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FRIDAY AM

100. Interactive Posters: 8:00 AM–8:50 AM  
Astoria

Faking It: Response Distortion Across Testing Contexts

Neil Christiansen, Central Michigan University, Facilitator
 

100-1 The Fakability of Explicit and Implicit Measures of Conscientiousness

The fakability of 3 measures of Conscientiousness was examined: the IPIP, the Conditional Reasoning Test, and Implicit Association Tests. Data from a student sample (N = 442) found the Conditional Reasoning Test and IAT were the least susceptible to faking, but they did not have a meaningful relationship with the IPIP.

Jenna N. Filipkowski, Wright State University

Suzanne L. Dean, Wright State University

Kathryn Van Dixhorn, Wright State University

Corey E. Miller, Wright State University

Submitter: Suzanne Dean, srosenberg82@hotmail.com
 

100-2 The Faking Dilemma: Competing Motivations in Respondents’ Decision to Fake

Several situational variables hypothesized to either encourage or discourage the motivation to fake a preemployment personality test were manipulated in a policy-capturing experiment. The situational variables altered the anticipated risks and benefits associated with faking with corresponding changes in participants’ motivation to fake.

Jennifer A. Komar, University of Waterloo

Shawn Komar, University of Waterloo

Douglas J. Brown, University of Waterloo

Submitter: Jennifer Komar, jennifer.komar@gmail.com
 

100-3 Interviews Assessing Personality Are Less Fakable Than Self-Report Measures

Interviews and self-report measures assessed personality for 194 participants in honest and applicant conditions. This study sought to examine (a) if the 5-factor model is able to be assessed with interviews similarly to self-report measures, and (b) are interviews prone to the same amount of faking as self-report measures?

Daniel Nguyen, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Matthew J. Borneman, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Gregory G. Manley, University of Texas-San Antonio

Submitter: Daniel Nguyen, danpsy@siu.edu
 

100-4 Faking at the Individual Level: How Many People “Fake Bad?”

This study examined the notion that when attempting to elevate their scores on personality measures some actually reduce them. As hypothesized, this research suggests that a significant number of people (26%) actually faked in the wrong direction on at least 1 of the 5 personality scales.

Benjamin A. Tryba, Florida Institute of Technology

Matthew D. Pita, Florida Institute of Technology

Casey A. Cook, Florida Institute of Technology

Lindsey M. Lee, Florida Institute of Technology

Richard L. Griffith, Florida Institute of Technology

Margaret Jenkins, Seminole State College

Submitter: Benjamin Tryba, btryba2009@my.fit.edu
 


101. Symposium/Forum: 8:00 AM–9:50 AM  
Boulevard AB

Ability, Personality, and Motivational Influences on Aging and Work

The aging of the workforce has spurred research examining the relationship between age and key outcomes such as retirement intentions, turnover, organizational commitment, and training success. This symposium examines individual differences (e.g., motivation, personality, abilities) that influence these relationships and illuminates the psychological processes influencing aging and work.

Margaret E. Beier, Rice University, Chair

Dorien Kooij, Tilburg University, Matthijs Bal, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Aging and Work-Related Motives

Ruth Kanfer, Georgia Institute of Technology, Julie Nguyen, Georgia Institute of Technology, Retirement and Workforce Participation Intentions in a Down Economy

Mo Wang, University of Maryland, Laura Wolkoff, University of Maryland, Cognitive Ability and Personality in Predicting Dynamic Bridge Employment Patterns

David Cadiz, Portland State University, Donald M. Truxillo, Portland State University, Robert R. Sinclair, Clemson University, Talya N. Bauer, Portland State University, Age Moderates the Core Self-Evaluations, Turnover Intentions, and Commitment Relationship

Margaret E. Beier, Rice University, Shu Wang, Rice University, Ashley Rittmayer Hanks, Rice University, Amy E. Crook, Rice University, Designing Training for Different Types of Learners: Age Matters

Submitter: Margaret Beier, beier@rice.edu
 


102. Symposium/Forum: 8:00 AM–9:20 AM  
Boulevard C

Pregnant, Disabled, Sick, Surviving: Experiences and Outcomes of Workplace Stigma

At work, people are expected to be healthy and capable. An identity that appears to conflict with these expectations leads to stigmatization, which can result in discrimination. We present 4 studies of workplace stigma among pregnant workers, cancer survivors, workers with chronic illness, and workers with physical disabilities.

