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Saturday PM

 

119. Roundtable: Saturday, 12:0012:50 Conference D/E

I-O Psychologists Strategic Role in 21st-Century Corporations

Business leaders across the world are searching for a vision of the future. Supported by extensive research into life in 21st century corporations, this session will stimulate discussion of factors that will help participants plan the role for I-O psychologists in the workplace of the 21st century.

John R. Leonard, Hewitt Associates LLC, Co-Host

Jared D. Lock, Hogan Assessment Systems, Co-Host

Submitted by John R. Leonard, john.leonard@hewitt.com

 

120. Symposium: Saturday, 12:001:20 Conference F

Social and Emotional Influences on Job Satisfaction:  Complementary Puzzle Pieces

This symposium integrates basic research on the social and emotional aspects of job satisfaction. Utilizing classic (social information processing and social power) and emergent (affective events theory and emotional labor) paradigms, we present four studies demonstrating the importance of these factors in predicting job satisfaction.

Catherine S. Daus, Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville, Chair

Stephen Axelrad, St. Louis University, Richard D. Harvey, St. Louis University, Investigating the Informational Influence of Coworkers on the Formation of Job Satisfaction among New Workers

Richard L. Gossett, Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville, The Impact of Supervisor Power on Employee Job Satisfaction as Mediated by Mood

Catherine S. Daus, Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville, Dissatisfaction as a Result of Emotional Labor

Andrew Miner, University of Minnesota, Theresa M. Glomb, University of Minnesota, Charles L. Hulin, University of Illinois, Using Experience-Sampled Data to Investigate Relations Among Aggregated Work Mood, Job Satisfaction, and Behaviors

Howard M. Weiss, Purdue University, Discussant

Submitted by Catherine S. Daus, cdaus@siue.edu

 

121. Symposium: Saturday, 12:001:20 Conference G

Defining, Measuring, and Creating a Positive Climate for Diversity

Despite predictions that increased diversity will force organizations to alter their climate to accommodate and take advantage of diverse employees, very little is known about what constitutes an affirming climate for diversity. This symposium will address this issue by empirically examining various definitions, models, and measurement tools for diversity climate.

Donna Chrobot-Mason, University of ColoradoDenver, Chair

Quinetta M. Roberson, Cornell University, D. Brent Smith, Rice University, Disentangling Diversity and Inclusion

Ellen E. Kossek, Michigan State University, Karen S. Markel, Michigan State, Patrick McHugh, George Washington University, Trickling Organizational Demographic Change in Sex and Race Composition: Shaping Ambiguous Group Social Climates for Diversity

Donna Chrobot-Mason, University of ColoradoDenver, Nicholas Aramovich, University of ColoradoDenver, Assessing the Multicultural Organization: A Comparison of Whites and Non-Whites

Keith James, Colorado State University, Assessing Value Differences among Workers from Divergent Cultural Backgrounds: Implications for Climate and Worker Health

Belle Rose Ragins, University of WisconsinMilwaukee, Discussant

Jeanette N. Cleveland, Penn State University, Discussant

Submitted by Donna Chrobot-Mason, dchrobot@carbon.cudenver.edu

 

122. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 12:001:20 York

Talent Management Strategies for Leadership Growth and Continuity

Presenters will discuss how their talent-planning systems have evolved to address changing business demands and a growing emphasis on human capital. They will describe their talent-management practices and how they are integrated with other HR and business-planning processes and broader leadership development efforts.

Thomas W. Mason, Personnel Decisions International, Chair

Lorrina J. Eastman, Bank of America, Adam Ortiz, Bank of America, Michael L. Trusty, Bank of America, Leveraging Talent Management to Support a Changing Business Strategy and Leadership Demands

Bernard G. Bedon, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Claudia Pezzina, Hofstra University, Talent Management as Competitive Advantage

James H. Brooks, Cisco Systems, Inc., Evolving Talent Management Strategies in a Turbulent Economy

Submitted by Michael L. Trusty, mike.trusty@BankofAmerica.com

 

123. Special Event: Saturday, 12:0012:50 Dominion North

Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award:  Dilemmas in I-O Psychology: A Search for Balance

Using research on feedback, performance appraisal accuracy, and motivation in teams, two perspectives are compared and evaluated. One is that of accepting inherent dilemmas, then mapping the tensions in the space; the other is searching for specific solutions to problems.

Terence R. Mitchell, University of Washington, Chair

Daniel R. Ilgen, Michigan State University, Presenter

 

124. Symposium: Saturday, 12:0012:50 Dominion South

From Personality to Profits

The papers in this symposium collectively test and find support for a framework beginning with unit leader personality and ending with unit sales with the following intermediate linkages: unit leader behavior, unit service climate and organizational citizenship behavior, and then customer satisfaction and unit sales.

Benjamin Schneider, University of Maryland, Chair

Jessica Lynne Saltz, University of Maryland, Benjamin Schneider, University of Maryland, Mark Ehrhart, San Diego State University, David Mayer, University of Maryland, Leader Personality and Leader Behavior: Necessary Ingredients for Service

Mark Ehrhart, San Diego State University, Servant-Leadership and Justice Climate: Antecedents of Unit-Level Organizational Citizenship Behavior

Kathryn Niles-Jolly, U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Organizational Citizenship Behavior and Service Quality: A Group Level Analysis

David Mayer, University of Maryland, Benjamin Schneider, University of Maryland, Jessica Lynne Saltz, University of Maryland, Mark Ehrhart, San Diego State University, Amy Nicole Salvaggio, Service and Sales: The Role of Customer Satisfaction

David E. Bowen, Discussant

Submitted by Benjamin Schneider, ben@psyc.umd.edu

 

125. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 12:001:20 Wentworth

Current State of Total Quality Management: Neither Fad nor Panacea

Comprised of both advocates and critics of TQM, this panel discussion is designed to separate criticisms of TQM as another management fad from the principles of TQM that are theoretically and empirically well-grounded in academic literature. Panelists will share their own experiences and insights regarding the current state and future direction of TQM.

John D. Watt, University of Central Arkansas, Co-Chair

Deidra J. Schleicher, University of Tulsa, Co-Chair

Marshall Sashkin, George Washington University, Panelist

Elizabeth L. Shoenfelt, Western Kentucky University, Panelist

Douglas A. Horne, Institute for Quality Advancement, Panelist

Robert K. Closson, Strategic Marketing Decisions, Panelist

Cynthia J. DeZouche, Navy Environmental Health Center, Panelist

Submitted by John D. Watt, JohnWatt@mail.uca.edu

 

126. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 12:001:20 Kenora

Exporting American I-O Psychology: Lessons From Abroad

Much of the research and practice of I-O psychology is developed in the United States and exported to other countries. This panel brings together five I-O psychologists who were trained in the United States and who have worked abroad. They discuss various challenges and strategies for being successful abroad.

Dirk D. Steiner, Universite de NiceSophia Antipolis, Co-Chair

Beverly A. Dugan, HumRRO, Co-Chair

Beverly A. Dugan, HumRRO, Panelist

Joy Fisher Hazucha, Personnel Decisions International, Panelist

C. Harry Hui, University of Hong Kong, Panelist

Scott E. McIntyre, Instituto Superior da Maia, Panelist

Dirk D. Steiner, Universite de NiceSophia Antipolis, Panelist

Submitted by Dirk D. Steiner, steiner@unice.fr

 

127. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 12:0012:50 Huron

Integrating Career Development, Performance Management, and Compensation: Lessons Learned

Presenters will discuss examples of using competencies to integrate HR processes with business strategy for three organizations. Business needs drove integrated career path planning, performance management, compensation, and other HR processes. Lessons learned will be discussed, and audience members are encouraged to participate.

Catherine Q. Mergen, Buck Consultants, Chair

John E. Furcon, Buck Consultants, Kathryn Kavanagh, Sapient Corporation, Development and Implementation of a Global Career Model

Edwin J. Trouba, Buck Consultants, Applying Competencies to Create a Customer-Focused IT Organization

Catherine Q. Mergen, Buck Consultants, Nick Campagna, BPO Solutions Centre, PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLC, Building and Delivering HR for a Newly Outsourced Business

Submitted by Catherine Q. Mergen, catherine.q.mergen@unifi.com

 

128. Symposium: Saturday, 12:001:20 Kent

Old Dogs, New Tricks:  Traditional Methodologies Applied to Public Policy

Industrial-organizational psychologys methods have increasingly been applied to problems that carry far-reaching implications for revisions of public policy. The symposium presents studies that exemplify this trend in several areas: medical college selection, nursing home evaluation, strategic job analysis at the level of the U.S. economy, and class-action litigation support.

Sigrid B. Gustafson, American Institutes for Research, Chair

Kimberly A. Adams, American Institutes for Research, Cynthia A. Searcy, American Institutes for Research, Lorin M. Mueller, American Institutes for Research, Patricia Etienne, American Association of Medical Colleges, Modeling the Medical Training Process through Critical Incidents

Laura A. Steighner, American Institutes for Research, Nancy Matheson, American Institutes for Research, Joyce D. Mattson, American Institutes for Research, Beverly Cullen, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Karen Schoeneman, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Applying BARS Techniques to Rating Nursing-Home Deficiencies

Lorin M. Mueller, American Institutes for Research, Andrew M. Rose, American Institutes for Research, Sigrid B. Gustafson, American Institutes for Research, Using Job-Analytic Techniques To Assess Occupational Change

Margaret E. Giffin, Giffin Consulting Services, Wayne F. Cascio, University of Colorado, Mary Anne Lahey, American Institutes for Research, Retrospective Job Analyses of Computer Specialists Over 14 Years

Juan I. Sanchez, Florida International University, Discussant

Submitted by Sigrid B. Gustafson, sgustafson@air.org

 

129. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 12:001:20 Civic Ballroom

Cross-Cultural Implications for Instructional Design, Delivery, and Evaluation

An instructional program that is developed for one culture may not be suitable for another. Panelists will consider the practical implications of cultural differences for the instructional process. Specifically, the panel will discuss the implications of cultural differences for designing, delivering, and evaluating instructional programs.

Paula M. Caligiuri, Rutgers University, Chair

Ibraiz Tarique, Rutgers University, Panelist

Herman Aguinis, University of ColoradoDenver, Panelist

Kurt Kraiger, University of ColoradoDenver, Panelist

Submitted by Paula M. Caligiuri, caligiur@rci.rutgers.edu

 

130. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 12:301:50 Grand Centre

Should We Use the Unproctored Internet to Collect Applicant Data?

While most psychologists accept the Internet as a supervised testing medium, some practitioners have embraced the public access Internet to gather information for testing and selection purposes. This session will address concerns and solutions associated with validity, test security, test integrity and cheating, faking and impression management, and candidate perceptions.

David J. Scarborough, Unicru, Inc., Chair

Jurgen Bank, SHL USA Inc., Panelist

David G. Bigby, Bigby, Havis & Associates, Panelist

Charles A. Handler, rocket-hire.com, Panelist

Stephanie R. Klein, ePredix, Inc., Panelist

Nathan J. Mondragon, Development Dimensions International, Panelist

Submitted by David E. Ostberg, Dostberg@unicru.com

 

131. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 12:301:20 Grand East

Its New and Its Used: Applications of O*NET

O*NETs computerized occupational information database has completed initial data-collection efforts and can now go operational in various ways. The first two presentations categorize occupations and link measures to O*NET data for job analysis and validity generalization purposes; the last two deal with O*NETs benefits and applications for career exploration.

Frederick L. Oswald, Michigan State University, Chair

Jeff W. Johnson, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Gary W. Carter, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, David W. Dorsey, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Development of an Occupational Strength Requirement Measure from O*NET Descriptors

Erika DEgidio, Jeanneret & Associates, Inc., Field Applications of O*NET

Patrick D. Converse, Michigan State University, Frederick L. Oswald, Michigan State University, Michael A. Gillespie, Michigan State University, Kevin A. Field, The Ball Foundation, Elizabeth B. Bizot, The Ball Foundation, Beyond Gut Instinct: Exploring Careers Using Aptitudes and O*NET

Sarah Yates Glass, Bigby Havis & Associates, Carol Jenkins, Bigby Havis & Associates, Revolutionizing Career Exploration via O*NET and the Internet

Rodney A. McCloy, HumRRO, Discussant

Submitted by Frederick L. Oswald, foswald@msu.edu

 

132. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 12:301:50 Essex

I-O Psychologys Role in Response to Workplace Trauma

This presentation focuses on contributions I-O psychology can make to address work trauma experienced in the field of law enforcement. Participants represent a broad spectrum of expertise in the field of law enforcement work/family issues and occupational stress. National surveys as well as practical guidelines for organizational assistance are presented.

Robert P. Delprino, SUNY-Buffalo State College, Chair

Robert P. Delprino, SUNY-Buffalo State College, I-O Psychologys Contribution to Addressing Work Place Trauma

Amy Mazzocco, U.S. Department of Justice, Corrections and Law Enforcement Family Support Program: A National Program to Reduce Occupational Stress

Jaan Schaer, Toronto Police Service, EFAP, Cathy Szabo, Toronto Police Service, Working as an Internal Change Agent in Law Enforcement Organizations to Promote a Healthy Organization

Bonita Frazer, Lake Shore Behavioral Health, Inc., Assisting Organizations in Restoring a Productive Workplace After a Traumatic Event

Mark C. Healy, 3-D Group, Strategies for Gaining Access into Law Enforcement Organizations as an External Consultant

Submitted by Robert P. Delprino, delprirp@buffalostate.edu

 

133. Symposium: Saturday, 12:302:20 Windsor

Selection for Teams: A Tale of Five Approaches

Although work is commonly organized around teams, there is relatively little empirical research on how to select individuals in team-based settings. This symposium presents research on how to select individuals for these settings. The presenters discuss evidence on situational judgment tests, personality tests, biodata tests, structured interviews, and ability tests.

Frederick P. Morgeson, Michigan State University, Chair

Michael J. Stevens, University of Missouri-St Louis, Whats Past is Prologue: Exploring a Biodata Approach to Team Selection

Frederick P. Morgeson, Michigan State University, Matthew H. Reider, Purdue University, Michael A. Campion, Purdue University, Selecting Individuals in Team Settings: Comparing a Structured Interview, Personality Test, and Teamwork Ability Test

Greg L. Stewart, Brigham Young University, Murray R. Barrick, University of Iowa, Examining TraitGoal Interactions and Performance in a Team Setting

Troy V. Mumford, Purdue University, Team-Role Knowledge and its Relationship with Team-Role Performance

John D. Arnold, Aon Consulting, Discussant

Richard J. Klimoski, George Mason University, Discussant

Submitted by Frederick P. Morgeson, morgeson@msu.edu

 

134. Symposium: Saturday, 12:301:50 Elgin

New Directions in Research on Motivational Traits

This symposium is a collection of studies that examine approaches to assessing the dispositional basis of work motivation. Recent theory and empirical work in the areas of goal orientation, motivational traits, and action-state orientation are presented, with an emphasis on understanding the unique contributions of each.

James M. Diefendorff, Louisiana State University, Chair

Aaron M. Schmidt, Michigan State University, J. Kevin Ford, Michigan State University, The Role of Goal Orientations on Metacognitive Activity and Learning Outcomes

Ruth Kanfer, Georgia Institute of Technology, Phillip L. Ackerman, Georgia Institute of Technology, Cognitive and Non-Ability Influences on Volition During Skill Training

Robert R. Hirschfeld, University of Georgia, Lucinda Lawson, Lehigh University, Differential Predictive Validity of General Propensities Encompassing Approach Motivation

James M. Diefendorff, Louisiana State University, Robin H. Gosserand, Louisiana State University, Rosalie J. Hall, University of Akron, Chu-Hsiang Chang, University of Akron, Distinguishing Action-State Orientation from Other Motivational and Self-Regulatory Traits

Eric D. Heggestad, Colorado State University, Discussant

Submitted by James M. Diefendorff, jdiefen@lsu.edu

 

135. Roundtable: Saturday, 12:301:50 Simcoe/Dufferin

Back to Square One: Lessons that Graduate School Left Out

The early career of a practitioner is filled with lessons that are not taught during graduate training. This roundtable will provide the opportunity for participants to converse about the issues facing new professionals. Audience members are encouraged to use this opportunity to network and discuss their own concerns and experiences.

Greg A. Barnett, Hogan Assessment Systems, Co-Host

Lisa Mills, U.S. Army Research Institute, Co-Host

Lee Welton Croll, RHR International, Co-Host

Michael Najar, United Airlines, Co-Host

Ryan A. Ross, Hogan Assessment Systems, Co-Host

Submitted by Greg A. Barnett, drpanker@home.com

 

136. Special Event: Saturday, 1:002:50 Conference B/C

Frontiers Series Invited Symposium:  The Dark Side of Organizational Behavior

An increasing array of employee behaviors has attracted attention among organizational scholars. While some of these are functional in nature, others relate to negative consequences. Collectively, this emerging set of constructs might be called the dark side of organizational behavior. Ricky Griffin and Anne OLeary-Kelly have contracted to develop a book as part of the SIOP Frontiers Series, addressing various dark side variables and constructs. The symposium will include representative presentations by four author teams whose work will appear in the book.

Ricky W. Griffin, Texas A&M University, Co-Chair

Anne M. OLeary-Kelly, University of Arkansas, Co-Chair

Robert D. Pritchard, Texas A&M University, Co-Chair

Robert D. Pritchard, Texas A&M University, Discussion of the Frontiers Series and the Emergence of the Dark Side Book

Ricky W. Griffin, Texas A&M University, Introduction and Overview of The Dark Side of Organizational Behavior

Joel H. Neuman, SUNYNew Paltz, The Interactive Effects of Injustice, Stress, and Workplace Aggression

K. Michele Kacmar, Florida State University, Extreme Careerism: The Dark Side of Impression Management

Virginia K. Bratton, Florida State University, Elizabeth Deitch, Tulane University, Out of the Closet and Out of a Job? The Nature, Import and Causes of Sexual Orientation Discrimination in the Workplace

Rebecca Butz, Tulane University, Arthur P. Brief, Tulane University, Robert L. Dipboye, Rice University, Illegal and Unfair Discrimination in Organizations

Anne M. OLeary-Kelly, University of Arkansas, Discussant

 

137. Symposium: Saturday, 1:002:20 Conference D/E

Goal-Perception Discrepancy Production:  Current Practical and Theoretical Issues

Goal-perception discrepancy production is the quintessential dynamic goal-striving process. In this symposium, four papers are presented that explore current theoretical and practical issues in discrepancy production via change in goal levels. In particular, the antecedents to discrepancy production and the goal-striving processes that may account for discrepancy production are explored.

Jeffrey B. Vancouver, The Ohio University, Chair

Charles A. Scherbaum, The Ohio University, Jeffrey B. Vancouver, The Ohio University, Testing a Computational Goal-Discrepancy Reducing Model of Discrepancy Production

John J. Donovan, Virginia Tech, Antecedents of Discrepancy Production in an Achievement Setting

David J. Radosevich, The Ohio State University, Vandana Vaidyanathan, The Ohio State University, Motivational Mechanisms Involved in Discrepancy Production Over Time

Kyle E. Brink, University of Georgia, Self-Efficacy and Goal Change in the Absence of External Feedback

Kevin J. Williams, University at AlbanySUNY, Discussant

Submitted by Jeffrey B. Vancouver, vancouve@ohio.edu

 

138. Special Event: Saturday, 1:002:50 Dominion North

The Wake of Disaster: Impact on the Nations Workplace

The indelible impact of September 11 has rippled through the U.S. economyeconomic and other issues continue to be felt. Results will be presented from a national study conducted in October 2001. Sent to 10,000 workers, the survey addressed changes in the workplace: how much, in what way, how permanent.

Scott M. Brooks, Gantz Wiley Research, Chair

Jack W. Wiley, Gantz Wiley Research, Presenter

Emily L. Hause, Augsburg College, Presenter

 

139. Symposium: Saturday, 1:002:50 Dominion South

Stereotype Threat in Testing Contexts: A Critical Examination

Stereotype threat has been proposed as an explanation for racial subgroup differences on cognitive ability tests. The presentations in this symposium take a critical look at stereotype threat research, with a particular emphasis on how it applies to employment contexts. These papers identify several difficulties with applying stereotype threat research.

Robert E. Ployhart, George Mason University, Chair

Lynn A. McFarland, George Mason University, Dalit Lev-Arey Margalit, George Mason University, Jonathan C. Ziegert, University of Maryland, Stereotype Threat: Generalizability to a Motivational Context

Hannah-Hanh Dung Nguyen, Michigan State University, Alisha ONeal, Michigan State University, Ann Marie Ryan, Michigan State University, Stereotype Threat Effects on Cognitive Ability Performance in Applicant Settings

David Mayer, University of Maryland, Paul J. Hanges, University of Maryland, What Underlies Stereotype Threat? An Examination of Potential Mediators

Jonathan C Ziegert, University of Maryland, Robert E. Ployhart, George Mason University, Lynn A. McFarland, George Mason University, Perceived Stereotype Threat: Development of a Self-Report Scale

Michael J. Cullen, University of Minnesota, Chaitra M. Hardison, University of Minnesota, Zach Lippe, University of Minnesota, Depictions of Stereotype Threat in the Popular and Scientific Media

Paul R. Sackett, University of Minnesota, Discussant

Submitted by Robert E. Ployhart, rployhar@gmu.edu

 

140. Symposium: Saturday, 1:002:20 Huron

Do Common Recruitment Strategies Effectively Increase Organizational Workforce Diversity

Companies struggle to enhance their workforce diversity. Recruitment strategies are critical in this process. Current research illuminates the effectiveness of common strategies intended to attract a diverse applicant pool. We focus specifically on job advertisements and brochures as recruitment tools and evaluate applicant responses based on gender and race.

Lesley A. Perkins, Caliber Associates, Co-Chair

Joan M. Ratz, Minnesota State UniversityMankato, Co-Chair

Lesley A. Perkins, Caliber Associates, Kecia M. Thomas, University of Georgia, The Spillover Effects of Demography on Organizational Efforts to Recruit

Debra J. Drenth, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Walter C. Borman, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Diversity and Recruitment: A Policy-Capturing Approach

Joan M. Ratz, Minnesota State UniversityMankato, Sara K. Farrell, Minnesota State UniversityMankato, Andy Dybvig, Minnesota State UniversityMankato, Perceived Fairness of and Attraction to an Organization Based on Diversity Policy and Job Gender Stereotype

Talya N. Bauer, Portland State University, Discussant

Submitted by Joan M. Ratz, jratz@lamar.colostate.edu

 

141. Poster Session: Saturday, 1:002:20 Sheraton Hall

Motivation and Performance Management

 

141-1 The Frame-of-Reference Training Protocol: All Feedback is Not Created Equal

Previous frame-of-reference training (FOR) research has not examined the training protocol used in FOR training. Focusing upon the feedback component of the protocol, we examined the implications of performance theory complexity for determining the optimal protocol. We found that complexity matters when designing an optimal training protocol.

Lorne M. Sulsky, University of Calgary

Krista L. Uggerslev, University of Calgary

David V. Day, Pennsylvania State University

Janine Keown, University of Calgary

Submitted by Krista L. Uggerslev, kuggersl@ucalgary.ca 

141-2 Assessing Three Measures of Free-Set Goal Difficulty

Free-set goals (FSGs) are defined by goal setters themselves; therefore, goal difficulty and content freely vary. We assessed the validity of coding FSG difficulty against findings generated in previous goal studies. Comparing three ways to operationalize FSG difficulty, external assessments of difficulty predicted performance better than the goal-setters self-assessed goal difficulty.

Thomas D. Kane, Southwest Missouri State University

Janet E. Loughran, Southwest Missouri State University

Carol F. Shoptaugh, Southwest Missouri State University

Audra Nelson, South Dakota Bureau of Personnel

Rebecca J. Reichard, Florida International University

Submitted by Thomas D. Kane, tdk464F@smsu.edu 

141-3 Effects of Compelling Personal Vision on Hierarchical Goal Structures

We examined extreme distal goals of personal goal hierarchies (i.e., personal vision). Students who described their personal visions set higher quality goals than controls. Mixed results were found for students who portrayed optimistic personal visions rather than their likely future. Results support logically connected, yet malleable, goal hierarchies.

Aline Delgado Masuda, Southwest Missouri State University

Katherine Ford Minor, Southwest Missouri State University

Carol F. Shoptaugh, Southwest Missouri State University

Thomas D. Kane, Southwest Missouri State University

Submitted by Carol F. Shoptaugh, cfs280f@smsu.edu 

141-4 Learning Goal Orientation, Self-Efficacy, and Goal Level:  A Multispecificity Perspective

Relationships between learning goal orientation and self-efficacy were examined in relation to self-set goals at two specificity levels. The proximal operationalizations of these constructs mediated the effects of distal operationalizations and interacted to affect goals. The nature of the mediation between these two constructs differed for congruent and incongruent operationalizations.

Stephen B. Jeong, The Ohio State University

Howard J. Klein, The Ohio State University

Submitted by Stephen B. Jeong, Jeong.36@osu.edu 

141-5 Gender Stereotypes and Performance Evaluation: The Impact of Individual-Difference Measures

This study examined whether individual difference measures moderate the relationship between gender-stereotypes (traditional/nontraditional) and the accuracy of performance evaluations of women. Results indicated that the relationship between stereotype and rating accuracy was strongest for individuals who were high in need for closure and low self-monitors.

