austinheader

2020 SIOP Annual Conference

TitleDayTimeDurationRoomProgram
0104A Study on When and Why Psychological Contract Overfulfillment Is Not AppreciatedTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
A Study on When and Why Psychological Contract Overfulfillment Is Not Appreciated
Drawing on social projection theory, the authors proposed and tested system-justifying ideology as a boundary condition that explains when psychological contract overfulfillment does not result in positive emotion through low prosociality attribution in individualized employment relationships. Data from exploratory interviews and a survey study provided preliminary support for the theory.
Presenters
Yuenlam Bavik
Deakin Universisty
Kawon Kim
Seoul National University
Jason Shaw
Nanyang Business School
0105A Qualitative Investigation of Flow at Work: Strategies, Activities, and DisruptionsTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
A Qualitative Investigation of Flow at Work: Strategies, Activities, and Disruptions
The study examined the open-ended experiences of flow at work and linked themes discovered in participants’ answers to their self-reported flow prevalence score at work. The results provide a number of insights regarding the maximization of flow at work, including employee strategies, specific activities used, environmental factors, and disruptive factors.
Presenters
David Cassell
APTMetrics
Jared Weintraub
Deloitte
0106Faking in Trait Measures of MotivationTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
Faking in Trait Measures of Motivation
Nine instruments identified as potential measures of general motivation were assessed for response bias. Participants completed selected instruments in both honesty and fake-good conditions. Within-subjects analyses demonstrated a significant difference between faking and honesty conditions (d’s > .22) on all scales, save for the Fun-Seeking subscale of the Behavioral Activation System (d = -.09).
Presenters
Cassandra E. Colton
Ohio University
Jeffrey B. Vancouver
Ohio University
0107Trait Motivation: A Meta-Analysis of Predictive ValidityTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
Trait Motivation: A Meta-Analysis of Predictive Validity
The relationship between trait motivation and performance was assessed for 9 scales based on 92 studies (N = 32,386). The strength of the relationship varied by measure, with ρs ranging from zero to .29. The Work Preferences Inventory had the strongest correlation (ρ = .29). Discussion focuses on how the field might improve and further evaluate measures of motivation for selection purposes.
Presenters
Cassandra E. Colton
Ohio University
Jeffrey B. Vancouver
Ohio University
0109Fulfilling Their Purposes to Elicit Their BestTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
Fulfilling Their Purposes to Elicit Their Best
Two studies were conducted to advance understanding of individual purpose and the impact in the workplace. A taxonomy of purpose and a survey of purposefulness were developed in Study I. In Study II, the relations among types of purpose, purposefulness, and 2 work-related outcomes—work engagement and organizational commitment—were examined .
Presenters
Guangrong Dai
Korn Ferry
Signe Magnuson Spencer
Korn Ferry Institute
E. Susanne Blazek
Lirio
0112A Daily-Diary Examination of Work/Nonwork Need Fulfillment SpilloverTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
A Daily-Diary Examination of Work/Nonwork Need Fulfillment Spillover
The relationship between daily work and nonwork need fulfilment and their relationships with satisfaction were examined. At-work fulfilment of relatedness and autonomy needs was positively related to fulfilment outside of work. However, fulfilment outside of work did not predict the next-days’ fulfilment at work. In both domains, greater need fulfilment was associated with greater satisfaction.
Presenters
Amanda Kopydlowski
Cargill, Inc.
Aaron M. Schmidt
University of Minnesota
0113Learned Helplessness: A Control Construct With Prediction Over Locus of ControlTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
Learned Helplessness: A Control Construct With Prediction Over Locus of Control
Prior research has examined effects of locus of control (LOC) on motivational, affective, and performance outcomes at work. Authors theorized potential benefits of using learned helplessness (LH) to predict outcomes over LOC because LH captures additional control-related content. Results (N = 794) indicated that LH accounted for unique variance beyond LOC in 8 out of 9 work outcomes examined.