Alyssa McGonagle, University of Connecticut, Co-Chair

Janet L. Barnes-Farrell, University of Connecticut, Co-Chair

Kristen P. Jones, George Mason University, Eden B. King, George Mason University, Veronica L. Gilrane, George Mason University, Tracy C. McCausland, George Mason University, The Baby Bump: Managing a Dynamic Stigma Over Pregnancy’s Course

Larry R. Martinez, Rice University, Michelle (Mikki) Hebl, Rice University, Childhood Cancer Survivors’ Workplace Experiences

Alyssa McGonagle, University of Connecticut, Janet L. Barnes-Farrell, University of Connecticut, Testing a Model of Chronic Illness Stigma in the Workplace

Joel E. Lynch, Rockford College, Lisa Finkelstein, Northern Illinois University, Organizational Decision Making Regarding Employees With Physical Disabilities: Shifting Standards

Submitter: Alyssa McGonagle, alyssa.mcgonagle@uconn.edu
 


103. Panel Discussion: 8:00 AM–9:20 AM  
Continental A

Graduate Study From 30,000 Feet: Global Perspectives on Learning Abroad

The objective of this panel discussion is to engage parties in a discussion of the benefits and costs of international graduate study, giving consideration to developmental, financial, professional, and personal outcomes. Included will be expert perspectives from graduate students, faculty, and practitioners.

Marcus D. Weller, Wayne State University, Co-Chair

Juan M. Madera, University of Houston, Co-Chair

Beverly G. Burke, Middle Tennessee State University, Panelist

Jose M. Peiro-Silla, University of Valencia, Panelist

Martin Noack, Jacobs University Bremen, Panelist

Submitter: Marcus Weller, marcusweller@wayne.edu
 


104. Symposium/Forum: 8:00 AM–9:50 AM  
Continental B

Profiles in Commitment: Person-Centered Approaches to Occupational and Organizational Attachment

Researchers have increasingly recognized the value of person-centered (i.e., profile) approaches for understanding commitment in organizations. Our symposium presents 5 studies investigating various profiles of organizational and/or occupational commitment. These studies illustrate the general potential of person-centered approaches for I-O psychology and highlight methodological strategies for person-centered research.

Robert R. Sinclair, Clemson University, Chair

Lindsay E. Sears, Clemson University, Chair

Lindsay E. Sears, Clemson University, Robert R. Sinclair, Clemson University, Predictors and Outcomes of Occupational Commitment Profiles Among Nurses

Elyse Maltin, The University of Western Ontario, Laura J. Stanley, University of Georgia, John P. Meyer, University of Western Ontario, Profiles of Organizational and Professional Commitment: Implications for Well-Being

Silvia Dello Russo, University of Rome, Michele Vecchione, University of Rome, Laura Borgogni, University of Rome, Commitment Profiles, Job Satisfaction, and Behavioral Outcomes in Italy

William Lancaster, University of Memphis, Ronald S. Landis, University of Memphis, Can the Use of Organizational Commitment Profiles Predict Turnover Behavior?

Chester Chun Seng Kam, University of Western Ontario, John P. Meyer, University of Western Ontario, Laryssa Topolnytsky, University of Western Ontario, Management Trustworthiness and Commitment Profiles Under Conditions of Change

Lois E. Tetrick, George Mason University, Discussant

Submitter: Robert Sinclair, rsincla@clemson.edu
 


105. Symposium/Forum: 8:00 AM–9:20 AM  
Continental C

Emotional Display Rule Deviance: Antecedents and Consequences

Display rule deviance occurs when employees express emotions that are inconsistent with emotional display norms. Four empirical studies are presented that examine antecedents and consequences of display rule deviance. The researchers will discuss both volitional and nonvolitional deviance from display rules, and several different operationalizations of deviance will be explored.

Erin M. Richard, Florida Institute of Technology, Chair

Patricia B. Barger, DDI, Jennifer Z. Gillespie, Bowling Green State University, Customer
Injustice, Felt Anger, and Display Rule Deviance

Kristen L. Randolph, The College of New Jersey, Jason Dahling, The College of New Jersey, Proactive Personality and Task Significance in the Emotional Labor Process

Erin M. Richard, Florida Institute of Technology, Patrick D. Converse, Florida Institute of Technology, Elizabeth Steinhauser, DEOMI, Emotional Display Rule Deviance as Self-Regulatory Failure

William Becker, Texas Christian University, Russell S. Cropanzano, University of Arizona, Group Display Rules and Emotional Labor in Work Teams

James M. Diefendorff, University of Akron, Discussant

Submitter: Erin Richard, erichard@fit.edu
 


106. Symposium/Forum: 8:00 AM–9:20 AM  
International Ballroom South

Follow Through, the Key to ROI in Executive Coaching

Despite enormous popularity, questions linger about the value of executive coaching. And although psychologists focus on insight, the impact of coaching hinges on follow-through action. Four seasoned coaches will share methods, tools, and techniques for beefing up the back end of coaching to maximize the odds of improving performance.