Cara C. Bauer, Wayne State University

Lindsey M. Young, Wayne State University

Boris B. Baltes, Wayne State University

Submitted by Cara C. Bauer, carab20@aol.com 

141-6 Multisource Feedback Practices That Enhance Organizational Outcomes

A survey was administered to senior human resource executives in 42 global organizations to assess the extent to which various multisource feedback (MSF) practices were employed and the outcomes of those practices. Specific practices were found to be significantly related to the benefits derived from MSF.

Evelyn E. Rogers, E. Rogers Associates, Inc.

Michael T. Barriere, Hofstra University

Ira T. Kaplan, Hofstra University

William Metlay, Hofstra University

Submitted by Michael T. Barriere, psymtb@hofstra.edu 

141-7 How Equity Sensitivity Affects Attitudes and Behaviors

The purpose of this study was to determine how equity sensitivity influences attitudes and behaviors. Equity sensitivity did not affect perceptions of distributive justice. It also did not have reliable interactive effects with distributive justice to explain reactions. Additive effects were found. Potential explanations for the results are discussed.

William C. Roedder, The University of Tennessee

Michael C. Rush, The University of Tennessee

Robert T. Ladd, The University of Tennessee

Dave Schumann, The University of Tennessee

David J. Woehr, The University of Tennessee

Submitted by William C. Roedder, chadroedder@hotmail.com 

141-8 Practitioners Rate Performance Appraisal Uses and Barriers

In an effort to understand why widespread dissatisfaction exists about the performance appraisal process, practitioners perceptions were solicited. Seventy-four (74) managers indicated that employee feedback and development was the most effective use of performance appraisal, while a lack of training on how to give performance feedback was the most significant barrier.

Patricia C. Browne, George Mason University

Stephanie C. Payne, Texas A&M University

Submitted by Stephanie C. Payne, scp@psyc.tamu.edu 

141-9 SelfOther Agreement on a 360-Degree Leadership

The current study investigates the relationship between Air Force promotion rate and self-supervisor (n = 825), self-peer (n = 285), and self-subordinate (n = 256) agreement on a leadership scale. Results indicate that self-subordinate agreement a better predictor of promotion rate than self-superior or self-peer agreement. Analyses were completed using Polynomial Regressions Equations (Edwards, 1993; 1994).

Stefanie K. Halverson, Rice University

Scott Tonidandel, Rice University

Cassie B. Barlow, U.S. Air Force

Robert L. Dipboye, Rice University

Submitted by Stefanie K. Halverson, skh@rice.edu 

141-10 Differences in Self- and Superior-Ratings of Performance:  Personality Provides Clues

Self-superior differences in performance ratings were studied in relation to ratees personality trait scores using 204 managers in a financial services organization. It was found that inflation of self-ratings of performance relative to superior ratings was associated with high achievement, high desirability, low anxiety, and high social confidence (self-esteem).

Richard D. Goffin, University of Western Ontario

David W. Anderson, Bank of Nova Scotia

Submitted by Richard D. Goffin, goffin@uwo.ca 

141-11 Position Management:  A Broader Definition of Performance Appraisal System Effectiveness

Performance appraisal systems are generally conceptualized as methods for managing individual behavior through administrative and developmental actions. In this paper we extend this view by examining PA as a method for position (versus incumbent) management. Evidence from a survey of incumbents and managers supports this view. Various criteria were predicted.

Satoris S. Youngcourt, Southwest Missouri State University

Robert G. Jones, Southwest Missouri State University

Submitted by Robert G. Jones, RobertJones@smsu.edu

141-12 Does Discussing Multisource Feedback With Raters Enhance Performance Improvement?

Ratees (5,335) who discussed their multisource feedback with supervisors improved more than others (1 year later) based on supervisor ratings. Among ratees who received unfavorable feedback from direct reports or peers, those who discussed the feedback with those raters improved more than others based on direct report and peer ratings.

James W. Smither, La Salle University

Manuel London, SUNYStony Brook

Raymond Flautt, JP Morgan Chase

Yvette Vargas, JP Morgan Chase

Ivy Kucine, JP Morgan Chase

Submitted by James W. Smither, amysean@aol.com 

141-13 Personality and Leaders Reactions to and Use of Multisource Feedback

Among military leaders, agreeableness was related to multisource ratings, neuroticism was related to openness to feedback, and responsibility was related to accountability to use the feedback. Six months later, leaders high in extraversion had sought more feedback, and leaders high in responsibility had engaged in more developmental behaviors.

James W. Smither, La Salle University

Manuel London, SUNYStony Brook

Kristin Roukema Richmond, United States Military

Submitted by James W. Smither, amysean@aol.com 

141-14 Group Performance Appraisal: Increasing Rating Accuracy

This study explores the role of group discussion and consensus in determining the accuracy of performance ratings. Results suggest that even though members in groups requiring discussion significantly increased their accuracy (elevation and differential elevation) after discussion, requiring a consensus rating can result in the most accurate ratings (differential elevation).

Sylvia G. Roch, University at AlbanySUNY

Submitted by Sylvia G. Roch, roch@csc.albany.edu 

141-15 Situational Goal Orientation:  Enhancing Our Understanding of the Goal-Setting Process

The present study examined the role of situational goal orientation in the establishment of self-set goals. In addition, the possibility of self-efficacy as a mediator in this relationship was also a focus of interest. The results suggest the value of assessing the dynamic process of self-regulation with more context-specific variables.

B. Tyson Breland, Virginia Tech

John J. Donovan, Virginia Tech

Submitted by B. Tyson Breland, bbreland@vt.edu 

141-16 The Effect of Implicit Beliefs on Performance Appraisal Ratings

Two studies investigated how managers implicit theories of personality influence their responsiveness to disconfirmatory behavioral evidence. Holding an incremental theory (i.e., believing that personality changes) was positively related to managers (a) recognition of a videotaped performance improvement (n = 82), and (b) providing lower appraisal ratings after a decline in performance (n = 43).

Peter A. Heslin, University of Toronto

Submitted by Peter A. Heslin, heslin@rotman.utoronto.ca 

141-17 Factors Underlying the Selection of Raters in Multisource Assessment

This study investigates the role that organizational-based self-esteem (OBSE) and the purpose (administrative or developmental) of the multisource assessment (MSA) may play in the selection of raters. The results of the study suggest that ratees use different strategies when selecting raters.

Sandra Petosa, Societe Pierre Boucher

Stephane Brutus, Concordia University

Submitted by Stephane Brutus, brutus@vax2.concordia.ca 

141-18 Goal Orientation and Employee Satisfaction with the Performance Appraisal System

Employees with higher levels of learning-goal orientations indicated higher levels of performance-appraisal satisfaction along with higher performance-appraisal ratings. They also reported greater levels of participation of all types in the performance review. Participation partially mediated the relationship between learning-goal orientation and performance-appraisal satisfaction.

Joseph M. Ralston, Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville

Lynn K. Bartels, Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville

Cynthia R. Nordstrom, Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville

Submitted by Lynn K. Bartels, LBartel@siue.edu 

141-19 The Dynamics of State Goal Orientations

The current study examined the dynamic nature of state goal orientations over time, specifically, in response to positive or negative performance feedback. We propose and test a process model whereby individuals state goal orientations change over time as a function of performance feedback, performance evaluations, and self-efficacy.

Brad A. Chambers, Michigan State University

Richard P. DeShon, Michigan State University

Submitted by Brad A. Chambers, chamb130@msu.edu 

141-20 Feelings About Feedback:  Predicting Affective Reactions From Work Goal Orientation

This study investigated work goal orientation and positive affect following feedback with 115 employees. A learning goal orientation predicted positive affect after self-feedback, and a prove goal orientation predicted positive affect after other-feedback. An avoid goal orientation predicted positive affect after negative self-feedback. Implications of the results are discussed.

Lorayne Botwood, Macquarie University

Submitted by Lorayne Botwood, lbotwood@psy.mq.edu.au 

141-21 An Organizational Justice Explanation of Feedback Reactions in LMX Relationships

In a field setting, organizational justice was examined as a mediator between leader-member-exchange (LMX) quality and feedback reactions. Satisfaction, utility, motivation to improve, and accuracy were influenced by voice and justification being present during the appraisal discussion. Satisfaction and accuracy were also influenced by distributive, procedural, and interactional justice.

Joelle D. Elicker, University of Akron

Paul E. Levy, University of Akron

Rosalie J. Hall, University of Akron

Submitted by Paul E. Levy, plevy@uakron.edu 

141-22 Self-Ratings and Reactions: Asking for Input Isnt Always Enough

Boundary conditions associated with the positive effects of self-ratings were investigated. Results indicated that when the expectation that self-ratings would be considered was violated, reactions were less favorable than when self-ratings were not utilized at all. However, providing an explanation for the violation attenuated the negative effects of this violation.

Lisa M. Keeping, Wilfrid Laurier University

Paul E. Levy, University of Akron

Submitted by Lisa M. Keeping, lkeeping@wlu.ca 

141-23 The Feedback Environment and Work Outcome Variables

The relationship between the feedback environment (Steelman, Levy, & Snell, 2001) and work-outcome variables was examined through the mediating effects of affective commitment. Results indicate that affective commitment mediates the relationship between the feedback environment, OCBs, and absences. Conclusions and implications are discussed.

Christina Norris-Watts, University of Akron

Paul E. Levy, University of Akron

Submitted by Paul E. Levy, plevy@uakron.edu 

141-24 BARS and Those Mysterious, Missing Middle Anchors

Although behaviorally anchored rating scales (BARS) are used in many domains, little has changed since their inception in terms of developing BARS. The current study identifies why it is difficult to anchor behaviors in the middle of BARS and proposes a new scaling process to overcome this problem.

Neil M. A. Hauenstein, Virginia Tech

Reagan D. Brown, Western Kentucky University

Andrea L. Sinclair, Virginia Tech

Submitted by Neil M. A. Hauenstein, nhauen@vt.edu 

141-25 A Closer Look at Cronbachs Accuracy Components as Dependent Variables

This paper reviews and summarizes the criticisms surrounding the use of congruence indices as dependent variables with a particular focus on the use of Cronbachs (1955) accuracy components in performance-rating research. Recommendations are provided for an alternative analysis that supplements and improves upon the traditional Cronbach accuracy components.

Andrea L. Sinclair, Virginia Tech

Neil M. A. Hauenstein, Virginia Tech

Submitted by Andrea L. Sinclair, asinclair@vt.edu 

141-26 Personality and Training Proficiency:  Issues of Bandwidth-Fidelity, Validity, and Curvilinearity

This study found that narrow trait measures of conscientiousness (dependability and initiative) and emotional stability (stress-tolerance and self-control) predicted training performance more effectively than aggregated measures. Specifically, significant linear and quadratic terms were found for the dependability, but not initiative. Only the quadratic term for stress tolerance was significant.

Nicholas L. Vasilopoulos, George Washington University

Jeffrey M. Cucina, George Washington University

Rebecca Goldenberg, George Washington University

Paul D. Usala, U.S. Immigration & Naturalization Service

Submitted by Nicholas L. Vasilopoulos, nlv@gwu.edu 

141-27 NBADSA Conceptually New Rating Scale Format

Subjective rating scales suffer various biases (e.g. halo, leniency). A new continuous format, using normative distributional background to assist raters, was built and tested using several rater groups. Results show this user-friendly scale to have less leniency bias and higher accuracy and inter-rater agreement than a GRS and a BARS formats.

Eran Hollander, Virginia Tech

Robert J. Harvey, Virginia Tech

Submitted by Eran Hollander, eholland@vt.edu 

141-28 Understanding Self-Regulatory Responses to Performance Feedback

Consistent with feedback and self-regulation theories, we predicted that feedback would cue individuals attention to either task- or self-related goals, thereby affecting performance. Results indicated that, although performance was unaffected, feedback influenced attention, but only for individuals with low self-esteem. Conclusions and future directions for feedback research are discussed.

Adam Barsky, Tulane University

Ronald S. Landis, Tulane University

Submitted by Adam Barsky, abarsky@tulane.edu 

141-29 Training Nontraditional Rating Sources for Improved Interrater Agreement and Accuracy

Previous studies in 360-degree feedback have indicated that nontraditional raters tend to be low in interrater reliability, agreement, and accuracy. Accordingly, the present study examined the effectiveness of two agreement and accuracy enhancers, behaviorally oriented survey design and frame-of-reference training (FOR; Woehr, 1994). Data collected from 120 undergraduate students indicated that an abbreviated form of FOR training might be useful in customer rating situations.

Lisle S. Hites, Tulane University

Ronald S. Landis, Tulane University

Submitted by Lisle S. Hites, lhites@tulane.edu 

141-30 The Influence of Implicit Theories on Performance Attributions and Expectancies

This study examines the influence of implicit theories of ability on performance attributions and expectations across trials. Results indicated that an entity view was positively related to ability attributions following initial performance. Results also demonstrated that across trials, entity theorists based future expectations for performance on their most recent performance.

Tonya L. Dodge, University at AlbanySUNY

Kevin J. Williams, University at AlbanySUNY

Submitted by Kevin J. Williams, kevinw@csc.albany.edu 

141-31 Implicit Theories of Ability and Performance Appraisal Processes

This study extends the implicit theories of ability literature to appraisals of others performance. Implicit theory of ability was hypothesized to predict the amount of information sought to assess others performance. Although results failed to indicate the proposed effect, several explanations are offered and avenues for future research are discussed.

Greg Robinson, University at Albany,SUNY

Kevin J. Williams, University at AlbanySUNY

Submitted by Greg Robinson, gotribe@francomm.com 

141-32 Developmental Assessment Centers: Who Wants Feedback?

This study examined 189 newly hired supervisors in the transportation industry who completed a developmental assessment center. The results showed that those who performed poorly in the assessment center, particularly on interpersonal dimensions, were less likely to initiate a scheduled feedback telephone call. Implications and future research ideas are discussed.

Joseph D. Abraham, Organization Improvement Consulting

Dawn D. Burnett, University of Tulsa

John D. Morrison, Self-Employed

Submitted by Dawn D. Burnett, dawn-burnett@utulsa.edu 

141-33 Interrater Agreement in Judging Managerial Performance:  Effects of Competency Importance

Interrater agreement in multisource appraisal has been reported to be modest within- and between-rater groups. In an effort to better understand the performancejudgment process, we asked whether agreement is higher on more important managerial competencies. Results confirmed prior findings and suggested the role of competency importance is complex.

Robert P. Tett, University of Tulsa

Dawn D. Burnett, University of Tulsa

Dalibor K. Heger, University of Tulsa

Matt McCord, University of Tulsa

Submitted by Dawn D. Burnett, dawn-burnett@utulsa.edu 

141-34 Literature Review of Acceptable or Just Noticeably Different Pay Increases

We summarized empirical evidence relevant to setting appropriately sized or just noticeably different (JND) pay increases. We conducted a comprehensive literature search for JND estimates. Based on the search, we calculated an estimate of about 6.0% to 8.5% of current salary level. Several methodological concerns and research recommendations are discussed.

David A. Katkowski, HumRRO

Gina J. Medsker, HumRRO

Kenneth Pritchard, Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority

Submitted by David A. Katkowski, dkatkowski@Humrro.org 

141-35 Predicting Executive Performance with Multirater Surveys:  Who You Ask Matters

Using a 360 feedback approach, we examined the extent that ratings obtained from different rating sources (self, manager, peers, direct reports) correlated with executives job performance. Results revealed that competency feedback obtained from direct reports was the most valid predictor of performance. Implications for developmental and administrative decision making are discussed.

Fabio Sala, Hay/McBer

Stephen A. Dwight, Sepracor

Submitted by Fabio Sala, fabio_sala@haygroup.com 

141-36 Self-Efficacy Domain Relatedness and Intra-Role Criterion Specificity

Based on longitudinal field data analyzed by SEM, we show that domain-specific self-efficacy positively predicts the conceptually related domain, but negatively predicts the conceptually distinct performance domain. These findings imply that the use of a single specific self-efficacy measure for prediction of complex work roles can lead to misleading conclusions.

Alex Stajkovic, University of WisconsinMadison

Submitted by Alex Stajkovic, astajkovic@bus.wisc.edu 

141-37 Predicting Sources of Self-Efficacy Using Goal Orientation

This study examined the association between sources of self-efficacy and goal orientation. The findings indicate that individuals with different goal orientations seek out and attend to different sources of information to determine their overall self-efficacy beliefs. These results explain and extend previous research linking goal orientation and self-efficacy.

Maryalice Citera, SUNYNew Paltz

Jennifer Combs, SUNYNew Paltz

Submitted by Maryalice Citera, citeram@newpaltz.edu 

141-38 Self-Efficacy Interventions in Businesses:  The Boundaries of the Galatea Effect

We tested several boundary conditions of the Galatea effect including using nonfictitious psychological self-efficacy interventions with established adult professionals involved in on-the-job work activities within a business organization. Effects on performance were somewhat short-lived (1 month), but longer for other variables. In addition, we tested the self-fulfilling prophecy-at-work model.

D. Brian McNatt, University of Georgia

Timothy A. Judge, University of Florida

Submitted by D. Brian McNatt, bmcnatt@terry.uga.edu 

141-39 Flanagan Award Winner: Individual Differences in Leadership Emergence

This paper investigates the extent to which dispositional influences on leadership emergence have genetic causes. Results indicated that 35% of the variance in the latent construct of leadership emergence is due to genetic effects mediated by intelligence and the Big Five personality traits.

Remus Ilies, University of Florida

Timothy A. Judge, University of Florida

Megan Werner, University of Iowa

Submitted by Remus Ilies, iliesr@ufl.edu 

141-40 Test of a Path Model for Contextual Antecedents of Accountability

A lack of research in the accountability arena is compounded by the suggestions that the developmental nature of feedback systems lowers accountability within the system. The path model analyzed in this study examines the contextual variables (LMX and feedback environment) and their effects on accountability and self-development initiative.

Kelly Rutkowski, Florida Institute of Technology

Lisa A. Steelman, Florida Institute of Technology

Submitted by Kelly Rutkowski, kelrutkowsk@aol.com 

141-41 Meta-Analysis and Test for Partial Mediation Involving Goal Commitment

The purposes of this study were to (a) identify the precise nature of the goal commitmenttask performance relationship for assigned goals, (b) identify the relationship between goal commitment and assigned goal difficulty, and (c) test goal commitment as a partial mediator of the assigned goal difficultytask performance relationship.

Eric J. Barger, George Mason University

Tara D. Carpenter, George Mason University

Submitted by Eric J. Barger, eric11@mindspring.com 

141-42 Incremental Contribution of Trait Goal Orientation in Explaining Performance Variability

This study examines whether assessments of individuals goal orientation dispositions provide incremental contributions to understanding variance in performance over and above that offered by general mental ability and conscientiousness. Results indicate that trait learning and performance goal orientations do not meaningfully improve prediction (i.e., D MR = .007).

Arlise P. McKinney, Virginia Tech

Kevin D. Carlson, Virginia Tech

Submitted by Arlise P. McKinney, amckinne@vt.edu 

141-43 360-Feedback Evaluation and Turnover: Is There a Relationship?

This study looks at 360-feedback scores for employees who left a company compared to those who remained. Results indicate significant differences between the groups on managerial and some direct-report scores and the discrepancy between self- and manager scores.

Roni Reiter-Palmon, University of NebraskaOmaha

Elizabeth M. Haley, University of NebraskaOmaha

Submitted by Roni Reiter-Palmon, rreiter-palmon@mail.unomaha.edu 

141-44 Effects of Grouped Appraisal Feedback on High Performers

The effect of grouped versus distinctive feedback on high-performing employees was investigated. Feedback that shows a distinction between the performances of employees led to better subsequent performance by the previous top-performing employee. A significant interaction showed feedback to have a large effect on performance under equal pay conditions.

Jim Matchen, University of MissouriSt. Louis

James A. Breaugh, University of MissouriSt Louis

Submitted by Jim Matchen, s049507@admiral.umsl.edu 

141-45 Measurement Equivalence of Executives Performance:  Does Direct Report Gender Matter?

The present study examined the measurement equivalence of executives performance ratings when rated by men and women direct reports. Confirmatory factor analysis showed gender equivalence of ratings for both men and women executives.

Jason M. Etchegaray, University of Houston

Barbara B. Ellis, University of Houston

Maynard Goff, Personnel Decisions International

Submitted by Jason M. Etchegaray, JasonEtchegaray@yahoo.com 

141-46 SelfOther Rating Agreement in Multisource Feedback:  Antecedents and Correlates

The relationships between selfother rating agreement, proposed antecedents (analytic ability, self-acceptance, dominance, and flexibility), and correlates (leadership and judgment) were examined. Results supported hypotheses of analytic ability, dominance, and flexibility predicting self-rating overestimation. Limitations and implications of findings are discussed.

Elizabeth M. Smith, University of TennesseeKnoxville

Katie Helland, University of TennesseeKnoxville

Submitted by Elizabeth M. Smith, esmith2@utk.edu 

 

142. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 1:302:20 Grand West

Current Issues in Employee Survey Research

Leading experts from academia, consulting, and industry discuss a variety of topics likely to confront anyone conducting an employee opinion survey. Topics will come from the audience and include things such as sampling versus census methodologies, technology-based data collection methods, and the keys to using results to actually create change.

Roger E. Lipson, Kenexa, Chair

Allan H. Church, PepsiCo, Panelist

David W. Bracken, Mercer Delta, Panelist

Allen I. Kraut, Baruch College/Kraut Associates, Panelist

Submitted by Roger Lipson, roger.lipson@kenexa.com

 

143. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 1:302:50 Grand East

Merger of Equals: Implications for the I-O Practitioner

Realizing the full value of a merger of equals requires carefully planned and exceptionally executed efforts. This forum presents the contribution of five I-O practitioners in combining two large financial institutions. Topics to be discussed include merger due diligence, culture integration, selection and placement, integration metrics, and key talent retention.

Amy R. Carver, Wachovia Corporation, Co-Chair

Thomas J. Braun, Wachovia Corporation, Co-Chair

Amy R. Carver, Wachovia Corporation, The I-O Practitioners Involvement in Due Diligence

Rhonda McGown, Wachovia Corporation, Cultural Assessment and Integration in Two Merging Financial Services Organizations

Carol M. Oeth, Wachovia Corporation, Bob Brotherton, Wachovia Corporation, Selection and Placement in a Merger of Equals

Thomas J. Braun, Wachovia Corporation, Merger Integration Metrics: Tracking the Success of the Marriage

Thomas Rauzi, Wachovia Corporation, Balancing Talent Retention and Merger Integration Strategies

Submitted by Thomas J. Braun, tjbraun@peoplepc.com

 

144. Symposium: Saturday, 1:302:50 Conference F

Perceived Organizational Support: New Directions

We describe new research directions concerning perceived organizational support (POS). Two papers use structural equation modeling to examine how favorable treatment acts via POS to influence employee attitudes and behavior. The remaining two papers concern the influence of basic employment conditions and dispositional differences in employee motivation on POS.

Robert Eisenberger, University of Delaware, Chair

Kathryn M. Bartol, University of Maryland, Wei Liu, University of Maryland, Ian O. Williamson, University of Maryland, Viswaneth Venkatesh, University of Maryland, Antecedents and Outcomes of Perceived Organizational Support: Examination of a Mediating Model

Florence Stinglhamber, Catholic University of Louvain, Christian Vandenberghe, Catholic University of Louvain, Antecedents and Consequences of Perceived Support: A Longitudinal Investigation

Anika Gakovic, University of Houston, Lois E. Tetrick, University of Houston, Perceived Organizational Support and Types of Work Agreements: A Comparison of Part-time and Full-time Employees Employment

Robert Eisenberger, University of Delaware, Florence Stinglhamber, Catholic University of Louvain, Linda Rhoades, University of Delaware, Fairness and Perceived Organizational Support: Contributions of Collectivism and Competitiveness

Lynn M. Shore, Georgia State University, Discussant

Submitted by Robert Eisenberger, eisenber@udel.edu

 

145. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 1:302:50 Conference G

Executive/Leadership Education: New Models, New Challenges

Increasingly, Wall Street sees management as a key element of a companys future prospects. Consequently, leading companies are reexamining how they develop current and future leaders. This panel will address critical recent developments in Executive/Leadership Education as well as some implications and challenges. Panelists represent a range of differing perspectives.

John K. Kennedy, The EmpowerGroup, Ltd., Chair

Anna Marie Valerio, IBM, Panelist

Susan N. Palmer, University of North Carolina, Panelist

Melodie Jancerak, Center for Creative Leadership, Panelist

Leigh A. Hodges, The Empower Group, Ltd., Panelist

Submitted by John K. Kennedy, jackkennedy@empowergrp.com

 

146. Master Tutorial: Saturday, 1:302:20 Cinema 2

One CE Credit Available for Attending! Register at the Session.

Why Do People Become Outplaced?

This paper identifies links between personal constructs and outplacement. Implications for selection, career counseling and training are highlighted. Psychometric data is analysed to correlate experience of outplacement, personality, and job-search success. Staff are compared using psychometric data to identify differences which contribute to the likelihood and experience of outplacment.

Colin Selby, Selby MillSmith, Ltd, Presenter

Submitted by Colin Selby, colin.selby@virgin.net

 

147. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 1:302:50 Wentworth

EOS Follow-up Strategies to Impact Change: Pitfalls and Best Practices

EOS programs are used to initiate change within organizations. Action planning initiatives can originate within top management, individual workgroups, or a mixed approach. This panel discussion brings together practitioners from leading organizations to describe experiences with various follow-up strategies and point out pitfalls and best practices leading to successful change.

