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A Fresh Look at Resilience: Outcomes, Inputs, and Processes

Linda L. Hoopes, Ph.D. President, Resilience Alliance

Matthew Haynes 0 1389 Article rating: 5.0

Learn more about the author at  http://resiliencealliance.com/linda-hoopes-phd/

I am writing this article early in the US response to the coronavirus epidemic. Please consider how the ideas below apply to individuals, groups, organizations, and nations as we find our way through this crisis, and also about how we can build more resilience into our systems in the future.

Although I am passionate about helping people thrive in turbulence, I must confess that I sometimes get tired of hearing the word “resilience.” Just about every conversation that takes place about change, stress, crisis, or well-being includes the term, but its definitions vary widely. Here are a few examples:

Managing Stress During COVID-19: The Dark Side of Personality

Gordon Curphy, PhD and Dianne Nilsen, PhD Curphy Leadership Solutions

Matthew Haynes 0 2815 Article rating: 4.7

Crises tend to bring out both the best and the worst in people. On one hand, the COVID-19 pandemic has people picking up groceries for their elderly neighbors, sewing masks, and sending hand sanitizers to those in need. At the same time, others are hoarding toilet paper, spreading conspiracy theories on social media, and failing to follow health directives from authorities.

Hardly anyone is going through their normal routines of getting ready for work, commuting to the office, spending the day with colleagues, returning home, and enjoying evenings with family and friends. People are struggling with how to effectively work from home while simultaneously being their children’s primary education and day care provider. Health care workers and others deemed essential are working longer hours than ever before, whereas those in the restaurant, bar, entertainment, fitness, hospitality, airline, and cruise industries sit idle.  Consultants and gig economy workers have seen most sources of income dry up, and those still employed have no idea whether their companies will be in business next year. The disruptions to our daily routine, uncertainty about finances, concerns about becoming infected or losing loved ones, and isolation are creating unprecedented levels of stress. No one is going to be at their best under these circumstances; the COVID-19 pandemic has created a perfect storm for our dark sides to emerge.

Top 10 Workplace Trends for 2020

New Decade Brings New Trends Along With Familiar Topics in SIOP’s 7th Annual Top 10 Workplace Trends

Matthew Haynes 0 6010 Article rating: 4.7

The Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP) is pleased to announce its seventh annual Top 10 Workplace Trends list. Based on member surveys, these are the issues that will have the most impact on the workplace in 2020. 

For the first time, there is a tie between two of the topics; at #9 on the list – “Virtual working spaces” and ”Meaning and purposeful work.” Newly trending topics include workforce health and well-being, and meaning and purposeful work. The entries in SIOP’s Top 10 list are broad, complex issues posing difficult challenges to the business world and modern society, so it’s no surprise that many other trends have appeared on previous lists. 

Industrial-organizational psychologists study workplace issues of critical relevance to business, including talent management, coaching, assessment, selection, training, organizational development, performance, and work–life balance. I-O psychologists can help all kinds of organizations, including for-profit, nonprofit and government, grappling with these issues find solutions that are right for their organizations and their staff.

To create this list, SIOP asked its members for their predictions based on their expertise as well as interactions with clients and colleagues. After the responses were compiled, members selected the top 10 issues organizations are likely to face in 2020. Nearly 1,000 members responded, and here’s what they had to say:

Learning Agility Clearly Linked to Performance and Learning

By Robin Gerrow

Matthew Haynes 0 1064 Article rating: 5.0

In today’s climate, organizations need leaders who can turn on a dime. Identifying, and investing in, those potential leaders early in career or tenure to the organization is important.

Although learning agility--the ability to learn from experiences and then apply that knowledge to new conditions and environments--is starting to be seen as an important construct trait when it comes to identifying organizational leadership, there hasn’t been a lot of work done on how that trait impacts learning and performance over time. Erin Laxson, PhD, a managing consultant with Hogan Assessments, found that curious. After all, organizations were starting to invest in employees who demonstrated behaviors associated with learning agility, but how did that predict future career success for individuals, and in turn how those individuals contributed to their organizations?

In her presentation, “The Impact of Learning Agility on Career Success,” at the 2019 SIOP Annual Conference she took an in-depth look at the links between learning agility and learning and performance—two indicators of career success. 

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