Presenters
Nicholas Kovacs
Mix Talent
Debra Steele-Johnson
Wright State University
Abraham Haskins
Wright State University
Kent Cooper Etherton
Wright State University
0114The Joy of Gratification: Short-Term Boost or Long-Term Success?Tuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
The Joy of Gratification: Short-Term Boost or Long-Term Success?
Authors examined the effect of promotions and pay raises on job satisfaction based on a large-scale representative German panel with 23,919 observations longitudinally across a period of 25 years. Promotions positively affected job satisfaction for no more than 1 year. Furthermore, a promotion appeared to be worth more than a 100% wage increase evaluated at the mean of income.
Presenters
Siegmar Otto
Universitaet Hohenheim
Vincent Dekker
Daimler AG
Hannah Dekker
HR Diagnostics
David Richter
German Institute for Economic Research
Sarah Zabel
Heidelberg University
0117Malleability of “Soft Skill” Competencies: Development With Entry-Level ExperienceTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
Malleability of “Soft Skill” Competencies: Development With Entry-Level Experience
Authors evaluated the longitudinal development of military recruits on 17 distinct “soft skill” competencies during their 4-year enlistment based on ratings from 1,059 technical training instructors and 6,894 first-line supervisors. Extent of development is compared and implications discussed for the prioritization of certain competencies in personnel selection rather than training or development.
Presenters
Laura G. Barron
U.S. Air Force
Mark R. Rose
U.S. Air Force
0118Leveling Up: The Effects of Branding on Gamified AssessmentsTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
Leveling Up: The Effects of Branding on Gamified Assessments
Authors utilized a 2 x 2 experimental design to examine the effects of branding during a gamified assessment. Specifically, they examined if branding was related to differences in applicant’s views of organizational attractiveness and organizational personality. Findings indicated a significant relationship between branding during gamified assessments and style (γ ̂ = .64, p = .02).
Presenters
Philip S. DeOrtentiis
Michigan State University
Zachary W. Woessner
Michigan State University
Ann Marie Ryan
Michigan State University
Nathan Thomas Brucher
Michigan State University
Christopher D. Nye
Michigan State University
Rabindra Ratan
Michigan State University
Sarah Kuang
Michigan State University
Sarena Bhatia
Kincentric
Nicholas R. Martin, PhD
Meta
Alina Siemsen
Aon's Assessment Solutions
Richard Justenhoven
Aon Assessment GmbH
Tara K. McClure
Aon
Manuel F. Gonzalez
Seton Hall University
0119How Do Organizational Cues Influence Applicant Perceptions: Identity Safety or Fit?Tuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
How Do Organizational Cues Influence Applicant Perceptions: Identity Safety or Fit?
Authors examined 2 potential mechanisms through which organizational identity cues influence minority applicant perceptions: identity safety and person organization fit. Findings indicated that mindset predicted both mechanisms and identity centrality moderated this relationship. Organizational trust and attractiveness mediated the relationship between both mechanisms and willingness to apply.
Presenters
Justin Bryan Duby
Lauren A. Collier-Spruel
Meta Platforms
Danielle D. King
Rice University
Ann Marie Ryan
Michigan State University
0123Re-Examining the Effect of Mid-Test Warnings on Faking on Personality InventoriesTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
Re-Examining the Effect of Mid-Test Warnings on Faking on Personality Inventories
This study investigates the effect of mid-test warnings on decreasing faking by expanding on the promising but limited research. Through use of a manipulation and standard 5-factor personality inventory, this study finds that mid-test warnings may be a better alternative to traditional warnings, particularly on job-relevant scales and administered solely to those who are engaged in faking.