Van M. Latham, PathPoint Consulting, Chair

Tobin V. Anselmi, Dell Computer Corporation, Panelist

John Bachellor, Bank of America, Panelist

Joan Gutkowski, MTV Networks, Panelist

Seth Kamen, CVS, Panelist

Jennifer Mattocks, Questar, Panelist

Submitted by Van M. Latham, Vlatham@pathpointconsulting.com

 

148. Symposium: Saturday, 1:302:50 Kenora

News from the Dark Side: The Next Decades Counterproductivity Research

The past decade brought expanding definitions and understanding of employee counterproductivity, but what will the next decade bring? We provide an overview of the evolving counterproductivity construct and then present empirical studies of new manifestations of counterproductivity, including identity theft, personal use of work computers, and resistance to employee surveillance.

Wendi J. Everton, Eastern Connecticut State University, Co-Chair

Paul M. Mastrangelo, University of Baltimore, Co-Chair

Rebecca J. Bennett, University of Toledo, The Past, Present, and Future of Workplace Deviance Research

Judith M. Collins, Michigan State University, Tracy McGinley, Michigan State University, Information Security: An Integrated Theory and Empirical Analysis of Identity Fraud in The Workplace

Paul M. Mastrangelo, University of Baltimore, Wendi J. Everton, Eastern Connecticut State University, Jeffrey A. Jolton, Genesee Survey Services, Inc., Personal Use of Work Computers: Is It All Counterproductive?

Melissa Cohen, Bowling Green State University, Christiane Spitzmueller, Bowling Green State University, Jeffrey M. Stanton, Syracuse University, Measuring Employee Compliance and Resistance Intentions Toward Monitoring and Surveillance Policies and Practices

DeeAnn Gehlauf, Gehlauf & Associates, Inc., Discussant

Submitted by Paul M. Mastrangelo, pmastrangelo@ubmail.ubalt.edu

 

149. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 1:302:50 Kent

Linking Organizational Culture to Bottom Line Business Performance

This practitioner forum presents three studies that demonstrate a strong relationship between organizational culture and business performance. These studies report on the relationship between 12 behavioral measures of organizational culture developed by Denison and his colleagues and performance indicators such as customer satisfaction, sales growth, and return on shareholders equity.

Daniel R. Denison, International Institute for Management Development, Co-Chair

Stephanie A. Haaland, Central Michigan University, Co-Chair

William S. Neale, Denison Consulting, Linking Organizational Culture to Sales Growth

Stephanie A. Haaland, Central Michigan University, Linking Organizational Culture to Customer Satisfaction

Daniel R. Denison, International Institute for Management Development, Linking Organizational Culture to Return on Shareholders Equity

Michael Beer, Harvard University, Discussant

Submitted by Stephanie A. Haaland, stephmorlan@home.com

 

150. Symposium: Saturday, 1:302:50 Civic Ballroom

Rethinking Artifact Corrections in Meta-Analysis:  Innovations and Extensions

Correction for statistical artifacts is an essential part of meta-analysis and validity generalization procedures. Recent methodological advances allow greater accuracy in the estimation of artifact distributions, and provide more precise corrections for sampling error, unreliability, and study design effects.

Scott B. Morris, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chair

Michael T. Brannick, University of South Florida, Steve Hall, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Bayesian Estimates in Test Validation

Michael A. Gillespie, Michigan State University, Frederick L. Oswald, Michigan State University, Patrick D. Converse, Michigan State University, On Using Meta-Analysis to Make Judgments About Validity Generalization

Chockalingam Viswesvaran, Florida International University, Deniz S. Ones, University of Minnesota, Frank L. Schmidt, University of Iowa, Reliability Corrections in Meta-Analysis: Issues and Prospects

Scott B. Morris, Illinois Institute of Technology, Richard P. DeShon, Michigan State University, Combining Effect Sizes From Factorial Designs: A Generalizability Theory Perspective

Nambury S. Raju, Illinois Institute of Technology, Discussant

Submitted by Scott B. Morris, scott.morris@iit.edu

 

151. Conversation Hour: Saturday, 2:002:50 Essex

Meet the New SIOP Solutions Editorial Board

Come and learn about the new SIOP Solutions Seriesa book series being launched to provide decision makers with practical, how to advice for dealing with cutting-edge problems in organizations. The goal of the series is to market I-O psychology to managers, executives, and practitioners. Consider being an author!

Elaine D. Pulakos, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Co-Host

Ben E. Dowell, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Co-Host

Jerard F. Kehoe, AT&T, Co-Host

Lise M. Saari, IBM, Co-Host

Jeffery S. Schippmann, PepsiCo, Co-Host

Mark S. Teachout, USAA, Co-Host

Submitted by Elaine D. Pulakos, elainep@pdi-corp.com

 

152. Roundtable: Saturday, 2:002:50 Simcoe/Dufferin

Our Aging Workforce:  Three Alternative Perspectives for I-O Psychologists

This roundtable focuses on three alternative perspectives for studying age-related issues in organizations: work ability, social gerontology, and occupational health. Background information on each perspective will be presented, and a discussion will follow as to how these perspectives might contribute to current efforts of I-O psychologists to study older workers.

James W. Grosch, NIOSH, Co-Host

Janet L. Barnes-Farrell, University of Connecticut, Co-Host

Kenneth S. Shultz, California State UniversitySan Bernardino, Co-Host

Submitted by James W. Grosch, jkg9@cdc.gov

 

Coffee Break: Saturday 3:003:30 Multiple Locations

153. Special Event: Saturday, 3:305:20 Grand West

Revision of SIOPs Principles: Process, Outcomes, Q & As

Revision of the 1987 Principles for the Validation and Use of Personnel Selection Procedures was initiated by the Societys Executive Committee in April, 2000. An ad hoc Committee of 12 members was formed and has now completed a revision which will be made available to SIOPs membership on or about March 15, 2002. This invited session will describe the process followed by the Committee and give an overview of the major differences between the 1987 version and the latest version of the Principles. A significant portion of the time will be allotted for Q & As.

P. Richard Jeanneret, Jeanneret & Associates, Inc., Chair

 

154. Special Event: Saturday, 3:305:20 Grand Centre

The Canadian All Stars

Canadians have made significant contribution to the science and practice of I-O psychology. Gary Latham (University of Toronto) will take the role of Larry/Gary King and interview the All Star panel on Canadian issues regarding job analysis (Steven Cronshaw, University of Guelph), the selection interview (Patricia Rowe, University of Waterloo), performance appraisal (Lorne Sulsky, University of Calgary), leadership (Victor Vroom, Yale University), organization commitment (John Meyer, University of Western Ontario), motivation (Craig Pinder, University of Victoria), organizational justice (Daniel Skarlicki, University of British Columbia), and employee withdrawal (Gary Johns, Concordia University).

Gary P. Latham, University of Toronto, Chair

Steven F. Cronshaw, University of Guelph, Panelist

Patricia M. Rowe, University of Waterloo, Panelist

Lorne M. Sulsky, University of Calgary, Panelist

Victor H. Vroom, Yale University, Panelist

John P. Meyer, University of Western Ontario, Panelist

Daniel Skarlicki, University of British Columbia, Panelist

Gary W. Johns, Concordia University, Panelist

 

155. Symposium: Saturday, 3:304:50 Grand East

Coping with Incivility, Hostility, and Abuse in Work Interactions

The symposium explores the organizational and personal correlates of different forms of mistreatment, especially on low-power individuals. Incidence and effects of customer abuse of service employees and faculty abuse of students are introduced. Coping responses to these events are assessed for frequency and effectiveness, and potential interventions discussed.

Alicia A. Grandey, Pennsylvania State University, Chair

Steve M. Jex, University of WisconsinOshkosh, Paul E. Spector, University of South Florida, Interpersonal Conflict at Work: Organizational Context and Employee Disposition, Performance and Health

Analea Brauburger, Pennsylvania State University, Interpersonal Stress for Young Workers: Sources of and Coping with Mistreatment

Alicia A. Grandey, Pennsylvania State University, David N. Dickter, AT&T, Customer Verbal Abuse of Service Representatives: Consequences and Coping

Karen Jagatic, Wayne State University, Loraleigh Keashly, Wayne State University, Faculty Hostility Towards Professionals-in-Training: The Role of Educational Culture and Coping Style

Submitted by Alicia A. Grandey, aag6@psu.edu

 

156. Special Event: Saturday, 3:304:50 Conference B/C

Education and Training in I-O Psychology: Issues, Concerns, Questions:  Open Meeting with the Education and Training and Long Range Planning Committees

One suggestion from the 2001 conference was to hold a regular Open Meeting for individuals involved in educating the next generation of I-O psychologists. Members of the Education and Training and Long Range Planning Committees want to hear SIOP members concerns, issues, or questions with regard to education and training in the field.

Michael J. Burke, Tulane University, Co-Chair

Robert L. Dipboye, Rice University, Co-Chair

Katherine J. Klein, University of Maryland, Co-Chair

Laura L. Koppes, Eastern Kentucky University, Co-Chair

 

157. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 3:304:50 Conference D/E

I-O Industry Careers: A Sneak Peek Into Womens Career Choices

Five recent female I-O graduates along with Nancy Tippins, an established I-O psychologist, will share their career experiences. The panelists will discuss (a) the challenges and opportunities that have shaped their careers, (b) the pros/cons of working in industry, (c) the balance between work and personal life.

Wendy L. Richman-Hirsch, William M. Mercer, Inc., Co-Chair

Michelle A. Donovan, Intel Corporation, Co-Chair

Wendy L. Richman-Hirsch, William M. Mercer, Inc., Panelist

Michelle A. Donovan, Intel Corporation, Panelist

Kathleen J. Suckow, Microsoft Corporation, Panelist

Jennifer J. Deal, Center for Creative Leadership, Panelist

Sandra L. Fisher, Personnel Decisions Research Institute, Panelist

Nancy T. Tippins, Personnel Research Associates, Inc., Panelist

Submitted by Wendy L. Richman-Hirsch, wendy.hirsch@us.wmmercer.com

 

158. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 3:304:50 Conference F

Missing Links in Value Chains: Linkage Research Starting Further Upstream

Linking employee and customer surveys to each other and to the bottom line has become a widespread practice. Historically, most research has dealt with direct-service employees. Moving past this limitation, this session examines how both front-line and back-office employees (and the interplay between them) contribute to customer satisfaction.

Scott M. Brooks, Gantz Wiley Research, Chair

Daniel V. Lezotte, Illinois Institute of Technology, Nambury S. Raju, Illinois Institute of Technology, Isis Garcia, Illinois Institute of Technology, Amy K. Deno, Organizational Strategies, Inc., Linking Internal Service Quality to Customer Satisfaction: What Role Does Job Role Play?

S. Douglas Pugh, University of North CarolinaCharlotte, Joerg Dietz, University of Western Ontario, Scott M. Brooks, Gantz Wiley Research, Jack W. Wiley, Gantz Wiley Research, Employees are the Experts: Improving Linkage Research Through Differation Between Employee Functional Groups

Kyle Lundby, Questar Data Systems, Inc., Kristofer J. Fenlason, 3M, Employee, Customer, Financial Linkages for Boundary Spanning EmployeesPotential Differences in Volume Versus TLC

Stephanie D. Kendall, Gantz Wiley Research, Kerry R. Moechnig, Gantz Wiley Research, Internal Service Capabilities: What Predicts Effectiveness?

Submitted by Scott M. Brooks, Sbrooks@gantzwiley.com

 

159. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 3:305:20 Conference G

Organizational Trauma and Recovery

I-O psychologists are uniquely positioned to address both the individual employee and business issues involved in response and recovery from catastrophic events, like the September 11th terrorist attacks. This panel discusses trauma impact, immediate post-trauma needs and longer-term recovery for employees and organizations, and makes suggestions for research.

Jeanne Carsten, JP Morgan Chase, Chair

Walter Reichman, Baruch CollegeCUNY/Sirota Consulting, Panelist

Renee M. Kurowski, JP Morgan Chase, Panelist

David J. Weston, Hire2Win, LLC, Panelist

Dee Newson, University of South Florida, Panelist

William E. Wymer, UBS PaineWebber, Panelist

Submitted by Jeanne Carsten, Jeanne.Carsten@chase.com

 

160. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 3:304:50 Essex

Speeding Leader Effectiveness

In this interactive session, hear about applied research related to leveraging experiences, streaming leaders, and stimulating higher levels of job satisfaction and achievement. Learn how companies are speeding leader development in order to achieve strategic goals. Take away development resources and techniques for assessing the core capabilities of an organization.

Julian I. Barling, Queens University, Chair

Harvey A. Silver, Management Consultants Inc., Developing Leaders: The 4 Rs of Leadership

Paul T. Van Katwyk, Personnel Decisions International, Leveraging Experience in Leadership Development

Kathleen Grace, Jackson Leadership Systems Inc., Value Chain Analysis: Implications for Leadership Development

Submitted by Kathleen Grace, kgrace@jacksonleadership.com

 

161. Symposium: Saturday, 3:304:50 Windsor

Addressing Projected Workforce Shortages by Recruiting and Retaining Older Workers

One way to address predicted labor shortages will be to recruit and retain older workers. However, it is currently unclear how best to accomplish that goal. Therefore, in this symposium we present a mix of empirical and theoretical papers that address this issue from both the employee and employer perspectives.

Kenneth S. Shultz, California State UniversitySan Bernardino, Chair

Jasmin Loi, California State UniversitySan Bernardino, Kenneth S. Shultz, California State UniversitySan Bernardino, Why Older Adults Seek Employment: Differing Motivations Among Subgroups

Rachel A. August, California State UniversitySacramento, Meanings of Retirement for a New Generation of Workers

Mary Anne Taylor, Clemson University, Dennis Doverspike, University of Akron, Recruitment of Older Employees: A Research-Based Model

Greta Lax, University of WisconsinOshkosh, Gary A. Adams, University of WisconsinOshkosh, Factors Influencing Job Searches Among Older Adults Seeking Bridge Employment

Lisa Finkelstein, Northern Illinois University, Discussant

Submitted by Kenneth S. Shultz, kshultz@csusb.edu

 

162. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 3:304:50 York

Web-Based 360 Feedback is Old News: Where Do We Go Next?

Feedback (360-degree) is widely accepted and best practices have been known for quite some time. So, where do we go from here? This forum explores growth areas for 360 feedback. The next big advancements will not focus on logistics, but rather on finding new ways to enhance utilization and impact.

Dale S. Rose, 3-D Group, Chair

Mark C. Healy, 3-D Group, Dale S. Rose, 3-D Group, The Good, the Bad, and the Average: All 360 Participants are not Created Equal

Treena L. Gillespie, California State UniversityFullerton, Global 360: Balancing Consistency Across Cultures

Keith Goudy, Organizational Psychologists, Scott C. Thomas, DePaul University, A New Approach to Multisource Feedback: Feedback Participants Can Use

Dale S. Rose, 3-D Group, Tracy Farrell, San Francisco State University, The Use and Abuse of Comments in 360-Degree Feedback

William C. Byham, Development Dimensions International, Discussant

Submitted by Dale S. Rose, drose@3Dgroup.net

 

163. Special Event: Saturday, 3:304:20 Dominion North

Roundtable Session: Committee on Ethnic Minority Affairs (CEMA)

The host of this session will provide an update on the committees activities during the last year. Following this presentation, new committee members will be selected and new agenda items will be discussed. All SIOP conference participants interested in minority affairs are encouraged to attend. A reception will follow.

Dana G. McDonald-Mann, Development Dimensions International, Host

 

164. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 3:304:50 Dominion South

Realities, Insights, and Actions During Times of Economic Downturn and Change

Our team of consultants will discuss how, as OD professionals, we helped our organizations through the most challenging of times including reductions in force and spin-offs. We will discuss our approach for practical OD solutions and share some of our interventions.

Lyse Wells, Conexant Systems, Inc., Chair

Lyse Wells, Conexant Systems, Inc., The Swinging Pendulum: Reflections From the Search for the Best Structure for OD Support

Amy Fitzgibbons, Conexant Systems, Inc., How to Re-Engage When the Engagement Has Been Called Off: Dealing with the Aftermath of an Organizational Downsizing

Angela Dew, Louisiana State University, A Different Spin on a Downturn

Kristy D. Thomas, Mindspeed Technologies, Responding to Company Needs During Uncertain Times: Creating Quick Hit Tools

Judith A. Solecki, Conexant Systems, Inc., Discussant

Submitted by Lyse Wells, lyse.wells@conexant.com

 

165. Debate: Saturday, 3:304:50 Wentworth

Does Classical Measurement Theory Apply to I-O Psychology?  The Reliability of Job Performance Ratings

Supervisory ratings of job performance are commonly used in I-O psychology and assessing its reliability is important. Several questions have been debated in the literature. Is rater idiosyncratic variance error? Is shared variance halo? Are there parallel supervisors? A panel of experts address these issues in this debate.

Chockalingam Viswesvaran, Florida International University, Moderator

Deniz S. Ones, University of Minnesota, Chair

John P. Campbell, University of Minnesota, Presenter

Frank J. Landy, SHL, Presenter

Kevin R. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University, Presenter

Frank L. Schmidt, University of Iowa, Presenter

Submitted by Chockalingam Viswesvaran, vish@fiu.edu

 

166. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 3:304:50 Kenora

Leadership Development in High-Tech CompaniesThe Latest, Best Thinking

This practitioner forum will examine how leadership development and coaching creates leaders ready to face marketplace challenges in IBM, Motorola, 3M, and at smaller, emerging companies. Information on history, role of CEO, major features, the role of coaching, and future trends will be discussed.

Anna Marie Valerio, IBM, Co-Chair

Angela G. McDermott, McDermott Consulting, Co-Chair

Anna Marie Valerio, IBM, Don M. Moretti, Motorola, Kevin J. Nilan, 3M, Angela G. McDermott, McDermott Consulting, Robert J. Lee, Management Consultant, Leadership Development in High-Tech CompaniesThe Latest, Best Thinking

Robert J. Lee, Management Consultant, Discussant

Submitted by Angela G. McDermott, AngieMcDermott@austin.rr.com

 

167. Symposium: Saturday, 3:305:20 Huron

Situational Judgment Tests: Constructs, Validity, and Faking

Situational judgment tests are becoming increasingly popular among personnel selection practitioners. This symposium extends our knowledge of situational judgment tests by examining incremental validity, instruction set effects on faking and construct validity, relations between job experience and situational judgment, and efforts to expand the predictor construct space.

Fritz Drasgow, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, Chair

Matthew S. OConnell, Select International, Inc., Michael A. McDaniel, Virginia Commonwealth University, W. Lee Grubb, III, Virginia Commonwealth University, Nathan S. Hartman, Virginia Commonwealth University, Amie D. Lawrence, Select International, Inc., Incremental Validity of Situational Judgment Tests for Task and Contextual Performance

Nhung T. Nguyen, Lamar University, Michael A. McDaniel, Virginia Commonwealth University, Michael Biderman, University of TennesseeChattanooga, Response Instructions in Situational Judgment Tests: Effects on Faking and Construct Validity

Jeff A. Weekley, Kenexa, Robert E. Ployhart, George Mason University, Situational Judgment and Training Experience: Antecedents and Relationships With Performance

Michael A. Gillespie, Michigan State University, Frederick L. Oswald, Michigan State University, Neal W. Schmitt, Michigan State University, Lauren J. Manheim, Michigan State University, Brian Hahn Kim, Michigan State University, A Situational Judgment Test of College Success

Neal W. Schmitt, Michigan State University, Discussant

Submitted by Michael A. McDaniel, mamcdani@vcu.edu

 

168. Symposium: Saturday, 3:304:50 Kent

. . . In the Hidden Part, You Will Make Me to Know Wisdom

Invariably, with each new data analysis strategy, or with each new twist on existing strategies, comes a host of issues that we must tease apart before we can use those strategies properly. The papers in this symposium identify and explicate such issues as they relate to meta-analysis, structural equation modeling, and latent growth modeling.

Jose M. Cortina, George Mason University, Chair

Jeffrey R. Edwards, University of North Carolina, Tae Y. Kim, University of North Carolina, Moderation in Structural Equation Modeling: Specification, Estimation, and Interpretation Using Quadratic Structural Equations

Roxanne M. Laczo, University of Minnesota, Paul R. Sackett, University of Minnesota, Philip Bobko, Gettysburg College, Jose M. Cortina, George Mason University, Sampling Error in d with Unequal Ns: Correcting a Common Error

Herman Aguinis, University of ColoradoDenver, Michael C. Sturman, Cornell University, Charles A. Pierce, Montana State University, Refining the Integration of the Hunter-Schmidt and Hedges-Olkin Meta-Analytic Approaches

Paul D. Bliese, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Robert E. Ployhart, George Mason University, Growth Modeling as an Ill-Conceived Regression Analysis

Lawrence R. James, University of Tennessee, Discussant

Submitted by Jose M. Cortina, jcortina@gmu.edu

 

169. Roundtable: Saturday, 3:304:20 Simcoe/Dufferin

Group Learning: The Concept and Its Measurement

This discussion is designed to bring together researchers who are interested in the growing body of work on group learning. As with many emerging research areas, there is considerable variance in the use of the construct. We hope to define the construct space and identify gaps in research and measurement.

Paul S. Goodman, Carnegie Mellon University, Co-Host

Jeanne Wilson, College of William & Mary, Co-Host

Fernando Olivera, University of Western Ontario, Co-Host

Janis A. Cannon-Bowers, Naval Air Warfare Center, Co-Host

Submitted by Jeanne Wilson, jeanne.wilson@business.wm.edu

 

170. Symposium: Saturday, 3:305:20 Civic Ballroom

Underlying Processes Responsible for Beneficial Mentorships:  Implications of Emerging Research

This symposium presents research exploring the underlying psychological processes involved in effective mentorships. Five papers will be presented outlining factors that may be responsible for the success of these relationships. The advantages of mentorships in volatile, boundaryless organizations will also be discussed. Guidelines for practice and theory will be addressed.

Rachel Day, University of South Florida, Co-Chair

Tammy D. Allen, University of South Florida, Co-Chair

John J. Sosik, Pennsylvania State UniversityGreat Valley, Veronica Godshalk, Pennsylvania State UniversityGreat Valley, The Role of SelfOther Rating Agreement on Mentors Developmental Behavior

Lea Waters, The University of Melbourne, Protege-Mentor Fit in Perceptions of the Provision of Psychosocial Support: The Role of Personality, Job Involvement, Workload, and the Mentoring Relationship

Rachel Day, University of South Florida, Tammy D. Allen, University of South Florida, Why Are Proteges More Successful? Explaining the Mentoring-Career Success Relationship

Lillian T. Eby, University of Georgia, Stacy E. McManus, Concordia University, Proteges Most Positive Mentoring Experiences

Raymond A. Noe, The Ohio State University, David B. Greenberger, The Ohio State University, Sheng Wang, The Ohio State University, Mentor and Protege Benefits from Cross-functional Mentoring Relationships

Belle Rose Ragins, University of WisconsinMilwaukee, Discussant

Submitted by Rachel Day, rday@luna.cas.usf.edu

 

171. Poster Session: Saturday, 3:304:50 Sheraton Hall

Human Resource Management and Change

 

171-1 A Multilevel Study of the Personal Impact From Organizational Change

This study furthers research on individual reactions to change. Whereas most recent literature on individual-level outcomes of change has focused on attitudes and behavior, this study provides an understanding of the effects of change by assessing beliefs formed by individuals concerning the impact a change had on them personally.

Steven D. Caldwell, Georgia Institute of Technology

David M. Herold, Georgia Institute of Technology

Donald B. Fedor, Georgia Institute of Technology

Submitted by Steven D. Caldwell, steven.caldwell@mgt.gatech.edu 

171-2 Information Search and Personnel Selection Expertise:  Effects of Information Relevance

This study compared how experts and novices in the domain of personnel selection searched relevant and irrelevant information while making hiring decisions using an information board. Following from Shanteaus (1992) theory of expertise, level of expertise and information relevance moderated the quantity of information search and total information search time.

Jason Lebsack, University of NebraskaOmaha

Lisa L. Scherer, University of NebraskaOmaha

Submitted by Jason Lebsack, clnjal@qwest.net 

171-3 Enhancing Creative Problem Solving in Organizations

A vital step in creative problem solving is solution generation. We found that solution generation was enhanced by using objectives as an aid to elicit alternatives. Need for cognition (NC) was positively related to generating large numbers of alternatives, and the aid was equally effective across levels of NC.

Adam B. Butler, University of Northern Iowa

Lisa L. Scherer, University of NebraskaOmaha

Roni Reiter-Palmon, University of NebraskaOmaha

Submitted by Adam B. Butler, adam.butler@uni.edu 

171-4 Layoffs and Tradeoffs: Production, Quality, and Safety Under Job Insecurity

Employees often face a conflict between production, quality, and safety. It is important to understand the effects of increased layoffs on these potentially competing demands. This experiment found that participants threatened with layoffs were more productive, yet violated more safety rules and produced lower-quality outputs, than control participants.

Tahira M. Probst, Washington State UniversityVancouver

Submitted by Tahira M. Probst, probst@vancouver.wsu.edu 

171-5 Linking Personality to Effective Leader Behavior

A model based upon personality, self-regulation and functional leadership theory was hypothesized to explain effective leader behaviors. Sixty-three leaders completed a battery of individual difference measures and were videotaped while participating in a group activity. The model was partially supported, however none of the Big Five dimensions were fully mediated.

