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Calling Potential Contributors to “The Bridge: Connecting Science and Practice”

Kimberly Adams, Independent Consultant and Stephanie Zajac, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Matthew Haynes 0 1285 Article rating: No rating

As Talya Bauer stated in her January 2019 President’s Message, the integration of science and practice will be a key focus during her leadership. As a first step, the Science–Practice Opportunities for Translation (SPOT) Task Force was established, and newly appointed team members already have been busy working on new strategies—like the creation of the Scientist–Practitioner Presidential Recognition Award—and strengthening existing ones.

The Pros and Cons of Interdisciplinarity as a Junior Academic: How to Decide When it’s Worth it

Dorothy R. Carter & Hayley M. Trainer, The University of Georgia

Matthew Haynes 0 1456 Article rating: 5.0

A little over 2 weeks ago, I (Dorothy) traveled for many hours in order to attend a fascinating small group meeting in Berlin, Germany where I presented research that my graduate student and coauthor of this column, Hayley Trainer, and I are working on together related to leadership networks and gender. The conference was organized and hosted by a multidisciplinary group of researchers, including Professor of Evolutionary Psychology, Work and Organizational Psychology Mark van Vugt and scholars from fields like Biology, Zoology, and Anthropology, who are interested in laying a foundation for research on “female leadership in human and other mammalian societies.” I thoroughly enjoyed meeting, talking with, and learning from these amazing researchers, and I left feeling incredibly inspired and full of fresh ideas. Then, last week, we (Dorothy & Hayley) traveled a much shorter distance to attend another fascinating conference in Pine Mountain, Georgia hosted by the Georgia Clinical and Translational Science Alliance (CTSA). The Georgia CTSA, which is funded by the National Institutes of Health, aims to accelerate clinical and translational research, education, and community engagement in Georgia and beyond and, in particular, speed the translation of observations in the laboratory, clinic, and community into interventions that improve public health. Hayley and I attended this conference in our capacity as part of the “evaluation and continuous improvement” team that helps ensure the Georgia CTSA system is meeting its objectives and also because we are collecting and analyzing data related to “scientific teamwork” using CTSA scientists as our sample. Hayley and I left this conference with a clearer picture of how to frame our paper and also how to contribute to the bigger picture goals of the project.

The Pros and Cons of Interdisciplinarity as a Junior Academic: How to Decide When it’s Worth it

Dorothy R. Carter & Hayley M. Trainer, The University of Georgia

Matthew Haynes 0 1023 Article rating: No rating

A little over 2 weeks ago, I (Dorothy) traveled for many hours in order to attend a fascinating small group meeting in Berlin, Germany where I presented research that my graduate student and coauthor of this column, Hayley Trainer, and I are working on together related to leadership networks and gender. The conference was organized and hosted by a multidisciplinary group of researchers, including Professor of Evolutionary Psychology, Work and Organizational Psychology Mark van Vugt and scholars from fields like Biology, Zoology, and Anthropology, who are interested in laying a foundation for research on “female leadership in human and other mammalian societies.” I thoroughly enjoyed meeting, talking with, and learning from these amazing researchers, and I left feeling incredibly inspired and full of fresh ideas. Then, last week, we (Dorothy & Hayley) traveled a much shorter distance to attend another fascinating conference in Pine Mountain, Georgia hosted by the Georgia Clinical and Translational Science Alliance (CTSA). The Georgia CTSA, which is funded by the National Institutes of Health, aims to accelerate clinical and translational research, education, and community engagement in Georgia and beyond and, in particular, speed the translation of observations in the laboratory, clinic, and community into interventions that improve public health. Hayley and I attended this conference in our capacity as part of the “evaluation and continuous improvement” team that helps ensure the Georgia CTSA system is meeting its objectives and also because we are collecting and analyzing data related to “scientific teamwork” using CTSA scientists as our sample. Hayley and I left this conference with a clearer picture of how to frame our paper and also how to contribute to the bigger picture goals of the project.

On the Legal Front: What to Expect from OFCCP and EEOC in 2019

Joanna Colosimo & Rosemary Cox, DCI Consulting Group, Inc

Matthew Haynes 0 1686 Article rating: No rating

Within the Department of Labor’s (DOL) Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), there have been important policy, enforcement, and leadership changes.  This article provides insight into how new leadership within EEOC and OFCCP has impacted the design, implementation, and monitoring of EEO enforcement.  Specifically, we will review EEOC leadership changes and policy updates as well as OFCCP leadership changes and directives, with a focus on pay equity enforcement, outreach, and a forecast for 2019.

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