Robert B. Kaiser, Kaplan DeVries Inc., Chair

David B. Peterson, PDI Ninth House, Velcro, Not Teflon: Enhancing Transfer and Follow-Through in Executive Coaching

Sandra O. Davis, MDA Leadership Consulting, Creating Impact Through Alignment: A Practitioner’s Experience

Robert B. Kaiser, Kaplan DeVries Inc., Darren V. Overfield, Kaplan DeVries Inc., eTools for Executing Development Plans

Darren V. Overfield, Kaplan DeVries Inc., Discussant

Submitter: Robert Kaiser, rkaiser@kaplandevries.com
 


107. Panel Discussion: 8:00 AM–8:50 AM  
Joliet

Mergers and Acquisitions: Sharing Lessons Learned

Mergers and acquisitions are an important element for corporate growth that require significant expertise for success. In this panel HR leaders from several industries will discuss the role of I-O psychology in facilitating success. The discussion will focus on their experience in recent M&A activity including application of lessons learned.

Robin R. Cohen, Bank of America, Chair

Kim Stepanski, Pfizer, Panelist

Miriam Ort, Avon, Panelist

Eryn A. O’Brien, Bank of America, Panelist

Submitter: Kim Stepanski, kim.stepanski@pfizer.com
 


108. Symposium/Forum: 8:00 AM–8:50 AM  
Lake Erie

Workplace Civility Perceptions: Measurement, Effects of Organizational Roles, and Demographics

This symposium focuses on measuring employee perceptions of interpersonal climate, specifically workplace civility. Presenters examine perceptions of civility versus incivility, effects of demographic differences, and effects of organizational roles on employees’ ratings of these constructs as they pertain to describing organizational environments and to experiencing particular individuals.

Katerine Osatuke, Miami University, Chair

Erik Naimon, Xavier University, Morell E. Mullins, Xavier University, Katerine Osatuke, Miami University, Workplace Incivility and Civility: Related but Different?

Thomas Brassell, Xavier University, Katerine Osatuke, Miami University, Boris I. Yanovsky, Xavier University, Sue R. Dyrenforth, VHA NCOD, 360-Degree Feedback: Rater Differences in Rating Workplace Interpersonal Behaviors

Robert Teclaw, VHA NCOD, Thomas Brassell, Xavier University, Sue R. Dyrenforth, VHA NCOD, Katerine Osatuke, Miami University, Gender Differences in Civility Perceptions in a Large Healthcare System

Mark S. Nagy, Xavier University, Discussant

Submitter: Katerine Osatuke, Katerine.Osatuke@va.gov
 


109. Roundtable Discussion/Conversation Hour: 8:00 AM–8:50 AM  
Lake Huron

Text Mining Insights

Qualitative data in the form of comments are collected widely in organizations. Text mining can reduce the work needed to gain insights from these data. However, many industrial-organizational psychologists are less familiar with the available techniques. This session will address common questions, recent experiences, and new developments in this area.

Robert E. Gibby, Procter & Gamble, Host

Wayne C. Lee, Valtera, Host

A. Silke McCance, Proctor & Gamble, Host

Submitter: Wayne Lee, wlee@valtera.com
 


110. Symposium/Forum: 8:00 AM–9:20 AM  
Lake Michigan

The Latest and Greatest in Workplace Safety Research

Academics and practitioners present the latest research on workplace safety. Topics include using personality to predict safety performance and outcomes, examining differences in safety climate perceptions, and investigating how different types of stressors affect safety performance. Presenters discuss practical implications of their findings and directions for future safety research.

Ashley E. J. Palmer, Hogan Assessment Systems, Chair

Mindy E. Bergman, Texas A&M University, Autumn D. Krauss, Kronos Talent Management Division, Jeremy M. Beus, Texas A&M University, Xiaohong Xu, Texas A&M University, Safety Performance, Safety Skills, and Safety-Related Personality Traits

Stephen Nichols, Hogan Assessment Systems, Ashley E. J. Palmer, Hogan Assessment Systems, Matthew R. Lemming, Hogan Assessment Systems, Jeff Foster, Hogan Assessment Systems, Development, Validation, and Utility of Personality-Based Safety Scales
Kim Pluess, Peter Berry Consultancy, Managerial and Nonmanagerial Differences in Safety Climate Perceptions

Sharon Clarke, The University of Manchester, Differential Effects of Challenge and Hindrance Stressors on Safety Outcomes

Michael S. Christian, University of North Carolina, Discussant

Submitter: Ashley Johnson, ajohnson@hoganassessments.com
 


111. Panel Discussion: 8:00 AM–9:20 AM  
Lake Ontario

Implementing New Performance Management Programs: Challenges and Change Management

Panelists from diverse industries will share experiences making large-scale changes to their organization’s performance management programs. The panelists will describe the change management strategies employed and how they overcame various obstacles or setbacks in their organizations to achieve successful outcomes.