Will Franks, Southwest Missouri State University

Carol F. Shoptaugh, Southwest Missouri State University

Thomas D. Kane, Southwest Missouri State University

Submitted by Carol F. Shoptaugh, cfs280f@smsu.edu 

171-6 When Success Breeds Failure: History, Hysteresis, and Delayed Exit Decisions

In a repeated escalation situation, participants receiving equivocal feedback invested more money and over more opportunities; those who could purchase information invested fewer resources and exited sooner than subjects who did not have the opportunity. Prior experience in a successful venture led to later increased investing when faced with failure.

Donald A. Hantula, Temple University

Jennifer D. Bragger, Montclair State University

Donald Bragger, StorageApps

Jean P. Kirnan, College of New Jersey

Eugene J. Kutcher, PriceWaterhouseCoopers

Submitted by Donald A. Hantula, hantula@temple.edu 

171-7 Peer Nominations Easily Rival Peer Ratings in Predicting Managerial Success

Nominations of top-rated peers correlate in the .90s with the results of complete peer ratings, in this study of 283 middle managers and executives in a firms training program. With less effort to obtain the data, peer nominations predict performance appraisals and promotions just as well as ratings.

Allen I. Kraut, Baruch College/Kraut Associates

Submitted by Allen I. Kraut, allenkraut@aol.com 

171-8 Procedural Justice and Layoff Survivors Commitment: A Quantitative Review

Many layoff studies have examined the correlation between procedural justice and the organizational commitment of layoff survivors. These studies have yielded positive correlations that vary widely. The purpose of this study was to estimate the population correlation and identify the primary sources that cause variation in the correlation across studies.

W. Lee Grubb, III, Virginia Commonwealth University

Michael A. McDaniel, Virginia Commonwealth University

Submitted by Michael A. McDaniel, mamcdani@vcu.edu 

171-9 Attentional Advice:  Effects on Immediate, Delayed, and Transfer Task Performance

The effects of providing attentional advice before practice on immediate, delayed, and transfer performance were examined. Participants engaged in procedural product assembly tasks with supply management duties. Those who received attentional advice made higher profits than those not receiving advice. The benefits of attentional advice to facilitate training are discussed.

Jeff Foster, University of MissouriSt. Louis

Therese H. Macan, University of MissouriSt Louis

Submitted by Therese H. Macan, Therese.Macan@UMSL.edu 

171-10 An Investigation of How Managers Respond to Utility Analysis Information

Research on providing utility analysis (UA) information has shown little to no effects on acceptance of selection tests. Ninety-eight managers provided reactions to UA information. Previous findings are replicated but managers ranked UA information to be useful and influential. Contextual factors also had moderating effects on UA acceptance rates.

Jeff Foster, University of MissouriSt. Louis

Therese H. Macan, University of MissouriSt Louis 

Submitted by Therese H. Macan, Therese.Macan@UMSL.edu 

171-11 Conformity in Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Decision-Making Groups

This study examines the influence of gender and discussion setting (face-to-face versus CMC) on three outcomes. The results revealed that males and females in face-to-face groups were significantly more likely to conform, more confident in group solutions, and more satisfied with the group process than individuals in CMC groups.

Michael P. Sherman, Wayne State University

Marcus W. Dickson, Wayne State University

Submitted by Michael P. Sherman, msherman@sun.science.wayne.edu 

171-12 Modes of Measuring Self-Regulation:  Appropriate Assessment of the Construct?

While the construct of self-regulation has increased its presence in a variety of psychological literatures in recent years, its assessment has been inconsistent at best. Data suggest that one dominant way of measuring self-regulation, the traditional Likert-type measure, may be inadequate given our theoretical understanding of the construct.

Morell E. Mullins, Bowling Green State University

Shelba A. Devendorf, Bowling Green State University

Submitted by Morell E. Mullins, mullinm@bgnet.bgsu.edu 

171-13 Assessing the Construct Validity of a Measure of Learning Agility

This study examined the construct validity of the Choices Questionnaire that supports the theory of learning agility. Learning agility predicts an individuals potential to learn in new tasks or jobs. The construct validity will be measured by examining the Choices Questionnaire against a cognitive ability measure and a personality measure.

James Connolly, Aon Management Consulting Group

Chockalingam Viswesvaran, Florida International University

Submitted by James Connolly, james_j_connolly@aoncons.com 

171-14 Enhancing Transfer of Training: The Role of Situational Factors

In this field study, transfer-of-training climate, perceived accountability, and perceptions of legitimacy are predicted to positively relate to transfer of training, as evaluated by trainees supervisors. Results indicate that transfer-of-training climate is positively related to perceived accountability and to transfer of training.

Robin A. Cheramie, Louisiana State University

Marcia J. Simmering, Lousiana State University

Submitted by Robin A. Cheramie, rchera2@lsu.edu 

171-15 Anticipated Regret in Risky Decisions: Risk Preference as a Moderator

This study investigated two theories involving risky behavior: a personality theory that says individuals have a general risk-taking disposition and a regret-minimizing theory that says individuals choose the option with the least potential for regret. This study found support for both theories, as well as partial support for an interaction.

Rebecca R. Harris, Pennsylvania State University

Susan Mohammed, Pennsylvania State University

Submitted by Rebecca R. Harris, rrh134@psu.edu 

171-16 Faculty Barriers to Family-Friendly Policies: Snapshots from the Ivory Tower

This paper outlines current trends in research regarding barriers to the use of family-friendly policies in organizations. Interestingly, this study explores the unique constraints faced by faculty with regard to policy use. Finally, a qualitative approach to research and analyses is used to uncover perceived barriers and encourage future research.

Rebecca R. Harris, Pennsylvania State University

Candace E. Blair, Pennsylvania State University

Alicia A. Grandey, Pennsylvania State University

Submitted by Rebecca R. Harris, rrh134@psu.edu 

171-17 Employee Commitment Under Conditions of Change: A Longitudinal Study

We conducted a longitudinal study to examine the dynamic relations between employee commitment (to the organization and to a change initiative) and behavior (turnover intention and support for the change) during organizational change. Changes in commitment were found to predict changes in behavior, and relations were stronger for target-relevant commitments.

Laryssa Topolnytsky, University of Western Ontario

John P. Meyer, University of Western Ontario

Submitted by John P. Meyer, meyer@uwo.ca 

171-18 Assessing Goldbergs International Personality Item Pool:  A Multitrait-Multimethod Examination

This study provided preliminary evidence on the construct validity of Goldbergs measure by comparing it to the NEO-FFI. Structural equation modeling was used to conduct the multitrait-multimethod analyses. Overall, a model of five correlated trait factors and one method factor provided the best fit for the data.

Beng-Chong Lim, University of Maryland

Robert E. Ployhart, George Mason University

Submitted by Beng-Chong Lim, blim@psyc.umd.edu 

171-19 Exploring Factors Related to Energy Conservation Behaviors in Organizations

This study explores the factors that inhibit and facilitate energy conservation in organizations, using focus groups and surveys. It was found that knowledge of how to conserve energy, social norms, personal responsibility, and beliefs about the importance of conserving energy are related to reported conservation behaviors. Implications are discussed.

Paula M. Popovich, Ohio University

Scott Finlinson, Ohio University

Charles A. Scherbaum, Ohio University

Sherwood Wilson, The Ohio University

Kris Hoffer, VESTAR, Inc.

Andy Sinozich, VESTAR, Inc.

Submitted by Paula M. Popovich, popovich@ohiou.edu 

171-20 Personality and Company Culture:  Contributions to Innovation for Small Businesses

The present study proposed that personality traits would relate to the support for innovation, support of innovation would relate to innovation rate, and innovation rate would relate to financial performance. Support was found for all of these relationships. Supporting innovation served as a source of competitive advantage for small businesses.

Mark Brendle, Clemson University

Fred S. Switzer, Clemson University

Wayne H. Stewart, Clemson University

Caron H. St. John, Clemson University

Submitted by Mark Brendle, mbrendl@clemson.edu 

171-21 Effects of Job-Related Variables on Positive and Negative Creativity

Positively and negatively directed creativity were investigated using situational and individual-difference variables. The results indicated that perceiving organizational injustices led to suppressed levels of positive and negative creativity. People with many negative ideas, people with few positive emotions, and females with high organizational cynicism were found to generate more negative creativity.

Kimberly C. Hastey, Colorado State University

Keith James, Colorado State University

Submitted by Kimberly C. Hastey, khastey@lamar.colostate.edu 

171-22 The Manager-Consultant Relationship:  Implementation Success of Organizational Change

The purpose of this study was to examine how negative expectations, cynicism, relationship with a consultant, and manager change skills influenced client satisfaction and engagement success in organizational change. Relationship with the consultant predicted client satisfaction, which in turn predicted engagement success.

Stefanie A. Pressl, Lockheed Federal Credit Union

Janet L. Kottke, California State University

Submitted by Janet L. Kottke, jkottke@csusb.edu 

171-23 The Changing Nature of Sexual Harassment

This research examined differences in sexual harassment perceptions depending on the communication medium (online or face-to-face). Online behavior was perceived similarly, and in some cases, more harassing than face-to-face behavior. In a second study, attributions of responsibility and other reactions to the behaviors are examined in greater detail.

Barbara A. Ritter, University of Akron

Dennis Doverspike, University of Akron

Submitted by Barbara A. Ritter, britter@uakron.edu 

171-24 Is There a Technology Age Gap?

This study explored the extent to which older, middle-aged, and younger computer programmers reported different levels of human capital and specialized computer skills. It also explored the effect of age on annual salary and job benefits controlling for both human capital factors and specialized computer skills.

Elissa L. Perry, Teachers College, Columbia University

Patricia A Simpson, Loyola UniversityChicago

Orla M. NicDomhnaill, Teachers College, Columbia University

Deanna M. Siegel, Teachers College, Columbia University

Submitted by Elissa L. Perry, ep248@columbia.edu 

171-25 Comprehension of Complex Data Under Different Display Conditions

The study investigated the effects of display type, display complexity, user experience, and question difficulty on the performance of people processing on-screen data. The results showed that graphs were superior to tables for difficult questions, and the experienced users responded slower and explored more screen elements than novice users.

B. Charles Tatum, National University

David Dickason, Navy Personnel Research, Studies and Technology

Submitted by B. Charles Tatum, ctatum@nu.edu 

171-26 Relationships Between Conscientiousness, Self-Efficacy, Self-Deception, and Learning Over Time

The present study examined the dual mediating effects of self-efficacy and self-deception on the conscientiousnesslearning relationship. The results showed that both self-efficacy and self-deception mediated the effect of conscientiousness on learning but in opposite directions. Furthermore, the relative impact of self-efficacy and self-deception on learning changed over time as expected.

Sunhee Lee, The Ohio State University

Howard J. Klein, The Ohio State University

Submitted by Sunhee Lee, lee.912@osu.edu 

171-27 Assessing Job Applicants: The Influence of Selection Methods and Constructs

The present study examined selection and job applicant evaluations as a function of specific selection methods and constructs. A total of 277 HR practitioners each evaluated a single hypothetical job applicant. Those applicants assessed through some measure of Conscientiousness via an interview were rated most favorably overall.

David J. Topor, Performance Engineering

Stephen M. Colarelli, Central Michigan University

Submitted by David J. Topor, david.topor@tri-c.cc.oh.us 

171-28 Emerging Themes in Distance Learning: Some Food for Thought

Distance learning programs are being implemented throughout academia and industry. Researchers have not been able to keep up with practice, and consequently, practitioners have been implementing distance learning programs using the guidelines and principles developed for and validated in traditional classrooms. We identify recent themes in distance learning research.

Mary Kosarzycki, University of Central Florida

Eduardo Salas, University of Central Florida

C. Shawn Burke, University of Central Florida

Stephen M. Fiore, University of Central Florida

Submitted by Mary Kosarzycki, rombert@aol.com 

171-29 Can Conscientiousness Help Explain Escalation of Commitment Behavior?

This study examines the association between several sub-facets of conscientiousness and escalation behavior. It replicates Boehne and Paeses (2000) study, in which they support the project completion explanation of escalation behavior. Several sub-facets were associated with escalation behavior. Both project completion and profit motive explanations of escalation behavior were supported.

Robert D. Yonker, University of MissouriSt. Louis

Paul W. Paese, University of MissouriSt Louis

Submitted by Robert D. Yonker, s1023166@admiral.umsl.edu 

171-30 Predicting Transfer of Training: A Four-Country Study

The validity of the trainee characteristic element of Baldwin and Fords (1988) transfer of training model was tested using data from four countries. The findings support the motivation-transfer relationship but not the job involvement-transfer relationship.

Shreya T. Sarkar-Barney, Human Capital Growth/IIT

Submitted by Shreya T. Sarkar-Barney, sarkarbarney@yahoo.com 

171-31 Effects of Group Size and Problem Difficulty on Decision Accuracy

Decisions made by groups were more accurate than the initial responses of their individual members. As group size increased from 2 to 5 members, the superiority of group over individual accuracy increased from 8.8% to 15.2%. The more difficult the problem, the greater the superiority of groups over individuals.

Ira T. Kaplan, Hofstra University

Submitted by Ira T. Kaplan, ira.kaplan@hofstra.edu 

171-32 Importance of Learning and Development Opportunity to Job Choice Decisions

Examined the degree to which job seekers valued and would seek development opportunities. Experiment 1 (utilizing rating and ranking scales) and Experiment 2 (utilizing policy capturing) found that development opportunity is an important consideration in job choice decisions especially for decisions to accept rather than apply for a job.

Francisco Gabriel Barbeite, Georgia Institute of Technology

Todd J. Maurer, Georgia Institute of Technology

Submitted by Francisco Gabriel Barbeite, gt7556a@prism.gatech.edu 

171-33 The Development of a Creativity Instrument for Organizations

This paper examines the design and preliminary validation of a new forced-choice instrument for the identification of creative individuals in organizations. The new scale shows both discriminate and convergent validity with known creativity indicators. Implications are discussed.

Sam T. Hunter, University of Southern Mississippi

Richard Metzger, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Submitted by Sam T. Hunter, Hunterst107@Yahoo.com 

171-34 Effects of Alternative Presentations of Negative Information on Job Expectations

In the context of a job preview, we investigated how the presentation of negative information affects job-seeker perceptions of the job and organization. Findings suggest that the use of negative information packaging strategies leads to different levels of attraction to the job and trust in the organization.

Margaret E. Brooks-Laber, Bowling Green State University

Scott Highhouse, Bowling Green State University

Submitted by Margaret E. Brooks-Laber, mlaber@bgnet.bgsu.edu 

171-35 Sex Differences in Self-Efficacy: Effects of Training Delivery Context

The current study examined whether pretraining self-efficacy differed between men and women participating in traditionally masculine tasks and, if so, whether sex differences could be mitigated by manipulating the training delivery context. Results indicated that womens self-efficacy increased when using instructions containing feminine pronouns while mens self-efficacy remained constant.

Jenny Post, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Lauri Hyers, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Jeffrey D. Kudisch, University of Southern Mississippi

Submitted by Jeffrey D. Kudisch, j.kudisch@usm.edu 

171-36 Strategic Integration of HRM, Competitive Strategy, Turnover, and Organizational Performance

This study examines the impact of integrating the HR function with corporate strategy processes on organizational performance. Results from a sample of 272 Australian businesses indicate that such integration diminishes employee turnover and improves both HR outcomes and operational performance. For market performance, integration effects were moderated by competitive strategy.

Neal Knight-Turvey, University of QueenslandAustralia

Submitted by Neal Knight-Turvey, neal@psy.uq.edu.au 

171-37 Issues in Implementing Tactical Utility Analysis

Tactical Utility Analysis (TUA) is a modified approach to utility analysis that allows the decision support capabilities of UA to be extended beyond programmatic decisions to more of the day-to-day tactical HRM decisions faced by line managers. We examine TUA methods and the challenges associated with implementing TUA in organizations.

Kevin D. Carlson, Virginia Tech

Mary L. Connerley, Virginia Tech

Submitted by Mary L. Connerley, maryc@vt.edu 

171-38 Greenfield Plants: Catalysts of Change

Greenfields are recognized as one of the most successful organizational strategies of the last decade, yet evaluation of these new plants has been limited. Proposed as catalysts of change within organizations, greenfields share a unique management philosophy and implementation of high-performance work practices. Developmental and longitudinal studies are needed.

Wendy S. Becker, University at AlbanySUNY

Submitted by Wendy S. Becker, w.becker@albany.edu 

171-39 Environmental Control and Workplace Design on Performance, Effectiveness, and Collaboration

The relationships between office workplace design factors (layout and storage) and individual performance, team collaboration, and team effectiveness, were tested with 117 office workers using surveys. Environmental control was hypothesized to link these relationships. Mediating effects were not found, however, direct effects among these tested variables were significant.

Yueng-Hsiang E Huang, Liberty Mutual Research Center

Michelle Robertson, Liberty Mutual Research Center

Submitted by Yueng-Hsiang E Huang, yueng-hsiang.huang@Libertymutual.com 

171-40 Industrial-Organizational Psychology Programs Comprehensive Exam Procedures and Practices

This research characterizes current comprehensive exam practices and procedures in I-O psychology graduate programs. Results indicate that purpose, content, and structures are useful variables for differentiating programs. Differences in organizational outcomes by these variables are reported, as well as, faculty, student, and alumni responses regarding practices associated with the exam.

Lisa A. Boyce, George Mason University

Tara D. Carpenter, George Mason University

Kara A. Incalcaterra, George Mason University

Submitted by Lisa A. Boyce, Boycela@msn.com 

171-41 The Use of Simulation and Training Effectiveness: A Meta-Analysis

The purpose of this meta-analysis is to quantify the effectiveness of simulator training and identify moderators of the simulator-training effectiveness relationship. The use of simulators was weakly related to training performance. Fidelity was identified as a moderator of the relationship between the use of simulation and training effectiveness.

Tara D. Carpenter, George Mason University

Eric J. Barger, George Mason University

Submitted by Eric J. Barger, eric11@mindspring.com 

171-42 Collaborative Relationships Among Older Workers:
Compensating for Age-Related Deficits

Competing theories suggest older employees (a) should become more selective in workplace commitments, and, in contrast, (b) should use social involvement to compensate for age-related decrements. Study results indicate work-relationships help compensate for age-related issues and serve as important support systems in the workplace.

James H. Killian, University of Tulsa

Robert O. Hansson, University of Tulsa

Brendan C. Lynch, University of Tulsa

Submitted by James H. Killian, james-killian@utulsa.edu 

171-43 Understanding The Strategic Motivations For Outsourcing HR Activities

We examined strategic objectives for outsourcing HR practices. Results indicate that realizing cost benefits is associated with outsourcing administrative practices (benefits/payroll) while accessing external expertise is related to outsourcing technical practices (legal/HRIS). Operational practices (training/development/recruitment/selection) are associated with both objectives.

David P. Lepak, University of Maryland

Kathryn M. Bartol, University of Maryland

Sharyn Gardner, University of Maryland

Submitted by Sharyn Gardner, sgardner@rhsmith.umd.edu 

171-44 A Causal Model of Accident Frequency and Severity

Previous research has identified personality correlates of accidents, although much of this work has been conducted in the absence of a theoretical framework. We used the five-factor model of personality and causal modeling to predict accident frequency and severity. Results provided some support for the causal model.

Michael J. Garrity, Clemson University

Patrick H. Raymark, Clemson University

Submitted by Michael J. Garrity, mgarrit@clemson.edu 

171-45 Evaluating an Upper-Extremity Functioning Measure for Students

Two million workers suffer upper extremity (musculoskeletal) disorders (UEDs) each year costing billions of dollars. Students also suffer UEDs due to excessive computer usage. Preventive measures to reduce students UEDs before they begin work require appropriate assessment. Item response theory was used to evaluate a UED-functioning scale for students.

Lacey L. Schmidt, University of Houston

Benjamin C. Amick III, University of Texas Health Science Center

Jeffrey N. Katz, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard

Barbara B. Ellis, University of Houston

Submitted by Lacey L. Schmidt, laceys@pdq.net 

171-46 Pre-Discussion Dissent Improves Decision Quality in Groups

An experimental study on group decision making in hidden profile situations is reported. As predicted, dissent in prediscussion preferences increased consideration of unshared information and led to better group decisions. Furthermore, dissent was especially productive in groups in which one member held a preference for the superior alternative.

Rudolf Kerschreiter, Ludwig-MaximiliansUniversity Munich

Felix C. Brodbeck, Aston University

Stefan Schulz-Hardt, Ludwig-MaximiliansUniversity Munich

Andreas Mojzisch, Ludwig-MaximiliansUniversity Munich

Dieter Frey, Ludwig-MaximiliansUniversity Munich

Submitted by Rudolf Kerschreiter, kerschreiter@psy.uni-muenchen.de 

171-47 Nations Under Stress: Masculinity/Femininity and Stress Responses

This study examines the relationships between the masculinity/femininity dimension of national culture, perceived stress, and burnout. Results indicate that perceived stress fully mediates the culture-burnout relationship. Practical implications of these results are discussed, and recommendations for future empirical inquiry are made.

Suzanne Zivnuska, Florida State University

David A. Ralston, University of Connecticut

Pamela L. Perrewe, Florida State University

Alan Wallace, Mesa State College

Isabelle Maignan, The University of Groningen

Submitted by Suzanne Zivnuska, szivnuska@yahoo.com 

171-48 Effects of Definitional Explicitness and Rating Method on Creativity Assessment

This study explored the effects of different creative performance-assessment techniques on interrater reliability. Judges rated solutions generated to an ill-defined organizational problem using one of three techniques. Results showed that rating the components of a creative output, originality and appropriateness, separately produced the highest interrater reliability.

Jody J. Illies, St. Cloud State University

Lisa M. Kobe, CPS Human Resource Services

Roni Reiter-Palmon, University of NebraskaOmaha

Submitted by Jody J. Illies, jjillies@stcloudstate.edu 

171-49 Transformational Leadership, Individual Values, and Creativity:  Evidence from Korea

We investigate relations between dimensions of transformational leadership and creativity at the dyad level. In a sample of R&D employees working in 46 Korean companies, we found that intellectual stimulation, individualized consideration, and charisma/inspirational influence had positive effects on followers creativity. We also found some interesting mediating and moderating effects.

Shung Jae Shin, Texas A&M University

Jing Zhou, Texas A&M University

Submitted by Shung Jae Shin, sjshin@cgsb.tamu.edu 

171-50 Predicting Workplace Aggression in Part-Time Teenage Employees

This study examines (a) whether interactional injustice, supervisory over-control, and abusive supervision directed towards teenage employees predicts aggression towards supervisors, and (b) whether teenagers reasons for working and job involvement moderate these relationships. The present data provides strong support for the moderating impact of these variables on teenage workersaggression.

Kathryne E. Dupre, Queens University

Michelle Inness, Queens University

Julian I. Barling, Queens University

Catherine Connelly, Queens University

Colette Hoption, Queens University

Submitted by Kathryne E. Dupre, 9ked@qlink.queensu.ca 

171-51 Applicants Failing Drug Tests: Desirable or Undesirable Predictor Scores?

How do predictor scores of applicants who fail preemployment drug testing compare to those who pass? The current study examines this question and how this information may be used to position drug testing within a selection process in a manner that is efficient, economical, and benefits diversity hiring goals.

Jennifer M. Hurd, Aon Consulting

Matthew Dreyer, Aon Consulting

Submitted by Matthew Dreyer, matthew_j_dreyer@aoncons.com 

171-52 Effectiveness of Distance Learning for Army Battle Staff Training

This paper compared two distance-learning approaches to traditional classroom training in the U.S. Army. Course satisfaction, knowledge retention, and job performance were measured. Students were less satisfied with the distance-learning version of the course; however, all students performed equally regarding knowledge retention and received equivalent supervisory job performance ratings.

Debra J. Drenth, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Robert A. Wisher, U.S. Army Research Institute

Ulf Chris Kubisiak, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Christina K. Curnow, Caliber Associates

Walter C. Borman, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Submitted by Debra J. Drenth, ddrenth@luna.cas.usf.edu

 

172. Special Event: Saturday, 4:305:20 Elgin

Reception: Committee on Ethnic Minority Affairs (CEMA)

All SIOP conference participants are invited to attend this reception. This is an excellent opportunity to meet others with similar interests and to learn more about this committee.

Dana G. McDonald-Mann, Development Dimensions International, Host

 

173. Roundtable: Saturday, 4:305:20 Simcoe/Dufferin

The Path to Executive CoachingWhere Do I Begin?

Executive coaching has become increasingly popular in organizations. Yet, few I-O programs provide training in this area. How does one accumulate the knowledge and necessary experience to embark on a coaching career? Two leading executive coaches from diverse backgrounds (I-O and clinical) present their ideas on training and educating coaches.

Rodney Warrenfeltz, Hogan Assessment Systems, Co-Host

Theodore C. Bililies, Personnel Dimensions International, Inc., Co-Host

Lori Marrs, Hogan Assessment Systems, Co-Host

Sarah A. Strupeck, University of Tulsa, Co-Host

Dayna L. Tomlin, University of Tulsa, Co-Host

Submitted by Lori Marrs, tmarrs3@aol.com

 

Evening Reception: Saturday, 6:308:30 Grand Ballroom

 

119. Roundtable: Saturday, 12:0012:50 Conference D/E

I-O Psychologists Strategic Role in 21st-Century Corporations

Business leaders across the world are searching for a vision of the future. Supported by extensive research into life in 21st century corporations, this session will stimulate discussion of factors that will help participants plan the role for I-O psychologists in the workplace of the 21st century.

