach Change
A longitudinal field study was conducted to test the effect of ROPES intervention and trait gratitude on a group of new nurses’ psychological contract breach change during the first-year post-entry. Results showed that both intervention and gratitude could help reduce newcomers’ psychological contract breach, but the interactional effect of the 2 variables on breach was not found.
Presenters
Hairong Li
Auburn University
Jinyan Fan
Auburn University
Melissa J. Stuhlman
Auburn University
Xiang Yao
Peking University
Lu Zheng
Auburn University
208The Role of Workplace Orientation Perceptions on Orientation SatisfactionThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
The Role of Workplace Orientation Perceptions on Orientation Satisfaction
This study examined how new hires’ perceptions of their orientation program affected orientation satisfaction. Results showed that satisfaction with the orientation’s components, orientation effectiveness, perceived understanding of the agency’s mission after orientation, and perceived role clarity after orientation were significantly related to orientation satisfaction.
Presenters
Benjamin E. Liberman, Ph.D.
U.S. Office of Personnel Management
Choe E Shannon
University at Albany, SUNY
Andrew DeCesare
University at Albany, SUNY
209Predictors of Satisfaction With the Hiring Process Among Federal New HiresThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Predictors of Satisfaction With the Hiring Process Among Federal New Hires
This study examined how new hires’ perceptions of their agencies’ hiring process affected their overall perceived satisfaction with the hiring process. Results showed that perceived ease of the hiring process, hiring timeliness, and hiring-related customer service but not hiring communication were significantly related to hiring process satisfaction.
Presenters
Benjamin E. Liberman, Ph.D.
U.S. Office of Personnel Management
Choe E Shannon
University at Albany, SUNY
Andrew DeCesare
University at Albany, SUNY
210Directive Leadership and Newcomer Socialization: A Dynamic ApproachThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Directive Leadership and Newcomer Socialization: A Dynamic Approach
This study investigated how directive leadership changes over time and how the change affects change in newcomer socialization outcomes (i.e., role clarity and job anxiety) with a longitudinal 4-wave study. Moreover, individual Chinese traditionality (i.e., to what extent individuals adhere to Chinese traditional values) was examined as a moderator of the effects of directive leadership change.
Presenters
Han Liu
Huazhong University of Science & Technology
Haijiang Wang
Huazhong University of Sciences and Technology
Feng Jiang, Ph.D.
Central University of Finance and Economics
Jianqiao Liao
Huazhong University of Science&Technology
211Enhancing Perspective and Authenticity to Improve Age-Diverse Mentoring RelationshipsThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Enhancing Perspective and Authenticity to Improve Age-Diverse Mentoring Relationships
The aging of the workforce creates opportunities for experienced employees to transmit their expertise to younger employees via mentoring, but age-dissimilar interactions bring challenging interpersonal dynamics. A model is proposed in which the effects of age dissimilarity on the mentoring relationship is mediated by metastereotyping and identity management, and suggest 2 interventions.
Presenters
Hannah Markell-Goldstein
Capital One
Sara Barth
University of Maryland, College Park
Eden B. King
Rice University
Jennifer L. Wessel
University of Maryland - College Park
212Mentor–Mentee Agreement on Relationship Characteristics, Attitudes, and OutcomesThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Mentor–Mentee Agreement on Relationship Characteristics, Attitudes, and Outcomes
This study examined mentor–mentee agreement on a variety relationship and outcomes variables. Findings indicate mentor–mentee agreement is high on objective characteristics but only moderate on more subjective variables. This suggests that researchers should collect data on subjective and attitudinal variables from both parties to fully understand the relationships among mentoring variables.
Presenters
Alyssa D. Marshall
Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO)
Melanie E. Kramer
Colorado State University
Dorey S. Chaffee
Colorado State University
Kurt Kraiger
University of Memphis
213A Sound Model for International Employee SurveysThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
A Sound Model for International Employee Surveys
Organizations more and more utilize employee survey data for EbM and change management. However, survey models are often underdeveloped in structure (specifying variables but not their interactions) and seldom systematically validated. Synthesizing results of 123 meta-analyses, 7 possible models are proposed and comparatively tested by applying meta-meta-analytic structural equation modeling.
Presenters
Björn Dominik Matthaei
Daimler AG
Felix C. Brodbeck
LMU München
214When Is the Retired More Satisfied? A Multilevel Analysis Across 43 CountriesThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
When Is the Retired More Satisfied? A Multilevel Analysis Across 43 Countries
Multilevel analyses across 43 countries (N = 7939) based on World Values Survey wave 6 were conducted to investigate the predictors of life satisfaction among retirees. Main findings were financial situation, health, life conditions, feelings of control, and having a spouse were the main predictors of life satisfaction. Several cross-level interactions with country characteristics were reported.
Presenters
Afife Basak Ok
Ankara University
Yonca Toker
Middle East Technical University
215Not all Vocational Interest Inventories Are Equal: A Multitrait–Multimethod StudyThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Not all Vocational Interest Inventories Are Equal: A Multitrait–Multimethod Study
This study addressed convergent validity in measures of vocational interests via a multitrait–multimethod analysis on 4 interest inventories and 6 RIASEC traits. Results show fairly large trait loadings (average = .8; good convergent validity) but non-negligible method loadings (average = .4). In contrast to scale scores, high point codes exhibit lower levels of agreement (average kappa = .4).
Presenters
Wei Ming Jonathan Phan
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Kisha S. Jones
Pennsylvania State University
Mary Russell
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Daniel A. Newman
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
James Rounds
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Phil M Lewis
O*NET Development Center
216Beta Coefficients Don’t Impute Missing Correlations Well in Meta-Analytic ResearchThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Beta Coefficients Don’t Impute Missing Correlations Well in Meta-Analytic Research
Peterson and Brown (2005) suggested that researchers could use standardized regression weights (i.e., beta coefficients) to impute missing zero-order correlations in meta-analyses. This study demonstrates with actual meta-analytic data that betas do not impute zero-order correlations very well. Researchers should refrain from using beta estimation procedures in meta-analysis.
Presenters
Philip L. Roth
Clemson University
Huy Le
University of Texas at San Antonio
In-Sue Oh
Temple University
Chad H. Van Iddekinge
Florida State University
Philip Bobko
Gettysburg College
217Effects of Religion and Spirituality on Career Calling PerceptionsThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Effects of Religion and Spirituality on Career Calling Perceptions
This poster examined how individual differences in religiosity and spirituality relate to career calling perceptions and downstream criteria. Contradicting previous research, results show that nondenominational spirituality is a stronger predictor of callings than denominational religiosity. Spirituality had indirect effects on vocational outcomes via the presence of, and search for, a calling.
Presenters
Shivani Shah
The Graduate Center & Baruch College, CUNY
Jason Dahling
The College of New Jersey
Mindi N. Thompson
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Katharine Hansel
The College of New Jersey