Morgan J. Murphy, JCPenney Co. Inc., Co-Chair

Lee J. Konczak, Washington University, Co-Chair

Damian J. Stelly, JCPenney Co. Inc., Panelist

Becca A. Baker, JCPenney Co. Inc., Panelist

Nathan Brewster, FedEx Express, Panelist

Jennifer M. Dembowski, FedEx Express, Panelist

Matthew R. Walter, Bank of America, Panelist

Thomas B. Walk, MetLife, Panelist

Jared D. Lock, Carr & Associates, Panelist

Amy M. Bladen, Leadership Variations, Panelist

Submitter: Morgan Murphy, morganm71@gmail.com
 


112. Symposium/Forum: 8:00 AM–8:50 AM  
Marquette

Measurement Equivalence of Personality and Leadership on Four Continents

Organizations and researchers should assess measurement equivalence before interpreting scores from different groups. This session presents 3 substantive studies that use IRT and structural equations approaches to measurement equivalence in personality and leadership areas.

Konstantin Cigularov, Old Dominion University, Co-Chair

Liwen Liu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Co-Chair

Liwen Liu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Sam Gosling, University of Texas-
Austin, Jeff Potter, Atof Inc., Measurement Equivalence of Extraversion Across Four Countries

Konstantin Cigularov, Old Dominion University, George C. Thornton, Colorado State University, Achievement Motivation in Bulgaria and United States: Cross-Country Comparison

Roya Ayman, Illinois Institute of Technology, Jialin Huang, Illinois Institute of Technology, Alan D. Mead, Illinois Institute of Technology, Afshin Bassari, Bahá’i Institute of Higher Education, Implicit Theories of “Leader” and “Boss” in Iran

Fritz Drasgow, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Discussant

Submitter: Konstantin Cigularov, kcigular@odu.edu
 


113. Symposium/Forum: 8:00 AM–8:50 AM  
Northwest 1

Hell Is Other People: Exploring Social Influences on Working Parents

Work–family research has largely viewed other people within the workplace and family merely as sources for support or demand. Researchers within this symposium will take a more complex view of the role of others by considering the impact of attributions, stereotypes, and social interactions on working parents.

Elizabeth M. Poposki, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Chair
Tyler G. Okimoto, Yale University, Madeline E. Heilman, New York University, Psychological Processes Underlying the “Bad Parent” Assumption Regarding Working Mothers

Jamie Ladge, Northeastern University, Danna Greenberg, Babson College, Becoming a Working Mother: Identity, Efficacy, and Resocialization Following Reentry

Submitter: Elizabeth Poposki, epoposki@iupui.edu
 


114. Symposium/Forum: 8:00 AM–9:20 AM  
Northwest 5

Statistical and Methodological Myths and Urban Legends: Part VI

This symposium presents 4 statistical and methodological myths and urban legends that have not been discussed previously with the intent of (a) uncovering the kernel of truth and myths supporting them and (b) providing more informed bases for their application in the organizational sciences.

Charles E. Lance, University of Georgia, Co-Chair

Robert J. Vandenberg, University of Georgia, Co-Chair

Dan J. Putka, HumRRO, Frederick L. Oswald, Rice University, Richard P. DeShon, Michigan State University, WYSIWYG: Weight, That’s Not Right!

Robert E. Ployhart, University of South Carolina, William I. MacKenzie, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Two Waves of Measurement Do Not a Longitudinal Study Make

Charleen P. Maher, University of Georgia, Charles E. Lance, University of Georgia, “Independent” Measurement Does Not Automatically Solve the Shared Method Problem

Dev K. Dalal, Bowling Green State University, Michael J. Zickar, Bowling Green State University, Understanding What Centering Does and Doesn’t Do in Multiple Regression

Submitter: Charles Lance, clance@uga.edu
 


115. Symposium/Forum: 8:00 AM–9:20 AM  
Waldorf

Beyond Fairness: Technology and Applicant Reactions in the 21st Century

The majority of applicant reactions studies examine reactions through the lens of fairness. This symposium presents 4 studies that extend beyond fairness and focus on the dynamic nature of reactions, featuring investigations into the changing nature of reactions over time and context, and strategies for minimizing negative reactions in applicants.