John R. Leonard, Hewitt Associates LLC, Co-Host

Jared D. Lock, Hogan Assessment Systems, Co-Host

Submitted by John R. Leonard, john.leonard@hewitt.com

 

120. Symposium: Saturday, 12:001:20 Conference F

Social and Emotional Influences on Job Satisfaction:  Complementary Puzzle Pieces

This symposium integrates basic research on the social and emotional aspects of job satisfaction. Utilizing classic (social information processing and social power) and emergent (affective events theory and emotional labor) paradigms, we present four studies demonstrating the importance of these factors in predicting job satisfaction.

Catherine S. Daus, Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville, Chair

Stephen Axelrad, St. Louis University, Richard D. Harvey, St. Louis University, Investigating the Informational Influence of Coworkers on the Formation of Job Satisfaction among New Workers

Richard L. Gossett, Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville, The Impact of Supervisor Power on Employee Job Satisfaction as Mediated by Mood

Catherine S. Daus, Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville, Dissatisfaction as a Result of Emotional Labor

Andrew Miner, University of Minnesota, Theresa M. Glomb, University of Minnesota, Charles L. Hulin, University of Illinois, Using Experience-Sampled Data to Investigate Relations Among Aggregated Work Mood, Job Satisfaction, and Behaviors

Howard M. Weiss, Purdue University, Discussant

Submitted by Catherine S. Daus, cdaus@siue.edu 

 

121. Symposium: Saturday, 12:001:20 Conference G

Defining, Measuring, and Creating a Positive Climate for Diversity

Despite predictions that increased diversity will force organizations to alter their climate to accommodate and take advantage of diverse employees, very little is known about what constitutes an affirming climate for diversity. This symposium will address this issue by empirically examining various definitions, models, and measurement tools for diversity climate.

Donna Chrobot-Mason, University of ColoradoDenver, Chair

Quinetta M. Roberson, Cornell University, D. Brent Smith, Rice University, Disentangling Diversity and Inclusion

Ellen E. Kossek, Michigan State University, Karen S. Markel, Michigan State, Patrick McHugh, George Washington University, Trickling Organizational Demographic Change in Sex and Race Composition: Shaping Ambiguous Group Social Climates for Diversity

Donna Chrobot-Mason, University of ColoradoDenver, Nicholas Aramovich, University of ColoradoDenver, Assessing the Multicultural Organization: A Comparison of Whites and Non-Whites

Keith James, Colorado State University, Assessing Value Differences among Workers from Divergent Cultural Backgrounds: Implications for Climate and Worker Health

Belle Rose Ragins, University of WisconsinMilwaukee, Discussant

Jeanette N. Cleveland, Penn State University, Discussant

Submitted by Donna Chrobot-Mason, dchrobot@carbon.cudenver.edu

 

122. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 12:001:20 York

Talent Management Strategies for Leadership Growth and Continuity

Presenters will discuss how their talent-planning systems have evolved to address changing business demands and a growing emphasis on human capital. They will describe their talent-management practices and how they are integrated with other HR and business-planning processes and broader leadership development efforts.

Thomas W. Mason, Personnel Decisions International, Chair

Lorrina J. Eastman, Bank of America, Adam Ortiz, Bank of America, Michael L. Trusty, Bank of America, Leveraging Talent Management to Support a Changing Business Strategy and Leadership Demands

Bernard G. Bedon, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Claudia Pezzina, Hofstra University, Talent Management as Competitive Advantage

James H. Brooks, Cisco Systems, Inc., Evolving Talent Management Strategies in a Turbulent Economy

Submitted by Michael L. Trusty, mike.trusty@BankofAmerica.com

 

123. Special Event: Saturday, 12:0012:50 Dominion North

Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award:  Dilemmas in I-O Psychology: A Search for Balance

Using research on feedback, performance appraisal accuracy, and motivation in teams, two perspectives are compared and evaluated. One is that of accepting inherent dilemmas, then mapping the tensions in the space; the other is searching for specific solutions to problems.

Terence R. Mitchell, University of Washington, Chair

Daniel R. Ilgen, Michigan State University, Presenter

 

124. Symposium: Saturday, 12:0012:50 Dominion South

From Personality to Profits

The papers in this symposium collectively test and find support for a framework beginning with unit leader personality and ending with unit sales with the following intermediate linkages: unit leader behavior, unit service climate and organizational citizenship behavior, and then customer satisfaction and unit sales.

Benjamin Schneider, University of Maryland, Chair

Jessica Lynne Saltz, University of Maryland, Benjamin Schneider, University of Maryland, Mark Ehrhart, San Diego State University, David Mayer, University of Maryland, Leader Personality and Leader Behavior: Necessary Ingredients for Service

Mark Ehrhart, San Diego State University, Servant-Leadership and Justice Climate: Antecedents of Unit-Level Organizational Citizenship Behavior

Kathryn Niles-Jolly, U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Organizational Citizenship Behavior and Service Quality: A Group Level Analysis

David Mayer, University of Maryland, Benjamin Schneider, University of Maryland, Jessica Lynne Saltz, University of Maryland, Mark Ehrhart, San Diego State University, Amy Nicole Salvaggio, Service and Sales: The Role of Customer Satisfaction

David E. Bowen, Discussant

Submitted by Benjamin Schneider, ben@psyc.umd.edu

 

125. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 12:001:20 Wentworth

Current State of Total Quality Management: Neither Fad nor Panacea

Comprised of both advocates and critics of TQM, this panel discussion is designed to separate criticisms of TQM as another management fad from the principles of TQM that are theoretically and empirically well-grounded in academic literature. Panelists will share their own experiences and insights regarding the current state and future direction of TQM.

John D. Watt, University of Central Arkansas, Co-Chair

Deidra J. Schleicher, University of Tulsa, Co-Chair

Marshall Sashkin, George Washington University, Panelist

Elizabeth L. Shoenfelt, Western Kentucky University, Panelist

Douglas A. Horne, Institute for Quality Advancement, Panelist

Robert K. Closson, Strategic Marketing Decisions, Panelist

Cynthia J. DeZouche, Navy Environmental Health Center, Panelist

Submitted by John D. Watt, JohnWatt@mail.uca.edu

 

126. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 12:001:20 Kenora

Exporting American I-O Psychology: Lessons From Abroad

Much of the research and practice of I-O psychology is developed in the United States and exported to other countries. This panel brings together five I-O psychologists who were trained in the United States and who have worked abroad. They discuss various challenges and strategies for being successful abroad.

Dirk D. Steiner, Universite de NiceSophia Antipolis, Co-Chair

Beverly A. Dugan, HumRRO, Co-Chair

Beverly A. Dugan, HumRRO, Panelist

Joy Fisher Hazucha, Personnel Decisions International, Panelist

C. Harry Hui, University of Hong Kong, Panelist

Scott E. McIntyre, Instituto Superior da Maia, Panelist

Dirk D. Steiner, Universite de NiceSophia Antipolis, Panelist

Submitted by Dirk D. Steiner, steiner@unice.fr

 

127. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 12:0012:50 Huron

Integrating Career Development, Performance Management, and Compensation: Lessons Learned

Presenters will discuss examples of using competencies to integrate HR processes with business strategy for three organizations. Business needs drove integrated career path planning, performance management, compensation, and other HR processes. Lessons learned will be discussed, and audience members are encouraged to participate.

Catherine Q. Mergen, Buck Consultants, Chair

John E. Furcon, Buck Consultants, Kathryn Kavanagh, Sapient Corporation, Development and Implementation of a Global Career Model

Edwin J. Trouba, Buck Consultants, Applying Competencies to Create a Customer-Focused IT Organization

Catherine Q. Mergen, Buck Consultants, Nick Campagna, BPO Solutions Centre, PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLC, Building and Delivering HR for a Newly Outsourced Business

Submitted by Catherine Q. Mergen, catherine.q.mergen@unifi.com

 

128. Symposium: Saturday, 12:001:20 Kent

Old Dogs, New Tricks:  Traditional Methodologies Applied to Public Policy

Industrial-organizational psychologys methods have increasingly been applied to problems that carry far-reaching implications for revisions of public policy. The symposium presents studies that exemplify this trend in several areas: medical college selection, nursing home evaluation, strategic job analysis at the level of the U.S. economy, and class-action litigation support.

Sigrid B. Gustafson, American Institutes for Research, Chair

Kimberly A. Adams, American Institutes for Research, Cynthia A. Searcy, American Institutes for Research, Lorin M. Mueller, American Institutes for Research, Patricia Etienne, American Association of Medical Colleges, Modeling the Medical Training Process through Critical Incidents

Laura A. Steighner, American Institutes for Research, Nancy Matheson, American Institutes for Research, Joyce D. Mattson, American Institutes for Research, Beverly Cullen, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Karen Schoeneman, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Applying BARS Techniques to Rating Nursing-Home Deficiencies

Lorin M. Mueller, American Institutes for Research, Andrew M. Rose, American Institutes for Research, Sigrid B. Gustafson, American Institutes for Research, Using Job-Analytic Techniques To Assess Occupational Change

Margaret E. Giffin, Giffin Consulting Services, Wayne F. Cascio, University of Colorado, Mary Anne Lahey, American Institutes for Research, Retrospective Job Analyses of Computer Specialists Over 14 Years

Juan I. Sanchez, Florida International University, Discussant

Submitted by Sigrid B. Gustafson, sgustafson@air.org

 

129. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 12:001:20 Civic Ballroom

Cross-Cultural Implications for Instructional Design, Delivery, and Evaluation

An instructional program that is developed for one culture may not be suitable for another. Panelists will consider the practical implications of cultural differences for the instructional process. Specifically, the panel will discuss the implications of cultural differences for designing, delivering, and evaluating instructional programs.

Paula M. Caligiuri, Rutgers University, Chair

Ibraiz Tarique, Rutgers University, Panelist

Herman Aguinis, University of ColoradoDenver, Panelist

Kurt Kraiger, University of ColoradoDenver, Panelist

Submitted by Paula M. Caligiuri, caligiur@rci.rutgers.edu

 

130. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 12:301:50 Grand Centre

Should We Use the Unproctored Internet to Collect Applicant Data?

While most psychologists accept the Internet as a supervised testing medium, some practitioners have embraced the public access Internet to gather information for testing and selection purposes. This session will address concerns and solutions associated with validity, test security, test integrity and cheating, faking and impression management, and candidate perceptions.

David J. Scarborough, Unicru, Inc., Chair

Jurgen Bank, SHL USA Inc., Panelist

David G. Bigby, Bigby, Havis & Associates, Panelist

Charles A. Handler, rocket-hire.com, Panelist

Stephanie R. Klein, ePredix, Inc., Panelist

Nathan J. Mondragon, Development Dimensions International, Panelist

Submitted by David E. Ostberg, Dostberg@unicru.com

 

131. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 12:301:20 Grand East

Its New and Its Used: Applications of O*NET

O*NETs computerized occupational information database has completed initial data-collection efforts and can now go operational in various ways. The first two presentations categorize occupations and link measures to O*NET data for job analysis and validity generalization purposes; the last two deal with O*NETs benefits and applications for career exploration.

Frederick L. Oswald, Michigan State University, Chair

Jeff W. Johnson, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Gary W. Carter, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, David W. Dorsey, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Development of an Occupational Strength Requirement Measure from O*NET Descriptors

Erika DEgidio, Jeanneret & Associates, Inc., Field Applications of O*NET

Patrick D. Converse, Michigan State University, Frederick L. Oswald, Michigan State University, Michael A. Gillespie, Michigan State University, Kevin A. Field, The Ball Foundation, Elizabeth B. Bizot, The Ball Foundation, Beyond Gut Instinct: Exploring Careers Using Aptitudes and O*NET

Sarah Yates Glass, Bigby Havis & Associates, Carol Jenkins, Bigby Havis & Associates, Revolutionizing Career Exploration via O*NET and the Internet

Rodney A. McCloy, HumRRO, Discussant

Submitted by Frederick L. Oswald, foswald@msu.edu

 

132. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 12:301:50 Essex

I-O Psychologys Role in Response to Workplace Trauma

This presentation focuses on contributions I-O psychology can make to address work trauma experienced in the field of law enforcement. Participants represent a broad spectrum of expertise in the field of law enforcement work/family issues and occupational stress. National surveys as well as practical guidelines for organizational assistance are presented.

Robert P. Delprino, SUNY-Buffalo State College, Chair

Robert P. Delprino, SUNY-Buffalo State College, I-O Psychologys Contribution to Addressing Work Place Trauma

Amy Mazzocco, U.S. Department of Justice, Corrections and Law Enforcement Family Support Program: A National Program to Reduce Occupational Stress

Jaan Schaer, Toronto Police Service, EFAP, Cathy Szabo, Toronto Police Service, Working as an Internal Change Agent in Law Enforcement Organizations to Promote a Healthy Organization

Bonita Frazer, Lake Shore Behavioral Health, Inc., Assisting Organizations in Restoring a Productive Workplace After a Traumatic Event

Mark C. Healy, 3-D Group, Strategies for Gaining Access into Law Enforcement Organizations as an External Consultant

Submitted by Robert P. Delprino, delprirp@buffalostate.edu

 

133. Symposium: Saturday, 12:302:20 Windsor

Selection for Teams: A Tale of Five Approaches

Although work is commonly organized around teams, there is relatively little empirical research on how to select individuals in team-based settings. This symposium presents research on how to select individuals for these settings. The presenters discuss evidence on situational judgment tests, personality tests, biodata tests, structured interviews, and ability tests.

Frederick P. Morgeson, Michigan State University, Chair

Michael J. Stevens, University of Missouri-St Louis, Whats Past is Prologue: Exploring a Biodata Approach to Team Selection

Frederick P. Morgeson, Michigan State University, Matthew H. Reider, Purdue University, Michael A. Campion, Purdue University, Selecting Individuals in Team Settings: Comparing a Structured Interview, Personality Test, and Teamwork Ability Test

Greg L. Stewart, Brigham Young University, Murray R. Barrick, University of Iowa, Examining TraitGoal Interactions and Performance in a Team Setting

Troy V. Mumford, Purdue University, Team-Role Knowledge and its Relationship with Team-Role Performance

John D. Arnold, Aon Consulting, Discussant

Richard J. Klimoski, George Mason University, Discussant

Submitted by Frederick P. Morgeson, morgeson@msu.edu

 

134. Symposium: Saturday, 12:301:50 Elgin

New Directions in Research on Motivational Traits

This symposium is a collection of studies that examine approaches to assessing the dispositional basis of work motivation. Recent theory and empirical work in the areas of goal orientation, motivational traits, and action-state orientation are presented, with an emphasis on understanding the unique contributions of each.

James M. Diefendorff, Louisiana State University, Chair

Aaron M. Schmidt, Michigan State University, J. Kevin Ford, Michigan State University, The Role of Goal Orientations on Metacognitive Activity and Learning Outcomes

Ruth Kanfer, Georgia Institute of Technology, Phillip L. Ackerman, Georgia Institute of Technology, Cognitive and Non-Ability Influences on Volition During Skill Training

Robert R. Hirschfeld, University of Georgia, Lucinda Lawson, Lehigh University, Differential Predictive Validity of General Propensities Encompassing Approach Motivation

James M. Diefendorff, Louisiana State University, Robin H. Gosserand, Louisiana State University, Rosalie J. Hall, University of Akron, Chu-Hsiang Chang, University of Akron, Distinguishing Action-State Orientation from Other Motivational and Self-Regulatory Traits

Eric D. Heggestad, Colorado State University, Discussant

Submitted by James M. Diefendorff, jdiefen@lsu.edu

 

135. Roundtable: Saturday, 12:301:50 Simcoe/Dufferin

Back to Square One: Lessons that Graduate School Left Out

The early career of a practitioner is filled with lessons that are not taught during graduate training. This roundtable will provide the opportunity for participants to converse about the issues facing new professionals. Audience members are encouraged to use this opportunity to network and discuss their own concerns and experiences.

Greg A. Barnett, Hogan Assessment Systems, Co-Host

Lisa Mills, U.S. Army Research Institute, Co-Host

Lee Welton Croll, RHR International, Co-Host

Michael Najar, United Airlines, Co-Host

Ryan A. Ross, Hogan Assessment Systems, Co-Host

Submitted by Greg A. Barnett, drpanker@home.com

 

136. Special Event: Saturday, 1:002:50 Conference B/C

Frontiers Series Invited Symposium:  The Dark Side of Organizational Behavior

An increasing array of employee behaviors has attracted attention among organizational scholars. While some of these are functional in nature, others relate to negative consequences. Collectively, this emerging set of constructs might be called the dark side of organizational behavior. Ricky Griffin and Anne OLeary-Kelly have contracted to develop a book as part of the SIOP Frontiers Series, addressing various dark side variables and constructs. The symposium will include representative presentations by four author teams whose work will appear in the book.

Ricky W. Griffin, Texas A&M University, Co-Chair

Anne M. OLeary-Kelly, University of Arkansas, Co-Chair

Robert D. Pritchard, Texas A&M University, Co-Chair

Robert D. Pritchard, Texas A&M University, Discussion of the Frontiers Series and the Emergence of the Dark Side Book

Ricky W. Griffin, Texas A&M University, Introduction and Overview of The Dark Side of Organizational Behavior

Joel H. Neuman, SUNYNew Paltz, The Interactive Effects of Injustice, Stress, and Workplace Aggression

K. Michele Kacmar, Florida State University, Extreme Careerism: The Dark Side of Impression Management

Virginia K. Bratton, Florida State University, Elizabeth Deitch, Tulane University, Out of the Closet and Out of a Job? The Nature, Import and Causes of Sexual Orientation Discrimination in the Workplace

Rebecca Butz, Tulane University, Arthur P. Brief, Tulane University, Robert L. Dipboye, Rice University, Illegal and Unfair Discrimination in Organizations

Anne M. OLeary-Kelly, University of Arkansas, Discussant

 

137. Symposium: Saturday, 1:002:20 Conference D/E

Goal-Perception Discrepancy Production: Current Practical and Theoretical Issues

Goal-perception discrepancy production is the quintessential dynamic goal-striving process. In this symposium, four papers are presented that explore current theoretical and practical issues in discrepancy production via change in goal levels. In particular, the antecedents to discrepancy production and the goal-striving processes that may account for discrepancy production are explored.

Jeffrey B. Vancouver, The Ohio University, Chair

Charles A. Scherbaum, The Ohio University, Jeffrey B. Vancouver, The Ohio University, Testing a Computational Goal-Discrepancy Reducing Model of Discrepancy Production

John J. Donovan, Virginia Tech, Antecedents of Discrepancy Production in an Achievement Setting

David J. Radosevich, The Ohio State University, Vandana Vaidyanathan, The Ohio State University, Motivational Mechanisms Involved in Discrepancy Production Over Time

Kyle E. Brink, University of Georgia, Self-Efficacy and Goal Change in the Absence of External Feedback

Kevin J. Williams, University at AlbanySUNY, Discussant

Submitted by Jeffrey B. Vancouver, vancouve@ohio.edu

 

138. Special Event: Saturday, 1:002:50 Dominion North

The Wake of Disaster: Impact on the Nations Workplace

The indelible impact of September 11 has rippled through the U.S. economyeconomic and other issues continue to be felt. Results will be presented from a national study conducted in October 2001. Sent to 10,000 workers, the survey addressed changes in the workplace: how much, in what way, how permanent.

Scott M. Brooks, Gantz Wiley Research, Chair

Jack W. Wiley, Gantz Wiley Research, Presenter

Emily L. Hause, Augsburg College, Presenter

 

139. Symposium: Saturday, 1:002:50 Dominion South

Stereotype Threat in Testing Contexts: A Critical Examination

Stereotype threat has been proposed as an explanation for racial subgroup differences on cognitive ability tests. The presentations in this symposium take a critical look at stereotype threat research, with a particular emphasis on how it applies to employment contexts. These papers identify several difficulties with applying stereotype threat research.

Robert E. Ployhart, George Mason University, Chair

Lynn A. McFarland, George Mason University, Dalit Lev-Arey Margalit, George Mason University, Jonathan C. Ziegert, University of Maryland, Stereotype Threat: Generalizability to a Motivational Context

Hannah-Hanh Dung Nguyen, Michigan State University, Alisha ONeal, Michigan State University, Ann Marie Ryan, Michigan State University, Stereotype Threat Effects on Cognitive Ability Performance in Applicant Settings

David Mayer, University of Maryland, Paul J. Hanges, University of Maryland, What Underlies Stereotype Threat? An Examination of Potential Mediators

Jonathan C Ziegert, University of Maryland, Robert E. Ployhart, George Mason University, Lynn A. McFarland, George Mason University, Perceived Stereotype Threat: Development of a Self-Report Scale

Michael J. Cullen, University of Minnesota, Chaitra M. Hardison, University of Minnesota, Zach Lippe, University of Minnesota, Depictions of Stereotype Threat in the Popular and Scientific Media

Paul R. Sackett, University of Minnesota, Discussant

Submitted by Robert E. Ployhart, rployhar@gmu.edu

 

140. Symposium: Saturday, 1:002:20 Huron

Do Common Recruitment Strategies Effectively Increase Organizational Workforce Diversity

Companies struggle to enhance their workforce diversity. Recruitment strategies are critical in this process. Current research illuminates the effectiveness of common strategies intended to attract a diverse applicant pool. We focus specifically on job advertisements and brochures as recruitment tools and evaluate applicant responses based on gender and race.

Lesley A. Perkins, Caliber Associates, Co-Chair

Joan M. Ratz, Minnesota State UniversityMankato, Co-Chair

Lesley A. Perkins, Caliber Associates, Kecia M. Thomas, University of Georgia, The Spillover Effects of Demography on Organizational Efforts to Recruit

Debra J. Drenth, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Walter C. Borman, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Diversity and Recruitment: A Policy-Capturing Approach

Joan M. Ratz, Minnesota State UniversityMankato, Sara K. Farrell, Minnesota State UniversityMankato, Andy Dybvig, Minnesota State UniversityMankato, Perceived Fairness of and Attraction to an Organization Based on Diversity Policy and Job Gender Stereotype

Talya N. Bauer, Portland State University, Discussant

Submitted by Joan M. Ratz, jratz@lamar.colostate.edu

 

141. Poster Session: Saturday, 1:002:20 Sheraton Hall

Motivation and Performance Management

141-1 The Frame-of-Reference Training Protocol: All Feedback is Not Created Equal

Previous frame-of-reference training (FOR) research has not examined the training protocol used in FOR training. Focusing upon the feedback component of the protocol, we examined the implications of performance theory complexity for determining the optimal protocol. We found that complexity matters when designing an optimal training protocol.

Lorne M. Sulsky, University of Calgary

Krista L. Uggerslev, University of Calgary

David V. Day, Pennsylvania State University

Janine Keown, University of Calgary

Submitted by Krista L. Uggerslev, kuggersl@ucalgary.ca 

141-2 Assessing Three Measures of Free-Set Goal Difficulty

Free-set goals (FSGs) are defined by goal setters themselves; therefore, goal difficulty and content freely vary. We assessed the validity of coding FSG difficulty against findings generated in previous goal studies. Comparing three ways to operationalize FSG difficulty, external assessments of difficulty predicted performance better than the goal-setters self-assessed goal difficulty.

Thomas D. Kane, Southwest Missouri State University

Janet E. Loughran, Southwest Missouri State University

Carol F. Shoptaugh, Southwest Missouri State University

Audra Nelson, South Dakota Bureau of Personnel

Rebecca J. Reichard, Florida International University

Submitted by Thomas D. Kane, tdk464F@smsu.edu 

141-3 Effects of Compelling Personal Vision on Hierarchical Goal Structures

We examined extreme distal goals of personal goal hierarchies (i.e., personal vision). Students who described their personal visions set higher quality goals than controls. Mixed results were found for students who portrayed optimistic personal visions rather than their likely future. Results support logically connected, yet malleable, goal hierarchies.

Aline Delgado Masuda, Southwest Missouri State University

Katherine Ford Minor, Southwest Missouri State University

Carol F. Shoptaugh, Southwest Missouri State University

Thomas D. Kane, Southwest Missouri State University

Submitted by Carol F. Shoptaugh, cfs280f@smsu.edu 

141-4 Learning Goal Orientation, Self-Efficacy, and Goal Level: A Multispecificity Perspective

Relationships between learning goal orientation and self-efficacy were examined in relation to self-set goals at two specificity levels. The proximal operationalizations of these constructs mediated the effects of distal operationalizations and interacted to affect goals. The nature of the mediation between these two constructs differed for congruent and incongruent operationalizations.

Stephen B. Jeong, The Ohio State University

Howard J. Klein, The Ohio State University

Submitted by Stephen B. Jeong, Jeong.36@osu.edu 

141-5 Gender Stereotypes and Performance Evaluation: The Impact of Individual-Difference Measures

This study examined whether individual difference measures moderate the relationship between gender-stereotypes (traditional/nontraditional) and the accuracy of performance evaluations of women. Results indicated that the relationship between stereotype and rating accuracy was strongest for individuals who were high in need for closure and low self-monitors.

