austinheader

Helpful hints

Searching for a presenter: Click on the search box and start typing the last name of the presenter.

Searching for a content area: First choose an area of Relevance, then search for a content area.

2018 SIOP Annual Conference

TitleDayTimeDurationRoomProgram
Data pager
Data pager
First PagePrevious Page
12
Next PageLast Page
Page size:
PageSizeComboBox
select
 30 items in 2 pages
213A Sound Model for International Employee SurveysThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
A Sound Model for International Employee Surveys
Organizations more and more utilize employee survey data for EbM and change management. However, survey models are often underdeveloped in structure (specifying variables but not their interactions) and seldom systematically validated. Synthesizing results of 123 meta-analyses, 7 possible models are proposed and comparatively tested by applying meta-meta-analytic structural equation modeling.
Presenters
Björn Dominik Matthaei
Daimler AG
Felix C. Brodbeck
LMU München
214When Is the Retired More Satisfied? A Multilevel Analysis Across 43 CountriesThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
When Is the Retired More Satisfied? A Multilevel Analysis Across 43 Countries
Multilevel analyses across 43 countries (N = 7939) based on World Values Survey wave 6 were conducted to investigate the predictors of life satisfaction among retirees. Main findings were financial situation, health, life conditions, feelings of control, and having a spouse were the main predictors of life satisfaction. Several cross-level interactions with country characteristics were reported.
Presenters
Afife Basak Ok
Ankara University
Yonca Toker
Middle East Technical University
215Not all Vocational Interest Inventories Are Equal: A Multitrait–Multimethod StudyThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Not all Vocational Interest Inventories Are Equal: A Multitrait–Multimethod Study
This study addressed convergent validity in measures of vocational interests via a multitrait–multimethod analysis on 4 interest inventories and 6 RIASEC traits. Results show fairly large trait loadings (average = .8; good convergent validity) but non-negligible method loadings (average = .4). In contrast to scale scores, high point codes exhibit lower levels of agreement (average kappa = .4).
Presenters
Wei Ming Jonathan Phan
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Kisha S. Jones
Florida International University
Mary Russell
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Daniel A. Newman
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Ph.D. in I-O Psychology
James Rounds
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Phil M Lewis
O*NET Development Center
216Beta Coefficients Don’t Impute Missing Correlations Well in Meta-Analytic ResearchThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Beta Coefficients Don’t Impute Missing Correlations Well in Meta-Analytic Research
Peterson and Brown (2005) suggested that researchers could use standardized regression weights (i.e., beta coefficients) to impute missing zero-order correlations in meta-analyses. This study demonstrates with actual meta-analytic data that betas do not impute zero-order correlations very well. Researchers should refrain from using beta estimation procedures in meta-analysis.
Presenters
Philip L. Roth
Clemson University
Huy Le
University of Texas at San Antonio
In-Sue Oh
Temple University
Chad H. Van Iddekinge
University of Iowa
Philip Bobko
Gettysburg College
217Effects of Religion and Spirituality on Career Calling PerceptionsThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Effects of Religion and Spirituality on Career Calling Perceptions
This poster examined how individual differences in religiosity and spirituality relate to career calling perceptions and downstream criteria. Contradicting previous research, results show that nondenominational spirituality is a stronger predictor of callings than denominational religiosity. Spirituality had indirect effects on vocational outcomes via the presence of, and search for, a calling.
Presenters
Shivani Shah
The Graduate Center & Baruch College, CUNY
Jason Dahling
College of New Jersey
Mindi N. Thompson
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Katharine Hansel
The College of New Jersey
218Did You Check Your Data? A Preliminary Quantitative Literature ReviewThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Did You Check Your Data? A Preliminary Quantitative Literature Review
This study aims to conduct a preliminary quantitative literature review to screen the paper that did data cleaning before analysis. Results show that over half of the studies performed data cleaning, indicating the credibility of their results. However, there is still much to improve. Findings guide future studies to use more advanced screening techniques to improve the data quality.
Presenters
Qiuyu Su
University of Alabama
Justin A. DeSimone
University of Alabama
219It’s a Tradition: Longevity as Justification for Hazing New EmployeesThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
It’s a Tradition: Longevity as Justification for Hazing New Employees
Employee onboarding can take the form of employee hazing, which persists in organizations despite negative connotations. In this study (N = 107), support was observed for system justification theory in explaining the perpetuation of workplace hazing, namely that raters view long-term hazing systems as more just than recently adopted hazing systems.
Presenters
Benjamin Thomas
Radford University
Patricia Meglich
University of Nebraska at Omaha
220Vocational Interests Toward Complex Occupations Make a Difference in STEM Work LifeThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Vocational Interests Toward Complex Occupations Make a Difference in STEM Work Life
The STEM Interest Complexity Measure, measuring interests toward complex tasks under the realistic and investigative work environments, was investigated with employed engineering-scientist and technologist-technician samples. Interest levels were higher for the higher complexity engineering-scientist sample. Interest and work criteria associations were again higher for the high-complexity sample.
Presenters
Yonca Toker
Middle East Technical University
221Personality, Perceived Benefits, and Willingness to Mentor in Formal ProgramsThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Personality, Perceived Benefits, and Willingness to Mentor in Formal Programs
This study examined the relationship between perceived benefits to participating and willingness to mentor in a formal program with personality moderating. Results indicated that the relationship was more positive for those who demonstrated high levels of Conscientiousness and Openness than for those with low levels. Strategies for attracting and supporting qualified mentors are discussed.
Presenters
Kristen Thornton
Zillow Group
Dana L. Kendall
Seattle Pacific University
Scott C. Campanario
Deloitte
Mathea Krogstad
Seattle Pacific University
Vatia Caldwell
Seattle Pacific University
222Results-Blind Review: A Masked Crusader for ScienceThursday Apr 193:30 PM50 MinutesRiverwalkPoster
Results-Blind Review: A Masked Crusader for Science
The results-blind review initiative is a path to publication aimed at addressing concerns within the organizational sciences. Authors surveyed editorial board members of 7 applied psychology and management journals to understand their reactions to the initiative. There are noted advantages and disadvantages to the initiative as well as commonly held misperceptions.
Presenters
Haley Woznyj
Longwood University
Kelcie Grenier
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Roxanne Ross
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
George C. Banks
UNC Charlotte
Steven G. Rogelberg
University of North Carolina, Charlotte