Kyle G. Mack, Portland State University, Co-Chair

Donald M. Truxillo, Portland State University, Co-Chair

Gary Giumetti, Clemson University, Evan F. Sinar, Development Dimensions International (DDI), Location, Location, Location: Why Environments Matter for Remote Internet Testing

Autumn D. Krauss, Kronos Talent Management Division, Donald M. Truxillo, Portland State University, Talya N. Bauer, Portland State University, Kyle G. Mack, Portland State
University, Development and Evaluation of an Applicant Explanation Typology

R. Blake Jelley, University of Prince Edward Island, Julie M. McCarthy, University of Toronto, Examination of a Strategy for Improving Candidate Test-Taking Reactions

Kyle G. Mack, Portland State University, Donald M. Truxillo, Portland State University, Talya N. Bauer, Portland State University, Todd Bodner, Portland State University, I Didn’t Want That Job Anyway: Performance and Applicant Motivation

Michael A. Campion, Purdue University, Discussant

Submitter: Kyle Mack, kyle.mack@gmail.com
 


116. Panel Discussion: 8:00 AM–9:50 AM  
Williford A

Conducting KSAO and Competency-Based Job Analyses: Advice From the Field

KSAOs and competencies are common outputs from a job analysis. Whereas previous discussions have focused on establishing which practice is better, our discussion will focus on the relationship between the 2 concepts and utilizing both models in practice. Panelists will discuss best practices, legal considerations, and their applied experiences.

Hailey A. Herleman, Kenexa, Chair

Sarah N. Gilbert, American Institutes for Research, Co-Chair

Kenneth Pearlman, Independent Consultant, Panelist

Eric M. Dunleavy, DCI Consulting Group, Panelist

Theodore L. Hayes, U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Panelist

Cheryl Hendrickson, American Institutes for Research, Panelist

Suzanne Tsacoumis, HumRRO, Panelist

Submitter: Hailey Herleman, hailey.herleman@kenexa.com
 


117. Panel Discussion: 8:00 AM–9:20 AM  
Williford B

Reject, Revise, Resubmit: Editors’ Tips for Responding to Journal Reviews

This session assembles editors and editorial board members of top-tier journals for a panel on addressing reviewers’ comments in journal reviews. Panelists will answer questions about how to maximize the chances of a successful revision, and attendees will be given the opportunity to ask questions related to the review process.

Kathi N. Miner-Rubino, Texas A&M University, Chair

Karl Aquino, University of British Columbia, Panelist

Jason A. Colquitt, University of Florida, Panelist

Lillian T. Eby, University of Georgia, Panelist

Anne M. O’Leary-Kelly, University of Arkansas, Panelist

Quinetta M. Roberson, Villanova University, Panelist

Submitter: Kathi Miner-Rubino, kminer-rubino@tamu.edu
 


118. Symposium/Forum: 8:00 AM–9:20 AM  
Williford C

ROI in Retail: Innovating How Effectiveness Is Measured

The retail industry provides a variety of opportunities for I-O psychologists. With every new initiative, I-Os need to be prepared to demonstrate the return on investment of their work. This symposium explores innovation and advancements in the ways I-Os can measure, document, and increase ROI in retail organizations.

Megan K. Leasher, Macy’s, Inc., Chair

Megan K. Leasher, Macy’s, Inc., Time to Hire in Macy’s Stores: Opportunities to Increase ROI

Patrick K. Hyland, Sirota Survey Intelligence, Jim Catalano, Tiffany & Company, Shujing Huang, Virginia Tech, Building Service Climates at Tiffany & Company: Managers’
Psychological State

Corey E. Miller, Wright State University, Jason D. Culbertson, Wright State University, Jenna N. Filipkowski, Wright State University, Suzanne L. Dean, Wright State University, Analyzing the Validity of 360-Degree Feedback in a Retail Environment

John M. McKee, Service Management Group, Mitchell W. Gold, Pivotal Talent, LLC, Rethinking the Service-Profit Chain: Employee Engagement, Customer Satisfaction, and Financial Performance

Jason E. Taylor, PeopleAnswers, Inc., Discussant

Submitter: Megan Leasher, megan.leasher@macys.com
 


119. Community of Interest: 8:30 AM–9:50 AM  
PDR 2

Virtual Teams

Timothy M. Franz, St. John Fisher College, Host

Stephen J. Zaccaro, George Mason University, Host

Laurel A. McNall, SUNY Brockport, Coordinator
 


120. Special Events: 9:00 AM–9:50 AM  
Joliet

Improving SIOP’s Advocacy Efforts

Let’s use our collective voice through SIOP’s new External Relations Committee! The ERC is establishing relationships with other organizations and developing strategies to effectively use the resources provided by organizations (APA, APS, FABBS) paid through our dues to provide advocacy support. Representatives from allied organizations (e.g., SHRM, ATP, HRES) will be invited to participate in the discussion.