Cara C. Bauer, Wayne State University

Lindsey M. Young, Wayne State University

Boris B. Baltes, Wayne State University 

Submitted by Cara C. Bauer, carab20@aol.com 

141-6 Multisource Feedback Practices That Enhance Organizational Outcomes

A survey was administered to senior human resource executives in 42 global organizations to assess the extent to which various multisource feedback (MSF) practices were employed and the outcomes of those practices. Specific practices were found to be significantly related to the benefits derived from MSF.

Evelyn E. Rogers, E. Rogers Associates, Inc.

Michael T. Barriere, Hofstra University

Ira T. Kaplan, Hofstra University

William Metlay, Hofstra University

Submitted by Michael T. Barriere, psymtb@hofstra.edu 

141-7 How Equity Sensitivity Affects Attitudes and Behaviors

The purpose of this study was to determine how equity sensitivity influences attitudes and behaviors. Equity sensitivity did not affect perceptions of distributive justice. It also did not have reliable interactive effects with distributive justice to explain reactions. Additive effects were found. Potential explanations for the results are discussed.

William C. Roedder, The University of Tennessee

Michael C. Rush, The University of Tennessee

Robert T. Ladd, The University of Tennessee

Dave Schumann, The University of Tennessee

David J. Woehr, The University of Tennessee

Submitted by William C. Roedder, chadroedder@hotmail.com 

141-8 Practitioners Rate Performance Appraisal Uses and Barriers

In an effort to understand why widespread dissatisfaction exists about the performance appraisal process, practitioners perceptions were solicited. Seventy-four (74) managers indicated that employee feedback and development was the most effective use of performance appraisal, while a lack of training on how to give performance feedback was the most significant barrier.

Patricia C. Browne, George Mason University

Stephanie C. Payne, Texas A&M University

Submitted by Stephanie C. Payne, scp@psyc.tamu.edu 

141-9 SelfOther Agreement on a 360-Degree Leadership

The current study investigates the relationship between Air Force promotion rate and self-supervisor (n = 825), self-peer (n = 285), and self-subordinate (n = 256) agreement on a leadership scale. Results indicate that self-subordinate agreement a better predictor of promotion rate than self-superior or self-peer agreement. Analyses were completed using Polynomial Regressions Equations (Edwards, 1993; 1994).

Stefanie K. Halverson, Rice University

Scott Tonidandel, Rice University

Cassie B. Barlow, U.S. Air Force

Robert L. Dipboye, Rice University

Submitted by Stefanie K. Halverson, skh@rice.edu 

141-10 Differences in Self- and Superior-Ratings of Performance: Personality Provides Clues

Self-superior differences in performance ratings were studied in relation to ratees personality trait scores using 204 managers in a financial services organization. It was found that inflation of self-ratings of performance relative to superior ratings was associated with high achievement, high desirability, low anxiety, and high social confidence (self-esteem).

Richard D. Goffin, University of Western Ontario

David W. Anderson, Bank of Nova Scotia

Submitted by Richard D. Goffin, goffin@uwo.ca 

141-11 Position Management: A Broader Definition of Performance Appraisal System Effectiveness

Performance appraisal systems are generally conceptualized as methods for managing individual behavior through administrative and developmental actions. In this paper we extend this view by examining PA as a method for position (versus incumbent) management. Evidence from a survey of incumbents and managers supports this view. Various criteria were predicted.

Satoris S. Youngcourt, Southwest Missouri State University

Robert G. Jones, Southwest Missouri State University

Submitted by Robert G. Jones, RobertJones@smsu.edu 

141-12 Does Discussing Multisource Feedback With Raters Enhance Performance Improvement?

Ratees (5,335) who discussed their multisource feedback with supervisors improved more than others (1 year later) based on supervisor ratings. Among ratees who received unfavorable feedback from direct reports or peers, those who discussed the feedback with those raters improved more than others based on direct report and peer ratings.

James W. Smither, La Salle University

Manuel London, SUNYStony Brook

Raymond Flautt, JP Morgan Chase

Yvette Vargas, JP Morgan Chase

Ivy Kucine, JP Morgan Chase

Submitted by James W. Smither, amysean@aol.com 

141-13 Personality and Leaders Reactions to and Use of Multisource Feedback

Among military leaders, agreeableness was related to multisource ratings, neuroticism was related to openness to feedback, and responsibility was related to accountability to use the feedback. Six months later, leaders high in extraversion had sought more feedback, and leaders high in responsibility had engaged in more developmental behaviors.

James W. Smither, La Salle University

Manuel London, SUNYStony Brook

Kristin Roukema Richmond, United States Military

Submitted by James W. Smither, amysean@aol.com 

141-14 Group Performance Appraisal: Increasing Rating Accuracy

This study explores the role of group discussion and consensus in determining the accuracy of performance ratings. Results suggest that even though members in groups requiring discussion significantly increased their accuracy (elevation and differential elevation) after discussion, requiring a consensus rating can result in the most accurate ratings (differential elevation).

Sylvia G. Roch, University at AlbanySUNY

Submitted by Sylvia G. Roch, roch@csc.albany.edu 

141-15 Situational Goal Orientation:  Enhancing Our Understanding of the Goal-Setting Process

The present study examined the role of situational goal orientation in the establishment of self-set goals. In addition, the possibility of self-efficacy as a mediator in this relationship was also a focus of interest. The results suggest the value of assessing the dynamic process of self-regulation with more context-specific variables.

B. Tyson Breland, Virginia Tech

John J. Donovan, Virginia Tech

Submitted by B. Tyson Breland, bbreland@vt.edu 

141-16 The Effect of Implicit Beliefs on Performance Appraisal Ratings

Two studies investigated how managers implicit theories of personality influence their responsiveness to disconfirmatory behavioral evidence. Holding an incremental theory (i.e., believing that personality changes) was positively related to managers (a) recognition of a videotaped performance improvement (n = 82), and (b) providing lower appraisal ratings after a decline in performance (n = 43).

Peter A. Heslin, University of Toronto

Submitted by Peter A. Heslin, heslin@rotman.utoronto.ca

141-17 Factors Underlying the Selection of Raters in Multisource Assessment

This study investigates the role that organizational-based self-esteem (OBSE) and the purpose (administrative or developmental) of the multisource assessment (MSA) may play in the selection of raters. The results of the study suggest that ratees use different strategies when selecting raters.

Sandra Petosa, Societe Pierre Boucher

Stephane Brutus, Concordia University

Submitted by Stephane Brutus, brutus@vax2.concordia.ca 

141-18 Goal Orientation and Employee Satisfaction with the Performance Appraisal System

Employees with higher levels of learning-goal orientations indicated higher levels of performance-appraisal satisfaction along with higher performance-appraisal ratings. They also reported greater levels of participation of all types in the performance review. Participation partially mediated the relationship between learning-goal orientation and performance-appraisal satisfaction.

Joseph M. Ralston, Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville

Lynn K. Bartels, Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville

Cynthia R. Nordstrom, Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville

Submitted by Lynn K. Bartels, LBartel@siue.edu 

141-19 The Dynamics of State Goal Orientations

The current study examined the dynamic nature of state goal orientations over time, specifically, in response to positive or negative performance feedback. We propose and test a process model whereby individuals state goal orientations change over time as a function of performance feedback, performance evaluations, and self-efficacy.

Brad A. Chambers, Michigan State University

Richard P. DeShon, Michigan State University

Submitted by Brad A. Chambers, chamb130@msu.edu 

141-20 Feelings About Feedback:  Predicting Affective Reactions From Work Goal Orientation

This study investigated work goal orientation and positive affect following feedback with 115 employees. A learning goal orientation predicted positive affect after self-feedback, and a prove goal orientation predicted positive affect after other-feedback. An avoid goal orientation predicted positive affect after negative self-feedback. Implications of the results are discussed.

Lorayne Botwood, Macquarie University

Submitted by Lorayne Botwood, lbotwood@psy.mq.edu.au 

141-21 An Organizational Justice Explanation of Feedback Reactions in LMX Relationships

In a field setting, organizational justice was examined as a mediator between leader-member-exchange (LMX) quality and feedback reactions. Satisfaction, utility, motivation to improve, and accuracy were influenced by voice and justification being present during the appraisal discussion. Satisfaction and accuracy were also influenced by distributive, procedural, and interactional justice.

Joelle D. Elicker, University of Akron

Paul E. Levy, University of Akron

Rosalie J. Hall, University of Akron

Submitted by Paul E. Levy, plevy@uakron.edu 

141-22 Self-Ratings and Reactions: Asking for Input Isnt Always Enough

Boundary conditions associated with the positive effects of self-ratings were investigated. Results indicated that when the expectation that self-ratings would be considered was violated, reactions were less favorable than when self-ratings were not utilized at all. However, providing an explanation for the violation attenuated the negative effects of this violation.

Lisa M. Keeping, Wilfrid Laurier University

Paul E. Levy, University of Akron

Submitted by Lisa M. Keeping, lkeeping@wlu.ca 

141-23 The Feedback Environment and Work Outcome Variables

The relationship between the feedback environment (Steelman, Levy, & Snell, 2001) and work-outcome variables was examined through the mediating effects of affective commitment. Results indicate that affective commitment mediates the relationship between the feedback environment, OCBs, and absences. Conclusions and implications are discussed.

Christina Norris-Watts, University of Akron

Paul E. Levy, University of Akron

Submitted by Paul E. Levy, plevy@uakron.edu 

141-24 BARS and Those Mysterious, Missing Middle Anchors

Although behaviorally anchored rating scales (BARS) are used in many domains, little has changed since their inception in terms of developing BARS. The current study identifies why it is difficult to anchor behaviors in the middle of BARS and proposes a new scaling process to overcome this problem.

Neil M. A. Hauenstein, Virginia Tech

Reagan D. Brown, Western Kentucky University

Andrea L. Sinclair, Virginia Tech

Submitted by Neil M. A. Hauenstein, nhauen@vt.edu 

141-25 A Closer Look at Cronbachs Accuracy Components as Dependent Variables

This paper reviews and summarizes the criticisms surrounding the use of congruence indices as dependent variables with a particular focus on the use of Cronbachs (1955) accuracy components in performance-rating research. Recommendations are provided for an alternative analysis that supplements and improves upon the traditional Cronbach accuracy components.

Andrea L. Sinclair, Virginia Tech

Neil M. A. Hauenstein, Virginia Tech

Submitted by Andrea L. Sinclair, asinclair@vt.edu 

141-26 Personality and Training Proficiency:  Issues of Bandwidth-Fidelity, Validity, and Curvilinearity

This study found that narrow trait measures of conscientiousness (dependability and initiative) and emotional stability (stress-tolerance and self-control) predicted training performance more effectively than aggregated measures. Specifically, significant linear and quadratic terms were found for the dependability, but not initiative. Only the quadratic term for stress tolerance was significant.

Nicholas L. Vasilopoulos, George Washington University

Jeffrey M. Cucina, George Washington University

Rebecca Goldenberg, George Washington University

Paul D. Usala, U.S. Immigration & Naturalization Service

Submitted by Nicholas L. Vasilopoulos, nlv@gwu.edu 

141-27 NBADSA Conceptually New Rating Scale Format

Subjective rating scales suffer various biases (e.g. halo, leniency). A new continuous format, using normative distributional background to assist raters, was built and tested using several rater groups. Results show this user-friendly scale to have less leniency bias and higher accuracy and inter-rater agreement than a GRS and a BARS formats.

Eran Hollander, Virginia Tech

Robert J. Harvey, Virginia Tech

Submitted by Eran Hollander, eholland@vt.edu 

141-28 Understanding Self-Regulatory Responses to Performance Feedback

Consistent with feedback and self-regulation theories, we predicted that feedback would cue individuals attention to either task- or self-related goals, thereby affecting performance. Results indicated that, although performance was unaffected, feedback influenced attention, but only for individuals with low self-esteem. Conclusions and future directions for feedback research are discussed.

Adam Barsky, Tulane University

Ronald S. Landis, Tulane University

Submitted by Adam Barsky, abarsky@tulane.edu 

141-29 Training Nontraditional Rating Sources for Improved Interrater Agreement and Accuracy

Previous studies in 360-degree feedback have indicated that nontraditional raters tend to be low in interrater reliability, agreement, and accuracy. Accordingly, the present study examined the effectiveness of two agreement and accuracy enhancers, behaviorally oriented survey design and frame-of-reference training (FOR; Woehr, 1994). Data collected from 120 undergraduate students indicated that an abbreviated form of FOR training might be useful in customer rating situations.

Lisle S. Hites, Tulane University

Ronald S. Landis, Tulane University

Submitted by Lisle S. Hites, lhites@tulane.edu 

141-30 The Influence of Implicit Theories on Performance Attributions and Expectancies

This study examines the influence of implicit theories of ability on performance attributions and expectations across trials. Results indicated that an entity view was positively related to ability attributions following initial performance. Results also demonstrated that across trials, entity theorists based future expectations for performance on their most recent performance.

Tonya L. Dodge, University at AlbanySUNY

Kevin J. Williams, University at AlbanySUNY

Submitted by Kevin J. Williams, kevinw@csc.albany.edu 

141-31 Implicit Theories of Ability and Performance Appraisal Processes

This study extends the implicit theories of ability literature to appraisals of others performance. Implicit theory of ability was hypothesized to predict the amount of information sought to assess others performance. Although results failed to indicate the proposed effect, several explanations are offered and avenues for future research are discussed.

Greg Robinson, University at Albany,SUNY

Kevin J. Williams, University at AlbanySUNY

Submitted by Greg Robinson, gotribe@francomm.com 

141-32 Developmental Assessment Centers: Who Wants Feedback?

This study examined 189 newly hired supervisors in the transportation industry who completed a developmental assessment center. The results showed that those who performed poorly in the assessment center, particularly on interpersonal dimensions, were less likely to initiate a scheduled feedback telephone call. Implications and future research ideas are discussed.

Joseph D. Abraham, Organization Improvement Consulting

Dawn D. Burnett, University of Tulsa

John D. Morrison, Self-Employed

Submitted by Dawn D. Burnett, dawn-burnett@utulsa.edu 

141-33 Interrater Agreement in Judging Managerial Performance:  Effects of Competency Importance

Interrater agreement in multisource appraisal has been reported to be modest within- and between-rater groups. In an effort to better understand the performancejudgment process, we asked whether agreement is higher on more important managerial competencies. Results confirmed prior findings and suggested the role of competency importance is complex.

Robert P. Tett, University of Tulsa

Dawn D. Burnett, University of Tulsa

Dalibor K. Heger, University of Tulsa

Matt McCord, University of Tulsa

Submitted by Dawn D. Burnett, dawn-burnett@utulsa.edu 

141-34 Literature Review of Acceptable or Just Noticeably Different Pay Increases 

We summarized empirical evidence relevant to setting appropriately sized or just noticeably different (JND) pay increases. We conducted a comprehensive literature search for JND estimates. Based on the search, we calculated an estimate of about 6.0% to 8.5% of current salary level. Several methodological concerns and research recommendations are discussed.

David A. Katkowski, HumRRO

Gina J. Medsker, HumRRO

Kenneth Pritchard, Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority

Submitted by David A. Katkowski, dkatkowski@Humrro.org 

141-35 Predicting Executive Performance with Multirater Surveys:  Who You Ask Matters

Using a 360 feedback approach, we examined the extent that ratings obtained from different rating sources (self, manager, peers, direct reports) correlated with executives job performance. Results revealed that competency feedback obtained from direct reports was the most valid predictor of performance. Implications for developmental and administrative decision making are discussed.

Fabio Sala, Hay/McBer

Stephen A. Dwight, Sepracor

Submitted by Fabio Sala, fabio_sala@haygroup.com 

141-36 Self-Efficacy Domain Relatedness and Intra-Role Criterion Specificity

Based on longitudinal field data analyzed by SEM, we show that domain-specific self-efficacy positively predicts the conceptually related domain, but negatively predicts the conceptually distinct performance domain. These findings imply that the use of a single specific self-efficacy measure for prediction of complex work roles can lead to misleading conclusions.

Alex Stajkovic, University of WisconsinMadison

Submitted by Alex Stajkovic, astajkovic@bus.wisc.edu 

141-37 Predicting Sources of Self-Efficacy Using Goal Orientation

This study examined the association between sources of self-efficacy and goal orientation. The findings indicate that individuals with different goal orientations seek out and attend to different sources of information to determine their overall self-efficacy beliefs. These results explain and extend previous research linking goal orientation and self-efficacy.

Maryalice Citera, SUNYNew Paltz

Jennifer Combs, SUNYNew Paltz

Submitted by Maryalice Citera, citeram@newpaltz.edu 

141-38 Self-Efficacy Interventions in Businesses:  The Boundaries of the Galatea Effect 

We tested several boundary conditions of the Galatea effect including using nonfictitious psychological self-efficacy interventions with established adult professionals involved in on-the-job work activities within a business organization. Effects on performance were somewhat short-lived (1 month), but longer for other variables. In addition, we tested the self-fulfilling prophecy-at-work model.

D. Brian McNatt, University of Georgia

Timothy A. Judge, University of Florida

Submitted by D. Brian McNatt, bmcnatt@terry.uga.edu 

141-39 Flanagan Award Winner: Individual Differences in Leadership Emergence

This paper investigates the extent to which dispositional influences on leadership emergence have genetic causes. Results indicated that 35% of the variance in the latent construct of leadership emergence is due to genetic effects mediated by intelligence and the Big Five personality traits.

Remus Ilies, University of Florida

Timothy A. Judge, University of Florida

Megan Werner, University of Iowa

Submitted by Remus Ilies, iliesr@ufl.edu 

141-40 Test of a Path Model for Contextual Antecedents of Accountability

A lack of research in the accountability arena is compounded by the suggestions that the developmental nature of feedback systems lowers accountability within the system. The path model analyzed in this study examines the contextual variables (LMX and feedback environment) and their effects on accountability and self-development initiative.

Kelly Rutkowski, Florida Institute of Technology

Lisa A. Steelman, Florida Institute of Technology

Submitted by Kelly Rutkowski, kelrutkowsk@aol.com 

141-41 Meta-Analysis and Test for Partial Mediation Involving Goal Commitment

The purposes of this study were to (a) identify the precise nature of the goal commitmenttask performance relationship for assigned goals, (b) identify the relationship between goal commitment and assigned goal difficulty, and (c) test goal commitment as a partial mediator of the assigned goal difficultytask performance relationship.

Eric J. Barger, George Mason University

Tara D. Carpenter, George Mason University

Submitted by Eric J. Barger, eric11@mindspring.com 

141-42 Incremental Contribution of Trait Goal Orientation in Explaining Performance Variability

This study examines whether assessments of individuals goal orientation dispositions provide incremental contributions to understanding variance in performance over and above that offered by general mental ability and conscientiousness. Results indicate that trait learning and performance goal orientations do not meaningfully improve prediction (i.e., D MR = .007).

Arlise P. McKinney, Virginia Tech

Kevin D. Carlson, Virginia Tech

Submitted by Arlise P. McKinney, amckinne@vt.edu 

141-43 360-Feedback Evaluation and Turnover: Is There a Relationship?

This study looks at 360-feedback scores for employees who left a company compared to those who remained. Results indicate significant differences between the groups on managerial and some direct-report scores and the discrepancy between self- and manager scores.

Roni Reiter-Palmon, University of NebraskaOmaha

Elizabeth M. Haley, University of NebraskaOmaha

Submitted by Roni Reiter-Palmon, rreiter-palmon@mail.unomaha.edu 

141-44 Effects of Grouped Appraisal Feedback on High Performers

The effect of grouped versus distinctive feedback on high-performing employees was investigated. Feedback that shows a distinction between the performances of employees led to better subsequent performance by the previous top-performing employee. A significant interaction showed feedback to have a large effect on performance under equal pay conditions.

Jim Matchen, University of MissouriSt. Louis

James A. Breaugh, University of MissouriSt Louis

Submitted by Jim Matchen, s049507@admiral.umsl.edu 

141-45 Measurement Equivalence of Executives Performance:  Does Direct Report Gender Matter?

The present study examined the measurement equivalence of executives performance ratings when rated by men and women direct reports. Confirmatory factor analysis showed gender equivalence of ratings for both men and women executives.

Jason M. Etchegaray, University of Houston

Barbara B. Ellis, University of Houston

Maynard Goff, Personnel Decisions International

Submitted by Jason M. Etchegaray, JasonEtchegaray@yahoo.com 

141-46 SelfOther Rating Agreement in Multisource Feedback:  Antecedents and Correlates

The relationships between selfother rating agreement, proposed antecedents (analytic ability, self-acceptance, dominance, and flexibility), and correlates (leadership and judgment) were examined. Results supported hypotheses of analytic ability, dominance, and flexibility predicting self-rating overestimation. Limitations and implications of findings are discussed.

Elizabeth M. Smith, University of TennesseeKnoxville

Katie Helland, University of TennesseeKnoxville

Submitted by Elizabeth M. Smith, esmith2@utk.edu 

 

142. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 1:302:20 Grand West

Current Issues in Employee Survey Research

Leading experts from academia, consulting, and industry discuss a variety of topics likely to confront anyone conducting an employee opinion survey. Topics will come from the audience and include things such as sampling versus census methodologies, technology-based data collection methods, and the keys to using results to actually create change.

Roger E. Lipson, Kenexa, Chair

Allan H. Church, PepsiCo, Panelist

David W. Bracken, Mercer Delta, Panelist

Allen I. Kraut, Baruch College/Kraut Associates, Panelist

Submitted by Roger Lipson, roger.lipson@kenexa.com 

 

143. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 1:302:50 Grand East

Merger of Equals: Implications for the I-O Practitioner

Realizing the full value of a merger of equals requires carefully planned and exceptionally executed efforts. This forum presents the contribution of five I-O practitioners in combining two large financial institutions. Topics to be discussed include merger due diligence, culture integration, selection and placement, integration metrics, and key talent retention.

Amy R. Carver, Wachovia Corporation, Co-Chair

Thomas J. Braun, Wachovia Corporation, Co-Chair

Amy R. Carver, Wachovia Corporation, The I-O Practitioners Involvement in Due Diligence

Rhonda McGown, Wachovia Corporation, Cultural Assessment and Integration in Two Merging Financial Services Organizations

Carol M. Oeth, Wachovia Corporation, Bob Brotherton, Wachovia Corporation, Selection and Placement in a Merger of Equals

Thomas J. Braun, Wachovia Corporation, Merger Integration Metrics: Tracking the Success of the Marriage

Thomas Rauzi, Wachovia Corporation, Balancing Talent Retention and Merger Integration Strategies

Submitted by Thomas J. Braun, tjbraun@peoplepc.com

 

144. Symposium: Saturday, 1:302:50 Conference F

Perceived Organizational Support: New Directions

We describe new research directions concerning perceived organizational support (POS). Two papers use structural equation modeling to examine how favorable treatment acts via POS to influence employee attitudes and behavior. The remaining two papers concern the influence of basic employment conditions and dispositional differences in employee motivation on POS.

Robert Eisenberger, University of Delaware, Chair

Kathryn M. Bartol, University of Maryland, Wei Liu, University of Maryland, Ian O. Williamson, University of Maryland, Viswaneth Venkatesh, University of Maryland, Antecedents and Outcomes of Perceived Organizational Support: Examination of a Mediating Model

Florence Stinglhamber, Catholic University of Louvain, Christian Vandenberghe, Catholic University of Louvain, Antecedents and Consequences of Perceived Support: A Longitudinal Investigation

Anika Gakovic, University of Houston, Lois E. Tetrick, University of Houston, Perceived Organizational Support and Types of Work Agreements: A Comparison of Part-time and Full-time Employees Employment

Robert Eisenberger, University of Delaware, Florence Stinglhamber, Catholic University of Louvain, Linda Rhoades, University of Delaware, Fairness and Perceived Organizational Support: Contributions of Collectivism and Competitiveness

Lynn M. Shore, Georgia State University, Discussant

Submitted by Robert Eisenberger, eisenber@udel.edu

 

145. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 1:302:50 Conference G

Executive/Leadership Education: New Models, New Challenges

Increasingly, Wall Street sees management as a key element of a companys future prospects. Consequently, leading companies are reexamining how they develop current and future leaders. This panel will address critical recent developments in Executive/Leadership Education as well as some implications and challenges. Panelists represent a range of differing perspectives.

John K. Kennedy, The EmpowerGroup, Ltd., Chair

Anna Marie Valerio, IBM, Panelist

Susan N. Palmer, University of North Carolina, Panelist

Melodie Jancerak, Center for Creative Leadership, Panelist

Leigh A. Hodges, The Empower Group, Ltd., Panelist

Submitted by John K. Kennedy, jackkennedy@empowergrp.com

 

146. Master Tutorial: Saturday, 1:302:20 Cinema 2

One CE Credit Available for Attending! Register at the Session.

Why Do People Become Outplaced?

This paper identifies links between personal constructs and outplacement. Implications for selection, career counseling and training are highlighted. Psychometric data is analysed to correlate experience of outplacement, personality, and job-search success. Staff are compared using psychometric data to identify differences which contribute to the likelihood and experience of outplacment.

Colin Selby, Selby MillSmith, Ltd, Presenter

Submitted by Colin Selby, colin.selby@virgin.net

 

147. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 1:302:50 Wentworth

EOS Follow-up Strategies to Impact Change: Pitfalls and Best Practices

EOS programs are used to initiate change within organizations. Action planning initiatives can originate within top management, individual workgroups, or a mixed approach. This panel discussion brings together practitioners from leading organizations to describe experiences with various follow-up strategies and point out pitfalls and best practices leading to successful change.