Presenters
Irina Kuzmich
The Graduate Center, CUNY and Baruch College
Charles A. Scherbaum
Baruch College & The Graduate Center, CUNY
0125Consequences of Experienced and Observed Recruiter IncivilityTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
Consequences of Experienced and Observed Recruiter Incivility
Drawing from the literature on workplace aggression and incivility, this study investigates the effects of recruiter incivility on organizational attraction and the moderating effects of recruiter’s organizational embodiment using experimental vignette methodology. Results from 344 participants provided supports for the hypotheses. Findings and implications are discussed.
Presenters
Juseob Lee
University of Central Florida
Steve M. Jex
University of Central Florida
Mindy K. Shoss
University of Central Florida
0126Relationships Between Personality and Behavior in Employment GamesTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
Relationships Between Personality and Behavior in Employment Games
Authors investigated how the Big 5 factors of personality relate to 9 factors generated from 11 gamified assessments. Using a counterbalanced design, 1,052 adults played these gamified assessments and completed a traditional self-report measure of personality. Four of the 9 tested gameplay factors converged with 1 or more of the Big 5.
Presenters
Jenna Ellen-Marie McChesney
Meredith College
Zachary M. Roberts
Korn Ferry
Jackson Dolphin
pymetrics
Anne Thissen-Roe
pymetrics
0127Does It Matter Who You Take the Test With?Tuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
Does It Matter Who You Take the Test With?
Assessment centers usually include a leaderless group exercise where a group of individuals work together on a task. The extent to which individual performance was influenced by the composition of the AC group was examined.The presence of test takers with high preferences for assuming specific team roles accounted for a significant proportion of individual performance variance.
Presenters
Gonzalo J. Munoz
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
Lorna Andrea Cortés Urrutia
Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez
0130Fairness and Respect: Reactions to Artificial Intelligence in Employee SelectionTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
Fairness and Respect: Reactions to Artificial Intelligence in Employee Selection
Authors examined reactions to artificial intelligence in LinkedIn and interview assessments across 2 contexts: AI developed using (a) expert insights and (b) job incumbent data. Findings show significant differences in perceptions of fairness (ηp2 =.18) and interpersonal respect (ηp2 =.10) based on the combination of methods used to evaluate the assessments when compared to human-expert judgment.
Presenters
Jess C. Rigos
Hofstra University
Kevin Nolan
Hofstra University
0131Discrimination via the Questions Asked During Job Interviews: Role of XenophobiaTuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
Discrimination via the Questions Asked During Job Interviews: Role of Xenophobia
The effects of candidates’ perceived nationality and acculturation on interviewers’ intentions to ask questions assessing person–job and person–organization fit were examined. Interviewers intend to ask more questions about person–organization fit and less questions about person–job fit to foreign candidates, especially when they had low acculturation and interviewers’ xenophobia was high.
Presenters
Aditi Rabindra Sachdev
Wonder
Kevin Nolan
Hofstra University
0132Executive Search Consultants’ Biases Against Women (or Men?)Tuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
Executive Search Consultants’ Biases Against Women (or Men?)
Women remain under-represented in leadership positions. Headhunters act as gatekeepers in hiring processes possibly having an impact on female disadvantage. Authors tested whether headhunters show an antiwoman bias. Neither an explicit nor an implicit measure revealed such a bias, though an implicit own-gender bias was found. This is worrying as the majority of headhunters are men.
Presenters
Rudolf Siegel
Universität des Saarlandes
Cornelius J. König
Universität des Saarlandes
Yannick Zobel
Universität des Saarlandes
Markus Langer
Universität des Saarlandes
0135How Should Employers Differentiate Their Employment Offers?Tuesday Jun 161:00 AM50 MinutesVirtual ClassroomPoster
How Should Employers Differentiate Their Employment Offers?
To be the employer of choice, employers should differentiate their employment offers from those of competitors. Results show that offering the same yet better affected job seekers’ preference more positively than offering something unique in lowly complex judgment/decision-making situations and in highly complex judgment/decision-making situations if job seekers had more work experience. Advanced
Presenters
Lien M. Wille
Ghent University
Eva Derous
Ghent University
Bert Weijters
Ghent University