Deirdre J. Knapp, HumRRO, Chair

Debra A. Major, Old Dominion University, Panelist

Dianne Brown Maranto, National Security Agency, Panelist

Submitter: Deirdre Knapp, dknapp@humrro.org
 


121. Special Events: 9:00 AM–9:50 AM  
Lake Erie

I-O Psychology in Italy

Benvenuti a tutti! This panel discussion highlights I-O psychology in Italy. Four distinguished panelists represent academia, industry, and consulting. They will share with the audience their personal backgrounds and academic and work histories, and what prepared them for their current roles as I-O professionals in Italy. In this question-and-answer session there will be opportunity for audience interaction.

Mariangela Battista, Pfizer Inc., Chair

Laura Borgogni, University of Rome, Panelist

Mario DiLoreto, Barilla Group, Panelist

Ornella Chinotti, SHL Italy, Panelist

Submitter: Mariangela Battista, mariangela.battista@pfizer.com
 


122. Roundtable Discussion/Conversation Hour: 9:00 AM–9:50 AM  
Lake Huron

The People Side of Mergers

Two experts—a senior I-O from a Global 50 company and the CEO of a large global human capital consulting firm going through a merger—will host an open discussion of the people-related challenges that arise in merger situations and productive approaches for addressing those potential derailers.

Seymour Adler, Aon Consulting, Host

Patricia R. Pedigo, IBM, Host

Kathryn Hayley, Aon Hewitt, Host

Submitter: Seymour Adler, Seymour_Adler@Aon.com
 


123. Panel Discussion: 9:00 AM–9:50 AM  
Marquette

Multimedia Simulations: Types, Fidelity, and Challenges

In the last 2 decades, movement towards automating the delivery and scoring of job-focused simulations has emerged. Multimedia simulations are varied, and an organizing framework is needed. Panelists will show simulation examples to highlight various ways multimedia is incorporated into today’s simulations. Innovations in development and validation will be shared.

Kathleen A. Tuzinski, PreVisor, Chair

Paul R. Bernthal, Development Dimensions International, Panelist

Matthew S. O’Connell, Select International, Inc., Panelist

Dave Pucel, Performance Training Systems, Inc., Panelist

Christina R. Van Landuyt, FurstPerson, Inc., Panelist

Submitter: Kathleen Tuzinski, ktuzinski@gmail.com
 


124. Panel Discussion: 9:00 AM–9:50 AM  
Northwest 1

I-O and IT: How to Effectively Navigate the Nexus

Applied practice drives the need for I-O psychologists to deliver solutions using sophisticated information technology (IT) systems. However, few I-O and IT practitioners are prepared for working jointly to ensure successful delivery. This panel provides recommendations for driving success in projects requiring technical and technological focus.

James H. Killian, Chally, Co-Chair

Matthew J. Such, First Advantage, Co-Chair

Stephanie R. Klein, PreVisor, Inc., Panelist

Douglas H. Reynolds, Development Dimensions International (DDI), Panelist

Jeffrey M. Stanton, Syracuse University, Panelist

KD Zaldivar, Shell Oil, Panelist

Submitter: James Killian, jameskillian@chally.com
 


125. Posters: 9:00 AM–9:50 AM  
SE Exhibit Hall

Training

125-1 Toward Computer-Adaptive Training: Modeling Simulator Performance Using Item Response Theory

This study was conducted to determine whether the 2-parameter logistic model is appropriate for modeling prioritization performance in a scenario-based simulator. We assessed conformity to assumptions, parameter estimation, model-data fit, and measurement equivalence across both constrained and typical measurement conditions.

Matthew Lineberry, Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division

Gwendolyn Campbell, Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division

Charles P. R. Scott, Kaegan Corporation

Submitter: Matthew Lineberry, matthew.lineberry@navy.mil
 

125-2 Individual Differences Predicting Success in Video Game-Based Blended Learning

This study investigates learning outcomes from adult learners using a video game-based blended language training system. Trainee characteristics that could impact success in game-based blended learning were also investigated. Results showed multiple trainee characteristics were significantly related to variability in learning outcomes.

Milton V. Cahoon, SWA Consulting Inc.

Aaron Watson, SWA Consulting Inc.

Eric A. Surface, SWA Consulting Inc.

Erich C. Dierdorff, DePaul University

Submitter: Milton Cahoon, mcahoon@swa-consulting.com
 

125-3 Individual Learning in Team Training: Moderating Effects of Team Context

We examined individual-level learning processes and outcomes of team training. We found self-efficacy mediated the effects of metacognition on individual mastery of team-level training content. Using moderated-mediation analysis, we also found these indirect effects were moderated by 2 features of team context (overall team performance and quality of cooperation).