Van M. Latham, PathPoint Consulting, Chair

Tobin V. Anselmi, Dell Computer Corporation, Panelist

John Bachellor, Bank of America, Panelist

Joan Gutkowski, MTV Networks, Panelist

Seth Kamen, CVS, Panelist

Jennifer Mattocks, Questar, Panelist

Submitted by Van M. Latham, Vlatham@pathpointconsulting.com

 

148. Symposium: Saturday, 1:302:50 Kenora

News from the Dark Side: The Next Decades Counterproductivity Research

The past decade brought expanding definitions and understanding of employee counterproductivity, but what will the next decade bring? We provide an overview of the evolving counterproductivity construct and then present empirical studies of new manifestations of counterproductivity, including identity theft, personal use of work computers, and resistance to employee surveillance.

Wendi J. Everton, Eastern Connecticut State University, Co-Chair

Paul M. Mastrangelo, University of Baltimore, Co-Chair

Rebecca J. Bennett, University of Toledo, The Past, Present, and Future of Workplace Deviance Research

Judith M. Collins, Michigan State University, Tracy McGinley, Michigan State University, Information Security: An Integrated Theory and Empirical Analysis of Identity Fraud in The Workplace

Paul M. Mastrangelo, University of Baltimore, Wendi J. Everton, Eastern Connecticut State University, Jeffrey A. Jolton, Genesee Survey Services, Inc., Personal Use of Work Computers: Is It All Counterproductive?

Melissa Cohen, Bowling Green State University, Christiane Spitzmueller, Bowling Green State University, Jeffrey M. Stanton, Syracuse University, Measuring Employee Compliance and Resistance Intentions Toward Monitoring and Surveillance Policies and Practices

DeeAnn Gehlauf, Gehlauf & Associates, Inc., Discussant

Submitted by Paul M. Mastrangelo, pmastrangelo@ubmail.ubalt.edu

 

149. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 1:302:50 Kent

Linking Organizational Culture to Bottom Line Business Performance

This practitioner forum presents three studies that demonstrate a strong relationship between organizational culture and business performance. These studies report on the relationship between 12 behavioral measures of organizational culture developed by Denison and his colleagues and performance indicators such as customer satisfaction, sales growth, and return on shareholders equity.

Daniel R. Denison, International Institute for Management Development, Co-Chair

Stephanie A. Haaland, Central Michigan University, Co-Chair

William S. Neale, Denison Consulting, Linking Organizational Culture to Sales Growth

Stephanie A. Haaland, Central Michigan University, Linking Organizational Culture to Customer Satisfaction

Daniel R. Denison, International Institute for Management Development, Linking Organizational Culture to Return on Shareholders Equity

Michael Beer, Harvard University, Discussant

Submitted by Stephanie A. Haaland, stephmorlan@home.com

 

150. Symposium: Saturday, 1:302:50 Civic Ballroom

Rethinking Artifact Corrections in Meta-Analysis:  Innovations and Extensions

Correction for statistical artifacts is an essential part of meta-analysis and validity generalization procedures. Recent methodological advances allow greater accuracy in the estimation of artifact distributions, and provide more precise corrections for sampling error, unreliability, and study design effects.

Scott B. Morris, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chair

Michael T. Brannick, University of South Florida, Steve Hall, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Bayesian Estimates in Test Validation

Michael A. Gillespie, Michigan State University, Frederick L. Oswald, Michigan State University, Patrick D. Converse, Michigan State University, On Using Meta-Analysis to Make Judgments About Validity Generalization

Chockalingam Viswesvaran, Florida International University, Deniz S. Ones, University of Minnesota, Frank L. Schmidt, University of Iowa, Reliability Corrections in Meta-Analysis: Issues and Prospects

Scott B. Morris, Illinois Institute of Technology, Richard P. DeShon, Michigan State University, Combining Effect Sizes From Factorial Designs: A Generalizability Theory Perspective

Nambury S. Raju, Illinois Institute of Technology, Discussant

Submitted by Scott B. Morris, scott.morris@iit.edu

 

151. Conversation Hour: Saturday, 2:002:50 Essex

Meet the New SIOP Solutions Editorial Board

Come and learn about the new SIOP Solutions Seriesa book series being launched to provide decision makers with practical, how to advice for dealing with cutting-edge problems in organizations. The goal of the series is to market I-O psychology to managers, executives, and practitioners. Consider being an author!

Elaine D. Pulakos, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Co-Host

Ben E. Dowell, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Co-Host

Jerard F. Kehoe, AT&T, Co-Host

Lise M. Saari, IBM, Co-Host

Jeffery S. Schippmann, PepsiCo, Co-Host

Mark S. Teachout, USAA, Co-Host

Submitted by Elaine D. Pulakos, elainep@pdi-corp.com

 

152. Roundtable: Saturday, 2:002:50 Simcoe/Dufferin

Our Aging Workforce:  Three Alternative Perspectives for I-O Psychologists

This roundtable focuses on three alternative perspectives for studying age-related issues in organizations: work ability, social gerontology, and occupational health. Background information on each perspective will be presented, and a discussion will follow as to how these perspectives might contribute to current efforts of I-O psychologists to study older workers.

James W. Grosch, NIOSH, Co-Host

Janet L. Barnes-Farrell, University of Connecticut, Co-Host

Kenneth S. Shultz, California State UniversitySan Bernardino, Co-Host

Submitted by James W. Grosch, jkg9@cdc.gov

 

Coffee Break: Saturday 3:003:30 Multiple Locations

 

153. Special Event: Saturday, 3:305:20 Grand West

Revision of SIOPs Principles: Process, Outcomes, Q & As

Revision of the 1987 Principles for the Validation and Use of Personnel Selection Procedures was initiated by the Societys Executive Committee in April, 2000. An ad hoc Committee of 12 members was formed and has now completed a revision which will be made available to SIOPs membership on or about March 15, 2002. This invited session will describe the process followed by the Committee and give an overview of the major differences between the 1987 version and the latest version of the Principles. A significant portion of the time will be allotted for Q & As.

P. Richard Jeanneret, Jeanneret & Associates, Inc., Chair

 

154. Special Event: Saturday, 3:305:20 Grand Centre

The Canadian All Stars

Canadians have made significant contribution to the science and practice of I-O psychology. Gary Latham (University of Toronto) will take the role of Larry/Gary King and interview the All Star panel on Canadian issues regarding job analysis (Steven Cronshaw, University of Guelph), the selection interview (Patricia Rowe, University of Waterloo), performance appraisal (Lorne Sulsky, University of Calgary), leadership (Victor Vroom, Yale University), organization commitment (John Meyer, University of Western Ontario), motivation (Craig Pinder, University of Victoria), organizational justice (Daniel Skarlicki, University of British Columbia), and employee withdrawal (Gary Johns, Concordia University).

Gary P. Latham, University of Toronto, Chair

Steven F. Cronshaw, University of Guelph, Panelist

Patricia M. Rowe, University of Waterloo, Panelist

Lorne M. Sulsky, University of Calgary, Panelist

Victor H. Vroom, Yale University, Panelist

John P. Meyer, University of Western Ontario, Panelist

Daniel Skarlicki, University of British Columbia, Panelist

Gary W. Johns, Concordia University, Panelist

 

155. Symposium: Saturday, 3:304:50 Grand East

Coping with Incivility, Hostility, and Abuse in Work Interactions

The symposium explores the organizational and personal correlates of different forms of mistreatment, especially on low-power individuals. Incidence and effects of customer abuse of service employees and faculty abuse of students are introduced. Coping responses to these events are assessed for frequency and effectiveness, and potential interventions discussed.

Alicia A. Grandey, Pennsylvania State University, Chair

Steve M. Jex, University of WisconsinOshkosh, Paul E. Spector, University of South Florida, Interpersonal Conflict at Work: Organizational Context and Employee Disposition, Performance and Health

Analea Brauburger, Pennsylvania State University, Interpersonal Stress for Young Workers: Sources of and Coping with Mistreatment

Alicia A. Grandey, Pennsylvania State University, David N. Dickter, AT&T, Customer Verbal Abuse of Service Representatives: Consequences and Coping

Karen Jagatic, Wayne State University, Loraleigh Keashly, Wayne State University, Faculty Hostility Towards Professionals-in-Training: The Role of Educational Culture and Coping Style

Submitted by Alicia A. Grandey, aag6@psu.edu

 

156. Special Event: Saturday, 3:304:50 Conference B/C

Education and Training in I-O Psychology: Issues, Concerns, Questions:  Open Meeting with the Education and Training and Long Range Planning Committees

One suggestion from the 2001 conference was to hold a regular Open Meeting for individuals involved in educating the next generation of I-O psychologists. Members of the Education and Training and Long Range Planning Committees want to hear SIOP members concerns, issues, or questions with regard to education and training in the field.

Michael J. Burke, Tulane University, Co-Chair

Robert L. Dipboye, Rice University, Co-Chair

Katherine J. Klein, University of Maryland, Co-Chair

Laura L. Koppes, Eastern Kentucky University, Co-Chair

 

157. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 3:304:50 Conference D/E

I-O Industry Careers: A Sneak Peek Into Womens Career Choices

Five recent female I-O graduates along with Nancy Tippins, an established I-O psychologist, will share their career experiences. The panelists will discuss (a) the challenges and opportunities that have shaped their careers, (b) the pros/cons of working in industry, (c) the balance between work and personal life.

Wendy L. Richman-Hirsch, William M. Mercer, Inc., Co-Chair

Michelle A. Donovan, Intel Corporation, Co-Chair

Wendy L. Richman-Hirsch, William M. Mercer, Inc., Panelist

Michelle A. Donovan, Intel Corporation, Panelist

Kathleen J. Suckow, Microsoft Corporation, Panelist

Jennifer J. Deal, Center for Creative Leadership, Panelist

Sandra L. Fisher, Personnel Decisions Research Institute, Panelist

Nancy T. Tippins, Personnel Research Associates, Inc., Panelist

Submitted by Wendy L. Richman-Hirsch, wendy.hirsch@us.wmmercer.com

 

158. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 3:304:50 Conference F

Missing Links in Value Chains: Linkage Research Starting Further Upstream

Linking employee and customer surveys to each other and to the bottom line has become a widespread practice. Historically, most research has dealt with direct-service employees. Moving past this limitation, this session examines how both front-line and back-office employees (and the interplay between them) contribute to customer satisfaction.

Scott M. Brooks, Gantz Wiley Research, Chair

Daniel V. Lezotte, Illinois Institute of Technology, Nambury S. Raju, Illinois Institute of Technology, Isis Garcia, Illinois Institute of Technology, Amy K. Deno, Organizational Strategies, Inc., Linking Internal Service Quality to Customer Satisfaction: What Role Does Job Role Play?

S. Douglas Pugh, University of North CarolinaCharlotte, Joerg Dietz, University of Western Ontario, Scott M. Brooks, Gantz Wiley Research, Jack W. Wiley, Gantz Wiley Research, Employees are the Experts: Improving Linkage Research Through Differation Between Employee Functional Groups

Kyle Lundby, Questar Data Systems, Inc., Kristofer J. Fenlason, 3M, Employee, Customer, Financial Linkages for Boundary Spanning EmployeesPotential Differences in Volume Versus TLC

Stephanie D. Kendall, Gantz Wiley Research, Kerry R. Moechnig, Gantz Wiley Research, Internal Service Capabilities: What Predicts Effectiveness?

Submitted by Scott M. Brooks, Sbrooks@gantzwiley.com

 

159. Panel Discussion: Saturday, 3:305:20 Conference G

Organizational Trauma and Recovery

I-O psychologists are uniquely positioned to address both the individual employee and business issues involved in response and recovery from catastrophic events, like the September 11th terrorist attacks. This panel discusses trauma impact, immediate post-trauma needs and longer-term recovery for employees and organizations, and makes suggestions for research.

Jeanne Carsten, JP Morgan Chase, Chair

Walter Reichman, Baruch CollegeCUNY/Sirota Consulting, Panelist

Renee M. Kurowski, JP Morgan Chase, Panelist

David J. Weston, Hire2Win, LLC, Panelist

Dee Newson, University of South Florida, Panelist

William E. Wymer, UBS PaineWebber, Panelist

Submitted by Jeanne Carsten, Jeanne.Carsten@chase.com

 

160. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 3:304:50 Essex

Speeding Leader Effectiveness

In this interactive session, hear about applied research related to leveraging experiences, streaming leaders, and stimulating higher levels of job satisfaction and achievement. Learn how companies are speeding leader development in order to achieve strategic goals. Take away development resources and techniques for assessing the core capabilities of an organization.

Julian I. Barling, Queens University, Chair

Harvey A. Silver, Management Consultants Inc., Developing Leaders: The 4 Rs of Leadership

Paul T. Van Katwyk, Personnel Decisions International, Leveraging Experience in Leadership Development

Kathleen Grace, Jackson Leadership Systems Inc., Value Chain Analysis: Implications for Leadership Development

Submitted by Kathleen Grace, kgrace@jacksonleadership.com

 

161. Symposium: Saturday, 3:304:50 Windsor

Addressing Projected Workforce Shortages by Recruiting and Retaining Older Workers

One way to address predicted labor shortages will be to recruit and retain older workers. However, it is currently unclear how best to accomplish that goal. Therefore, in this symposium we present a mix of empirical and theoretical papers that address this issue from both the employee and employer perspectives.

Kenneth S. Shultz, California State UniversitySan Bernardino, Chair

Jasmin Loi, California State UniversitySan Bernardino, Kenneth S. Shultz, California State UniversitySan Bernardino, Why Older Adults Seek Employment: Differing Motivations Among Subgroups

Rachel A. August, California State UniversitySacramento, Meanings of Retirement for a New Generation of Workers

Mary Anne Taylor, Clemson University, Dennis Doverspike, University of Akron, Recruitment of Older Employees: A Research-Based Model

Greta Lax, University of WisconsinOshkosh, Gary A. Adams, University of WisconsinOshkosh, Factors Influencing Job Searches Among Older Adults Seeking Bridge Employment

Lisa Finkelstein, Northern Illinois University, Discussant

Submitted by Kenneth S. Shultz, kshultz@csusb.edu 

 

162. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 3:304:50 York

Web-Based 360 Feedback is Old News: Where Do We Go Next?

Feedback (360-degree) is widely accepted and best practices have been known for quite some time. So, where do we go from here? This forum explores growth areas for 360 feedback. The next big advancements will not focus on logistics, but rather on finding new ways to enhance utilization and impact.

Dale S. Rose, 3-D Group, Chair

Mark C. Healy, 3-D Group, Dale S. Rose, 3-D Group, The Good, the Bad, and the Average: All 360 Participants are not Created Equal

Treena L. Gillespie, California State UniversityFullerton, Global 360: Balancing Consistency Across Cultures

Keith Goudy, Organizational Psychologists, Scott C. Thomas, DePaul University, A New Approach to Multisource Feedback: Feedback Participants Can Use

Dale S. Rose, 3-D Group, Tracy Farrell, San Francisco State University, The Use and Abuse of Comments in 360-Degree Feedback

William C. Byham, Development Dimensions International, Discussant

Submitted by Dale S. Rose, drose@3Dgroup.net 

 

163. Special Event: Saturday, 3:304:20 Dominion North

Roundtable Session: Committee on Ethnic Minority Affairs (CEMA)

The host of this session will provide an update on the committees activities during the last year. Following this presentation, new committee members will be selected and new agenda items will be discussed. All SIOP conference participants interested in minority affairs are encouraged to attend. A reception will follow.

Dana G. McDonald-Mann, Development Dimensions International, Host

 

164. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 3:304:50 Dominion South

Realities, Insights, and Actions During Times of Economic Downturn and Change

Our team of consultants will discuss how, as OD professionals, we helped our organizations through the most challenging of times including reductions in force and spin-offs. We will discuss our approach for practical OD solutions and share some of our interventions.

Lyse Wells, Conexant Systems, Inc., Chair

Lyse Wells, Conexant Systems, Inc., The Swinging Pendulum: Reflections From the Search for the Best Structure for OD Support

Amy Fitzgibbons, Conexant Systems, Inc., How to Re-Engage When the Engagement Has Been Called Off: Dealing with the Aftermath of an Organizational Downsizing

Angela Dew, Louisiana State University, A Different Spin on a Downturn

Kristy D. Thomas, Mindspeed Technologies, Responding to Company Needs During Uncertain Times: Creating Quick Hit Tools

Judith A. Solecki, Conexant Systems, Inc., Discussant

Submitted by Lyse Wells, lyse.wells@conexant.com 

 

165. Debate: Saturday, 3:304:50 Wentworth

Does Classical Measurement Theory Apply to I-O Psychology?  The Reliability of Job Performance Ratings

Supervisory ratings of job performance are commonly used in I-O psychology and assessing its reliability is important. Several questions have been debated in the literature. Is rater idiosyncratic variance error? Is shared variance halo? Are there parallel supervisors? A panel of experts address these issues in this debate.

Chockalingam Viswesvaran, Florida International University, Moderator

Deniz S. Ones, University of Minnesota, Chair

John P. Campbell, University of Minnesota, Presenter

Frank J. Landy, SHL, Presenter

Kevin R. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University, Presenter

Frank L. Schmidt, University of Iowa, Presenter

Submitted by Chockalingam Viswesvaran, vish@fiu.edu 

 

166. Practitioner Forum: Saturday, 3:304:50 Kenora

Leadership Development in High-Tech CompaniesThe Latest, Best Thinking

This practitioner forum will examine how leadership development and coaching creates leaders ready to face marketplace challenges in IBM, Motorola, 3M, and at smaller, emerging companies. Information on history, role of CEO, major features, the role of coaching, and future trends will be discussed.

Anna Marie Valerio, IBM, Co-Chair

Angela G. McDermott, McDermott Consulting, Co-Chair

Anna Marie Valerio, IBM, Don M. Moretti, Motorola, Kevin J. Nilan, 3M, Angela G. McDermott, McDermott Consulting, Robert J. Lee, Management Consultant, Leadership Development in High-Tech CompaniesThe Latest, Best Thinking

Robert J. Lee, Management Consultant, Discussant

Submitted by Angela G. McDermott, AngieMcDermott@austin.rr.com 

 

167. Symposium: Saturday, 3:305:20 Huron

Situational Judgment Tests: Constructs, Validity, and Faking

Situational judgment tests are becoming increasingly popular among personnel selection practitioners. This symposium extends our knowledge of situational judgment tests by examining incremental validity, instruction set effects on faking and construct validity, relations between job experience and situational judgment, and efforts to expand the predictor construct space.

Fritz Drasgow, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, Chair

Matthew S. OConnell, Select International, Inc., Michael A. McDaniel, Virginia Commonwealth University, W. Lee Grubb, III, Virginia Commonwealth University, Nathan S. Hartman, Virginia Commonwealth University, Amie D. Lawrence, Select International, Inc., Incremental Validity of Situational Judgment Tests for Task and Contextual Performance

Nhung T. Nguyen, Lamar University, Michael A. McDaniel, Virginia Commonwealth University, Michael Biderman, University of TennesseeChattanooga, Response Instructions in Situational Judgment Tests: Effects on Faking and Construct Validity

Jeff A. Weekley, Kenexa, Robert E. Ployhart, George Mason University, Situational Judgment and Training Experience: Antecedents and Relationships With Performance

Michael A. Gillespie, Michigan State University, Frederick L. Oswald, Michigan State University, Neal W. Schmitt, Michigan State University, Lauren J. Manheim, Michigan State University, Brian Hahn Kim, Michigan State University, A Situational Judgment Test of College Success

Neal W. Schmitt, Michigan State University, Discussant

Submitted by Michael A. McDaniel, mamcdani@vcu.edu 

 

168. Symposium: Saturday, 3:304:50 Kent

. . . In the Hidden Part, You Will Make Me to Know Wisdom

Invariably, with each new data analysis strategy, or with each new twist on existing strategies, comes a host of issues that we must tease apart before we can use those strategies properly. The papers in this symposium identify and explicate such issues as they relate to meta-analysis, structural equation modeling, and latent growth modeling.

Jose M. Cortina, George Mason University, Chair

Jeffrey R. Edwards, University of North Carolina, Tae Y. Kim, University of North Carolina, Moderation in Structural Equation Modeling: Specification, Estimation, and Interpretation Using Quadratic Structural Equations

Roxanne M. Laczo, University of Minnesota, Paul R. Sackett, University of Minnesota, Philip Bobko, Gettysburg College, Jose M. Cortina, George Mason University, Sampling Error in d with Unequal Ns: Correcting a Common Error

Herman Aguinis, University of ColoradoDenver, Michael C. Sturman, Cornell University, Charles A. Pierce, Montana State University, Refining the Integration of the Hunter-Schmidt and Hedges-Olkin Meta-Analytic Approaches

Paul D. Bliese, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Robert E. Ployhart, George Mason University, Growth Modeling as an Ill-Conceived Regression Analysis

Lawrence R. James, University of Tennessee, Discussant

Submitted by Jose M. Cortina, jcortina@gmu.edu 

 

169. Roundtable: Saturday, 3:304:20 Simcoe/Dufferin

Group Learning: The Concept and Its Measurement

This discussion is designed to bring together researchers who are interested in the growing body of work on group learning. As with many emerging research areas, there is considerable variance in the use of the construct. We hope to define the construct space and identify gaps in research and measurement.

Paul S. Goodman, Carnegie Mellon University, Co-Host

Jeanne Wilson, College of William & Mary, Co-Host

Fernando Olivera, University of Western Ontario, Co-Host

Janis A. Cannon-Bowers, Naval Air Warfare Center, Co-Host

Submitted by Jeanne Wilson, jeanne.wilson@business.wm.edu 

 

170. Symposium: Saturday, 3:305:20 Civic Ballroom

Underlying Processes Responsible for Beneficial Mentorships:  Implications of Emerging Research

This symposium presents research exploring the underlying psychological processes involved in effective mentorships. Five papers will be presented outlining factors that may be responsible for the success of these relationships. The advantages of mentorships in volatile, boundaryless organizations will also be discussed. Guidelines for practice and theory will be addressed.

Rachel Day, University of South Florida, Co-Chair

Tammy D. Allen, University of South Florida, Co-Chair

John J. Sosik, Pennsylvania State UniversityGreat Valley, Veronica Godshalk, Pennsylvania State UniversityGreat Valley, The Role of SelfOther Rating Agreement on Mentors Developmental Behavior

Lea Waters, The University of Melbourne, Protege-Mentor Fit in Perceptions of the Provision of Psychosocial Support: The Role of Personality, Job Involvement, Workload, and the Mentoring Relationship

Rachel Day, University of South Florida, Tammy D. Allen, University of South Florida, Why Are Proteges More Successful? Explaining the Mentoring-Career Success Relationship

Lillian T. Eby, University of Georgia, Stacy E. McManus, Concordia University, Proteges Most Positive Mentoring Experiences

Raymond A. Noe, The Ohio State University, David B. Greenberger, The Ohio State University, Sheng Wang, The Ohio State University, Mentor and Protege Benefits from Cross-functional Mentoring Relationships

Belle Rose Ragins, University of WisconsinMilwaukee, Discussant

Submitted by Rachel Day, rday@luna.cas.usf.edu 

 

171. Poster Session: Saturday, 3:304:50 Sheraton Hall

Human Resource Management and Change

171-1 A Multilevel Study of the Personal Impact From Organizational Change

This study furthers research on individual reactions to change. Whereas most recent literature on individual-level outcomes of change has focused on attitudes and behavior, this study provides an understanding of the effects of change by assessing beliefs formed by individuals concerning the impact a change had on them personally.

Steven D. Caldwell, Georgia Institute of Technology

David M. Herold, Georgia Institute of Technology

Donald B. Fedor, Georgia Institute of Technology

Submitted by Steven D. Caldwell, steven.caldwell@mgt.gatech.edu 

171-2 Information Search and Personnel Selection Expertise:  Effects of Information Relevance

This study compared how experts and novices in the domain of personnel selection searched relevant and irrelevant information while making hiring decisions using an information board. Following from Shanteaus (1992) theory of expertise, level of expertise and information relevance moderated the quantity of information search and total information search time.

Jason Lebsack, University of NebraskaOmaha

Lisa L. Scherer, University of NebraskaOmaha

Submitted by Jason Lebsack, clnjal@qwest.net 

171-3 Enhancing Creative Problem Solving in Organizations

A vital step in creative problem solving is solution generation. We found that solution generation was enhanced by using objectives as an aid to elicit alternatives. Need for cognition (NC) was positively related to generating large numbers of alternatives, and the aid was equally effective across levels of NC.

Adam B. Butler, University of Northern Iowa

Lisa L. Scherer, University of NebraskaOmaha

Roni Reiter-Palmon, University of NebraskaOmaha

Submitted by Adam B. Butler, adam.butler@uni.edu 

171-4 Layoffs and Tradeoffs: Production, Quality, and Safety Under Job Insecurity

Employees often face a conflict between production, quality, and safety. It is important to understand the effects of increased layoffs on these potentially competing demands. This experiment found that participants threatened with layoffs were more productive, yet violated more safety rules and produced lower-quality outputs, than control participants.

Tahira M. Probst, Washington State UniversityVancouver

Submitted by Tahira M. Probst, probst@vancouver.wsu.edu 

171-5 Linking Personality to Effective Leader Behavior

A model based upon personality, self-regulation and functional leadership theory was hypothesized to explain effective leader behaviors. Sixty-three leaders completed a battery of individual difference measures and were videotaped while participating in a group activity. The model was partially supported, however none of the Big Five dimensions were fully mediated.

Will Franks, Southwest Missouri State University

Carol F. Shoptaugh, Southwest Missouri State University

Thomas D. Kane, Southwest Missouri State University

Submitted by Carol F. Shoptaugh, cfs280f@smsu.edu 

171-6 When Success Breeds Failure: History, Hysteresis, and Delayed Exit Decisions

In a repeated escalation situation, participants receiving equivocal feedback invested more money and over more opportunities; those who could purchase information invested fewer resources and exited sooner than subjects who did not have the opportunity. Prior experience in a successful venture led to later increased investing when faced with failure.

Donald A. Hantula, Temple University

Jennifer D. Bragger, Montclair State University

Donald Bragger, StorageApps

Jean P. Kirnan, College of New Jersey

Eugene J. Kutcher, PriceWaterhouseCoopers

Submitted by Donald A. Hantula, hantula@temple.edu 

171-7 Peer Nominations Easily Rival Peer Ratings in Predicting Managerial Success

Nominations of top-rated peers correlate in the .90s with the results of complete peer ratings, in this study of 283 middle managers and executives in a firms training program. With less effort to obtain the data, peer nominations predict performance appraisals and promotions just as well as ratings.

Allen I. Kraut, Baruch College/Kraut Associates

Submitted by Allen I. Kraut, allenkraut@aol.com 

171-8 Procedural Justice and Layoff Survivors Commitment: A Quantitative Review

Many layoff studies have examined the correlation between procedural justice and the organizational commitment of layoff survivors. These studies have yielded positive correlations that vary widely. The purpose of this study was to estimate the population correlation and identify the primary sources that cause variation in the correlation across studies.

W. Lee Grubb, III, Virginia Commonwealth University

Michael A. McDaniel, Virginia Commonwealth University

Submitted by Michael A. McDaniel, mamcdani@vcu.edu 

171-9 Attentional Advice:  Effects on Immediate, Delayed, and Transfer Task Performance

The effects of providing attentional advice before practice on immediate, delayed, and transfer performance were examined. Participants engaged in procedural product assembly tasks with supply management duties. Those who received attentional advice made higher profits than those not receiving advice. The benefits of attentional advice to facilitate training are discussed.

Jeff Foster, University of MissouriSt. Louis

Therese H. Macan, University of MissouriSt Louis

Submitted by Therese H. Macan, Therese.Macan@UMSL.edu 

171-10 An Investigation of How Managers Respond to Utility Analysis Information

Research on providing utility analysis (UA) information has shown little to no effects on acceptance of selection tests. Ninety-eight managers provided reactions to UA information. Previous findings are replicated but managers ranked UA information to be useful and influential. Contextual factors also had moderating effects on UA acceptance rates.

Jeff Foster, University of MissouriSt. Louis

Therese H. Macan, University of MissouriSt Louis

Submitted by Therese H. Macan, Therese.Macan@UMSL.edu 

171-11 Conformity in Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Decision-Making Groups

This study examines the influence of gender and discussion setting (face-to-face versus CMC) on three outcomes. The results revealed that males and females in face-to-face groups were significantly more likely to conform, more confident in group solutions, and more satisfied with the group process than individuals in CMC groups.

Michael P. Sherman, Wayne State University

Marcus W. Dickson, Wayne State University

Submitted by Michael P. Sherman, msherman@sun.science.wayne.edu 

171-12 Modes of Measuring Self-Regulation:  Appropriate Assessment of the Construct?

While the construct of self-regulation has increased its presence in a variety of psychological literatures in recent years, its assessment has been inconsistent at best. Data suggest that one dominant way of measuring self-regulation, the traditional Likert-type measure, may be inadequate given our theoretical understanding of the construct.

Morell E. Mullins, Bowling Green State University

Shelba A. Devendorf, Bowling Green State University

Submitted by Morell E. Mullins, mullinm@bgnet.bgsu.edu 

171-13 Assessing the Construct Validity of a Measure of Learning Agility

This study examined the construct validity of the Choices Questionnaire that supports the theory of learning agility. Learning agility predicts an individuals potential to learn in new tasks or jobs. The construct validity will be measured by examining the Choices Questionnaire against a cognitive ability measure and a personality measure.

James Connolly, Aon Management Consulting Group

Chockalingam Viswesvaran, Florida International University

Submitted by James Connolly, james_j_connolly@aoncons.com 

171-14 Enhancing Transfer of Training: The Role of Situational Factors

In this field study, transfer-of-training climate, perceived accountability, and perceptions of legitimacy are predicted to positively relate to transfer of training, as evaluated by trainees supervisors. Results indicate that transfer-of-training climate is positively related to perceived accountability and to transfer of training.

Robin A. Cheramie, Louisiana State University

Marcia J. Simmering, Lousiana State University

Submitted by Robin A. Cheramie, rchera2@lsu.edu 

171-15 Anticipated Regret in Risky Decisions: Risk Preference as a Moderator

This study investigated two theories involving risky behavior: a personality theory that says individuals have a general risk-taking disposition and a regret-minimizing theory that says individuals choose the option with the least potential for regret. This study found support for both theories, as well as partial support for an interaction.

Rebecca R. Harris, Pennsylvania State University

Susan Mohammed, Pennsylvania State University

Submitted by Rebecca R. Harris, rrh134@psu.edu 

171-16 Faculty Barriers to Family-Friendly Policies: Snapshots from the Ivory Tower

This paper outlines current trends in research regarding barriers to the use of family-friendly policies in organizations. Interestingly, this study explores the unique constraints faced by faculty with regard to policy use. Finally, a qualitative approach to research and analyses is used to uncover perceived barriers and encourage future research.

Rebecca R. Harris, Pennsylvania State University

Candace E. Blair, Pennsylvania State University

Alicia A. Grandey, Pennsylvania State University

Submitted by Rebecca R. Harris, rrh134@psu.edu 

171-17 Employee Commitment Under Conditions of Change: A Longitudinal Study

We conducted a longitudinal study to examine the dynamic relations between employee commitment (to the organization and to a change initiative) and behavior (turnover intention and support for the change) during organizational change. Changes in commitment were found to predict changes in behavior, and relations were stronger for target-relevant commitments.

Laryssa Topolnytsky, University of Western Ontario

John P. Meyer, University of Western Ontario

Submitted by John P. Meyer, meyer@uwo.ca 

171-18 Assessing Goldbergs International Personality Item Pool:  A Multitrait-Multimethod Examination

This study provided preliminary evidence on the construct validity of Goldbergs measure by comparing it to the NEO-FFI. Structural equation modeling was used to conduct the multitrait-multimethod analyses. Overall, a model of five correlated trait factors and one method factor provided the best fit for the data.

Beng-Chong Lim, University of Maryland

Robert E. Ployhart, George Mason University

Submitted by Beng-Chong Lim, blim@psyc.umd.edu 

171-19 Exploring Factors Related to Energy Conservation Behaviors in Organizations

This study explores the factors that inhibit and facilitate energy conservation in organizations, using focus groups and surveys. It was found that knowledge of how to conserve energy, social norms, personal responsibility, and beliefs about the importance of conserving energy are related to reported conservation behaviors. Implications are discussed.

Paula M. Popovich, Ohio University

Scott Finlinson, Ohio University

Charles A. Scherbaum, Ohio University

Sherwood Wilson, The Ohio University

Kris Hoffer, VESTAR, Inc.

Andy Sinozich, VESTAR, Inc.

Submitted by Paula M. Popovich, popovich@ohiou.edu 

171-20 Personality and Company Culture:  Contributions to Innovation for Small Businesses

The present study proposed that personality traits would relate to the support for innovation, support of innovation would relate to innovation rate, and innovation rate would relate to financial performance. Support was found for all of these relationships. Supporting innovation served as a source of competitive advantage for small businesses.

Mark Brendle, Clemson University

Fred S. Switzer, Clemson University

Wayne H. Stewart, Clemson University

Caron H. St. John, Clemson University

Submitted by Mark Brendle, mbrendl@clemson.edu 

171-21 Effects of Job-Related Variables on Positive and Negative Creativity

Positively and negatively directed creativity were investigated using situational and individual-difference variables. The results indicated that perceiving organizational injustices led to suppressed levels of positive and negative creativity. People with many negative ideas, people with few positive emotions, and females with high organizational cynicism were found to generate more negative creativity.

Kimberly C. Hastey, Colorado State University

Keith James, Colorado State University

Submitted by Kimberly C. Hastey, khastey@lamar.colostate.edu 

171-22 The Manager-Consultant Relationship:  Implementation Success of Organizational Change

The purpose of this study was to examine how negative expectations, cynicism, relationship with a consultant, and manager change skills influenced client satisfaction and engagement success in organizational change. Relationship with the consultant predicted client satisfaction, which in turn predicted engagement success.

Stefanie A. Pressl, Lockheed Federal Credit Union

Janet L. Kottke, California State University

Submitted by Janet L. Kottke, jkottke@csusb.edu 

171-23 The Changing Nature of Sexual Harassment

This research examined differences in sexual harassment perceptions depending on the communication medium (online or face-to-face). Online behavior was perceived similarly, and in some cases, more harassing than face-to-face behavior. In a second study, attributions of responsibility and other reactions to the behaviors are examined in greater detail.

Barbara A. Ritter, University of Akron

Dennis Doverspike, University of Akron

Submitted by Barbara A. Ritter, britter@uakron.edu 

171-24 Is There a Technology Age Gap?

This study explored the extent to which older, middle-aged, and younger computer programmers reported different levels of human capital and specialized computer skills. It also explored the effect of age on annual salary and job benefits controlling for both human capital factors and specialized computer skills.

Elissa L. Perry, Teachers College, Columbia University

Patricia A Simpson, Loyola UniversityChicago

Orla M. NicDomhnaill, Teachers College, Columbia University

Deanna M. Siegel, Teachers College, Columbia University

Submitted by Elissa L. Perry, ep248@columbia.edu 

171-25 Comprehension of Complex Data Under Different Display Conditions

The study investigated the effects of display type, display complexity, user experience, and question difficulty on the performance of people processing on-screen data. The results showed that graphs were superior to tables for difficult questions, and the experienced users responded slower and explored more screen elements than novice users.

B. Charles Tatum, National University

David Dickason, Navy Personnel Research, Studies and Technology

Submitted by B. Charles Tatum, ctatum@nu.edu 

171-26 Relationships Between Conscientiousness, Self-Efficacy, Self-Deception, and Learning Over Time

The present study examined the dual mediating effects of self-efficacy and self-deception on the conscientiousnesslearning relationship. The results showed that both self-efficacy and self-deception mediated the effect of conscientiousness on learning but in opposite directions. Furthermore, the relative impact of self-efficacy and self-deception on learning changed over time as expected.

Sunhee Lee, The Ohio State University

Howard J. Klein, The Ohio State University

Submitted by Sunhee Lee, lee.912@osu.edu 

171-27 Assessing Job Applicants: The Influence of Selection Methods and Constructs

The present study examined selection and job applicant evaluations as a function of specific selection methods and constructs. A total of 277 HR practitioners each evaluated a single hypothetical job applicant. Those applicants assessed through some measure of Conscientiousness via an interview were rated most favorably overall.

David J. Topor, Performance Engineering

Stephen M. Colarelli, Central Michigan University

Submitted by David J. Topor, david.topor@tri-c.cc.oh.us 

171-28 Emerging Themes in Distance Learning: Some Food for Thought

Distance learning programs are being implemented throughout academia and industry. Researchers have not been able to keep up with practice, and consequently, practitioners have been implementing distance learning programs using the guidelines and principles developed for and validated in traditional classrooms. We identify recent themes in distance learning research.

Mary Kosarzycki, University of Central Florida

Eduardo Salas, University of Central Florida

C. Shawn Burke, University of Central Florida

Stephen M. Fiore, University of Central Florida

Submitted by Mary Kosarzycki, rombert@aol.com 

171-29 Can Conscientiousness Help Explain Escalation of Commitment Behavior?

This study examines the association between several sub-facets of conscientiousness and escalation behavior. It replicates Boehne and Paeses (2000) study, in which they support the project completion explanation of escalation behavior. Several sub-facets were associated with escalation behavior. Both project completion and profit motive explanations of escalation behavior were supported.

Robert D. Yonker, University of MissouriSt. Louis

Paul W. Paese, University of MissouriSt Louis

Submitted by Robert D. Yonker, s1023166@admiral.umsl.edu 

171-30 Predicting Transfer of Training: A Four-Country Study

The validity of the trainee characteristic element of Baldwin and Fords (1988) transfer of training model was tested using data from four countries. The findings support the motivation-transfer relationship but not the job involvement-transfer relationship.

Shreya T. Sarkar-Barney, Human Capital Growth/IIT

Submitted by Shreya T. Sarkar-Barney, sarkarbarney@yahoo.com 

171-31 Effects of Group Size and Problem Difficulty on Decision Accuracy

Decisions made by groups were more accurate than the initial responses of their individual members. As group size increased from 2 to 5 members, the superiority of group over individual accuracy increased from 8.8% to 15.2%. The more difficult the problem, the greater the superiority of groups over individuals.

Ira T. Kaplan, Hofstra University

Submitted by Ira T. Kaplan, ira.kaplan@hofstra.edu 

171-32 Importance of Learning and Development Opportunity to Job Choice Decisions

Examined the degree to which job seekers valued and would seek development opportunities. Experiment 1 (utilizing rating and ranking scales) and Experiment 2 (utilizing policy capturing) found that development opportunity is an important consideration in job choice decisions especially for decisions to accept rather than apply for a job.

Francisco Gabriel Barbeite, Georgia Institute of Technology

Todd J. Maurer, Georgia Institute of Technology

Submitted by Francisco Gabriel Barbeite, gt7556a@prism.gatech.edu 

171-33 The Development of a Creativity Instrument for Organizations

This paper examines the design and preliminary validation of a new forced-choice instrument for the identification of creative individuals in organizations. The new scale shows both discriminate and convergent validity with known creativity indicators. Implications are discussed.

Sam T. Hunter, University of Southern Mississippi

Richard Metzger, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Submitted by Sam T. Hunter, Hunterst107@Yahoo.com 

171-34 Effects of Alternative Presentations of Negative Information on Job Expectations

In the context of a job preview, we investigated how the presentation of negative information affects job-seeker perceptions of the job and organization. Findings suggest that the use of negative information packaging strategies leads to different levels of attraction to the job and trust in the organization.

Margaret E. Brooks-Laber, Bowling Green State University

Scott Highhouse, Bowling Green State University

Submitted by Margaret E. Brooks-Laber, mlaber@bgnet.bgsu.edu 

171-35 Sex Differences in Self-Efficacy: Effects of Training Delivery Context

The current study examined whether pretraining self-efficacy differed between men and women participating in traditionally masculine tasks and, if so, whether sex differences could be mitigated by manipulating the training delivery context. Results indicated that womens self-efficacy increased when using instructions containing feminine pronouns while mens self-efficacy remained constant.

Jenny Post, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Lauri Hyers, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Jeffrey D. Kudisch, University of Southern Mississippi

Submitted by Jeffrey D. Kudisch, j.kudisch@usm.edu 

171-36 Strategic Integration of HRM, Competitive Strategy, Turnover, and Organizational Performance

This study examines the impact of integrating the HR function with corporate strategy processes on organizational performance. Results from a sample of 272 Australian businesses indicate that such integration diminishes employee turnover and improves both HR outcomes and operational performance. For market performance, integration effects were moderated by competitive strategy.

Neal Knight-Turvey, University of QueenslandAustralia

Submitted by Neal Knight-Turvey, neal@psy.uq.edu.au 

171-37 Issues in Implementing Tactical Utility Analysis

Tactical Utility Analysis (TUA) is a modified approach to utility analysis that allows the decision support capabilities of UA to be extended beyond programmatic decisions to more of the day-to-day tactical HRM decisions faced by line managers. We examine TUA methods and the challenges associated with implementing TUA in organizations.

Kevin D. Carlson, Virginia Tech

Mary L. Connerley, Virginia Tech

Submitted by Mary L. Connerley, maryc@vt.edu 

171-38 Greenfield Plants: Catalysts of Change

Greenfields are recognized as one of the most successful organizational strategies of the last decade, yet evaluation of these new plants has been limited. Proposed as catalysts of change within organizations, greenfields share a unique management philosophy and implementation of high-performance work practices. Developmental and longitudinal studies are needed.

Wendy S. Becker, University at AlbanySUNY

Submitted by Wendy S. Becker, w.becker@albany.edu 

171-39 Environmental Control and Workplace Design on Performance, Effectiveness, and Collaboration

The relationships between office workplace design factors (layout and storage) and individual performance, team collaboration, and team effectiveness, were tested with 117 office workers using surveys. Environmental control was hypothesized to link these relationships. Mediating effects were not found, however, direct effects among these tested variables were significant.

Yueng-Hsiang E Huang, Liberty Mutual Research Center

Michelle Robertson, Liberty Mutual Research Center

Submitted by Yueng-Hsiang E Huang, yueng-hsiang.huang@Libertymutual.com 

171-40 Industrial-Organizational Psychology Programs Comprehensive Exam Procedures and Practices

This research characterizes current comprehensive exam practices and procedures in I-O psychology graduate programs. Results indicate that purpose, content, and structures are useful variables for differentiating programs. Differences in organizational outcomes by these variables are reported, as well as, faculty, student, and alumni responses regarding practices associated with the exam.

Lisa A. Boyce, George Mason University

Tara D. Carpenter, George Mason University

Kara A. Incalcaterra, George Mason University

Submitted by Lisa A. Boyce, Boycela@msn.com 

171-41 The Use of Simulation and Training Effectiveness: A Meta-Analysis

The purpose of this meta-analysis is to quantify the effectiveness of simulator training and identify moderators of the simulator-training effectiveness relationship. The use of simulators was weakly related to training performance. Fidelity was identified as a moderator of the relationship between the use of simulation and training effectiveness.

Tara D. Carpenter, George Mason University

Eric J. Barger, George Mason University

Submitted by Eric J. Barger, eric11@mindspring.com 

171-42 Collaborative Relationships Among Older Workers:  Compensating for Age-Related Deficits

Competing theories suggest older employees (a) should become more selective in workplace commitments, and, in contrast, (b) should use social involvement to compensate for age-related decrements. Study results indicate work-relationships help compensate for age-related issues and serve as important support systems in the workplace.

James H. Killian, University of Tulsa

Robert O. Hansson, University of Tulsa

Brendan C. Lynch, University of Tulsa

Submitted by James H. Killian, james-killian@utulsa.edu 

171-43 Understanding The Strategic Motivations For Outsourcing HR Activities

We examined strategic objectives for outsourcing HR practices. Results indicate that realizing cost benefits is associated with outsourcing administrative practices (benefits/payroll) while accessing external expertise is related to outsourcing technical practices (legal/HRIS). Operational practices (training/development/recruitment/selection) are associated with both objectives.

David P. Lepak, University of Maryland

Kathryn M. Bartol, University of Maryland

Sharyn Gardner, University of Maryland

Submitted by Sharyn Gardner, sgardner@rhsmith.umd.edu 

171-44 A Causal Model of Accident Frequency and Severity

Previous research has identified personality correlates of accidents, although much of this work has been conducted in the absence of a theoretical framework. We used the five-factor model of personality and causal modeling to predict accident frequency and severity. Results provided some support for the causal model.

Michael J. Garrity, Clemson University

Patrick H. Raymark, Clemson University

Submitted by Michael J. Garrity, mgarrit@clemson.edu 

171-45 Evaluating an Upper-Extremity Functioning Measure for Students

Two million workers suffer upper extremity (musculoskeletal) disorders (UEDs) each year costing billions of dollars. Students also suffer UEDs due to excessive computer usage. Preventive measures to reduce students UEDs before they begin work require appropriate assessment. Item response theory was used to evaluate a UED-functioning scale for students.

Lacey L. Schmidt, University of Houston

Benjamin C. Amick III, University of Texas Health Science Center

Jeffrey N. Katz, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard

Barbara B. Ellis, University of Houston

Submitted by Lacey L. Schmidt, laceys@pdq.net 

171-46 Pre-Discussion Dissent Improves Decision Quality in Groups

An experimental study on group decision making in hidden profile situations is reported. As predicted, dissent in prediscussion preferences increased consideration of unshared information and led to better group decisions. Furthermore, dissent was especially productive in groups in which one member held a preference for the superior alternative.

Rudolf Kerschreiter, Ludwig-MaximiliansUniversity Munich

Felix C. Brodbeck, Aston University

Stefan Schulz-Hardt, Ludwig-MaximiliansUniversity Munich

Andreas Mojzisch, Ludwig-MaximiliansUniversity Munich

Dieter Frey, Ludwig-MaximiliansUniversity Munich

Submitted by Rudolf Kerschreiter, kerschreiter@psy.uni-muenchen.de 

171-47 Nations Under Stress: Masculinity/Femininity and Stress Responses

This study examines the relationships between the masculinity/femininity dimension of national culture, perceived stress, and burnout. Results indicate that perceived stress fully mediates the culture-burnout relationship. Practical implications of these results are discussed, and recommendations for future empirical inquiry are made.

Suzanne Zivnuska, Florida State University

David A. Ralston, University of Connecticut

Pamela L. Perrewe, Florida State University

Alan Wallace, Mesa State College

Isabelle Maignan, The University of Groningen

Submitted by Suzanne Zivnuska, szivnuska@yahoo.com 

171-48 Effects of Definitional Explicitness and Rating Method on Creativity Assessment

This study explored the effects of different creative performance-assessment techniques on interrater reliability. Judges rated solutions generated to an ill-defined organizational problem using one of three techniques. Results showed that rating the components of a creative output, originality and appropriateness, separately produced the highest interrater reliability.

Jody J. Illies, St. Cloud State University

Lisa M. Kobe, CPS Human Resource Services

Roni Reiter-Palmon, University of NebraskaOmaha

Submitted by Jody J. Illies, jjillies@stcloudstate.edu 

171-49 Transformational Leadership, Individual Values, and Creativity:  Evidence from Korea

We investigate relations between dimensions of transformational leadership and creativity at the dyad level. In a sample of R&D employees working in 46 Korean companies, we found that intellectual stimulation, individualized consideration, and charisma/inspirational influence had positive effects on followers creativity. We also found some interesting mediating and moderating effects.

Shung Jae Shin, Texas A&M University

Jing Zhou, Texas A&M University

Submitted by Shung Jae Shin, sjshin@cgsb.tamu.edu 

171-50 Predicting Workplace Aggression in Part-Time Teenage Employees

This study examines (a) whether interactional injustice, supervisory over-control, and abusive supervision directed towards teenage employees predicts aggression towards supervisors, and (b) whether teenagers reasons for working and job involvement moderate these relationships. The present data provides strong support for the moderating impact of these variables on teenage workersaggression.

Kathryne E. Dupre, Queens University

Michelle Inness, Queens University

Julian I. Barling, Queens University

Catherine Connelly, Queens University

Colette Hoption, Queens University

Submitted by Kathryne E. Dupre, 9ked@qlink.queensu.ca 

171-51 Applicants Failing Drug Tests: Desirable or Undesirable Predictor Scores?

How do predictor scores of applicants who fail preemployment drug testing compare to those who pass? The current study examines this question and how this information may be used to position drug testing within a selection process in a manner that is efficient, economical, and benefits diversity hiring goals.

Jennifer M. Hurd, Aon Consulting

Matthew Dreyer, Aon Consulting

Submitted by Matthew Dreyer, matthew_j_dreyer@aoncons.com 

171-52 Effectiveness of Distance Learning for Army Battle Staff Training

This paper compared two distance-learning approaches to traditional classroom training in the U.S. Army. Course satisfaction, knowledge retention, and job performance were measured. Students were less satisfied with the distance-learning version of the course; however, all students performed equally regarding knowledge retention and received equivalent supervisory job performance ratings.

Debra J. Drenth, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Robert A. Wisher, U.S. Army Research Institute

Ulf Chris Kubisiak, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Christina K. Curnow, Caliber Associates

Walter C. Borman, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Submitted by Debra J. Drenth, ddrenth@luna.cas.usf.edu 

 

172. Special Event: Saturday, 4:305:20 Elgin

Reception: Committee on Ethnic Minority Affairs (CEMA)

All SIOP conference participants are invited to attend this reception. This is an excellent opportunity to meet others with similar interests and to learn more about this committee.

Dana G. McDonald-Mann, Development Dimensions International, Host

 

173. Roundtable: Saturday, 4:305:20 Simcoe/Dufferin

The Path to Executive CoachingWhere Do I Begin?

Executive coaching has become increasingly popular in organizations. Yet, few I-O programs provide training in this area. How does one accumulate the knowledge and necessary experience to embark on a coaching career? Two leading executive coaches from diverse backgrounds (I-O and clinical) present their ideas on training and educating coaches.

Rodney Warrenfeltz, Hogan Assessment Systems, Co-Host

Theodore C. Bililies, Personnel Dimensions International, Inc., Co-Host

Lori Marrs, Hogan Assessment Systems, Co-Host

Sarah A. Strupeck, University of Tulsa, Co-Host

Dayna L. Tomlin, University of Tulsa, Co-Host

Submitted by Lori Marrs, tmarrs3@aol.com 

 

Evening Reception: Saturday, 6:308:30 Grand Ballroom

 

Program Table of Contents