Erich C. Dierdorff, DePaul University

James Kemp Ellington, Illinois Institute of Technology

Submitter: Erich Dierdorff, edierdor@depaul.edu
 

125-4 Perceived Training Comprehensiveness and Organizational Commitment Across Eight Organizations

We draw on social exchange theory in examining the relationship between employee perceptions of training comprehensiveness and organizational commitment. Multilevel regression results support a direct relationship between training comprehensiveness and organizational commitment. However, whether individuals chose to participate in activities related to the training’s purpose moderated this relationship.

Kyle P. Ehrhardt, University of Wisconsin-Milwauke

Janice S. Miller, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Peter W. Hom, Arizona State University

Sarah Freeman, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Submitter: Kyle Ehrhardt, kpe@uwm.edu
 

125-5 Evaluating Advance Organizer Effective-ness in a Foreign Language Training Context

Pretraining interventions are designed to enhance learning during training by introducing activities or materials prior to training that can lead to increased posttraining outcomes. This study explored the effect of advance organizers, a type of pretraining intervention, on posttraining skill. Extent of advance organizer use significantly predicted posttraining language skill.

Sean M. Gasperson, North Carolina State University

Ryan B. Phillips, SWA Consulting Inc.

Aaron Watson, SWA Consulting Inc.

Eric A. Surface, SWA Consulting Inc.

Submitter: Sean Gasperson, smgasper@ncsu.edu
 

125-6 Learner-Controlled Practice Difficulty: The Roles of Cognitive and Motivational Processes

This study tested a causal model of how learner-controlled practice difficulty is linked to complex skill acquisition. Results showed that general mental ability and self-efficacy relate to learner-controlled difficulty, which in turn relates to task knowledge, posttraining performance, and adaptive performance directly and through the cognitive process of self-evaluation.

Michael G. Hughes, University of Oklahoma

Eric A. Day, University of Oklahoma

Xiaoqian Wang, Mobley Group Pacific Ltd.

Olivia Cooper, University of Oklahoma

Matthew L. Arsenault, University of Oklahoma

Lauren Harkrider, University of Oklahoma

Matthew J. Schuelke, Air Force Research Laboratory

Submitter: Michael Hughes, michael.g.hughes-1@ou.edu
 

125-7 A Job Club for Older Job Seekers: Why It Works

In response to the increasing number of older adults in the job market, research is needed to address job search interventions designed for this population. The study utilizes a longitudinal design to explore participant experience of 3-week group-based job search training on learning and attitudes/efficacy changes.

Yoshie Nakai, O.E. Strategies, Inc./University of Akron

Andrea F. Snell, University of Akron

Jared Z. Ferrell, University of Akron

Stephen Hill, University of Akron

Kimberly Hollman, University of Akron

Submitter: Yoshie Nakai, yn1@zips.uakron.edu
 

125-8 Understanding Virtual Team Communication Processes

This study was conducted in an attempt to increase the overall performance of virtual teams, as well as increasing computer-mediated communications between the team members. The LIWC is used to assess the types of training and the effect that training has on the content of team interaction.

Michael A. Neeper, University of Texas at Arlington

Shannon A. Scielzo, University of Texas at Arlington

Nicholas C. Davis, University of Texas at Arlington

Elena A. Radeva, University of Texas at Arlington

Submitter: Michael Neeper, michael.neeper@mavs.uta.edu
 

125-9 Effectiveness of the Internal Referencing Strategy Design for Training Evaluation

The internal referencing strategy (IRS) design extends the single group pretest–posttest design for training evaluation by adding control items that measure untrained content, which is often more practical than using a control group. A Monte Carlo simulation evaluated the conditions under which the IRS design is most effective.

Jonas Neuhengen, Illinois Institute of Technology

Konstantin Cigularov, Old Dominion University

Scott B. Morris, Illinois Institute of Technology

Submitter: Jonas Neuhengen, neuj@pdx.edu
 

125-10 Training Students to Increase Employment Opportunity Using Social Networking Web Sites

This study tested training effectiveness on job-seeking students’ social networking Web site (SNW) activities, so that SNWs can promote rather than hinder their employment prospects. Participants increased their intentions of changing the SNW profiles, mediated by their attitudes and subjective norms. Trainees’ higher motivation to learn led to greater intentions.

Brandon Saedi, California State University, Long Beach

Hannah-Hanh D. Nguyen, California State University, Long Beach

Submitter: Hannah-Hanh Nguyen, hnguyen@csulb.edu
 

125-11 The Role of Posttraining Performance Feedback on Trainer Ratings

This study explored the effect of trainees’ performance feedback on trainer ratings. Ratings were lower when given after performance feedback, and ratings were also affected by course difficulty and trainee performance. Results are explained through the self-serving bias and implications for training evaluation are discussed.

Alexandra Rechlin, Colorado State University

Eric A. Surface, SWA Consulting Inc.

Kurt Kraiger, Colorado State University

Submitter: Alexandra Rechlin, rechlin@rams.colostate.edu
 

125-12 Personality and Synchronicity Interaction Predicts Training Performance in Online Discussion

112 undergraduates completed a Big 5 and self-monitoring (SM) personality measure and then completed an Internet-based training program in which they were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 online discussion technologies. Openness to Experience and SM predict knowledge and retention test scores. Interaction with technology provides incremental validity.

Craig M. Reddock, Old Dominion University

Richard N. Landers, Old Dominion University

Submitter: Craig Reddock, cmreddock@gmail.com
 

125-13 Houston, We Have a Problem-Solving Model for Training

Like many organizations, NASA has a business need to efficiently train new employees to effectively handle a variety of complex situations. We describe how a model of problem solving for flight controllers was built and how such a process could be used to improve training in similar operational environments.

Lacey L. Schmidt, EASI/Wyle Labs-NASA JSC

Kelley J. Slack, Wyle Life Sciences/LZ Technology, Inc.

Kathryn Keeton, EASI/Wyle Labs-NASA JSC

Immanuel Barshi, NASA Ames Research Center

Lynne H. Martin, NASA Ames Research Center

Robert Mauro, Decision Research

William S. O’Keefe, United Space Alliance LLC

Therese M. Huning, United Space Alliance LLC

Submitter: Lacey Schmidt, Lschmidt@wylehou.com
 

125-14 Complex Skill Acquisition Ability–Growth Interactions: A Spline-Modeling Approach

While controlling for past acquisition, this study modeled the changing contributions over time of 3 abilities toward complex skill acquisition for a relatively closed but complex and inconsistent task. Results indicated that the contributions of abilities toward skill acquisition may not be as dynamic as previous theory might suggest.

Matthew J. Schuelke, Air Force Research Laboratory

Eric A. Day, University of Oklahoma

Robert Terry, University of Oklahoma

Submitter: Matthew Schuelke, matthew.schuelke.ctr@wpafb.af.mil
 

125-15 General Mental Ability Moderates the Relationship Between Performance and Efficacy

The objective of this study was to investigate the role of team performance and individual mental ability on individuals’ perceptions of self- and team efficacy. Specifically, the way individuals process performance experiences may differ based on general mental ability, and this may have implications for team training.

Ira Schurig, Texas A&M University

Steven Jarrett, Texas A&M University

Ryan M. Glaze, Texas A&M University

Winfred Arthur, Texas A&M University

Winston Bennett, Training Research Laboratory

Submitter: Ira Schurig, iraschurig@yahoo.com
 

125-16 The Effectiveness of After-Action Reviews as a Training Method

The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of after-action reviews as a training method. A meta-analysis of the extant literature revealed that after-action reviews are a fairly effective technique but may have different effects on individual and team training.

Ira Schurig, Texas A&M University

Steven Jarrett, Texas A&M University

Winfred Arthur, Texas A&M University

Ryan M. Glaze, Texas A&M University

Margaret Schurig, College Station, TX

Submitter: Ira Schurig, iraschurig@yahoo.com
 

125-17 Disentangling the Unique Effects of Team Dimensional Training’s Design Elements

Twenty-seven teams participated in a study designed to evaluate the effects of 5 elements of team dimensional training (TDT) on 3 learning outcomes: taskwork skills, teamwork mental model accuracy, and transactive memory system utilization. Results indicate that each element of TDT contributed uniquely to 1 or more of these outcomes.

Mary J. Sierra, University of Central Florida

Kimberly A. Smith-Jentsch, University of Central Florida

Dorothy R. Carter-Berenson, University of Central Florida

Sallie J. Weaver, University of Central Florida

Wendy L. Bedwell, University of Central Florida

Submitter: Mary Jane Sierra, maryjane@knights.ucf.edu
 

125-18 Investigating Predictive Validity of Core Self-Evaluations in a Training Context

Core self-evaluations (CSE) predicted variance in job-related foreign language training outcomes, including utility reactions, metacognition, posttraining self-efficacy, and transfer intentions. In addition, CSE provided incremental prediction above and beyond that of cognitive ability and motivation for metacognition, posttraining self-efficacy, and transfer intentions. Findings demonstrate the potential value of CSE in training contexts.

Daniel S. Stanhope, North Carolina State University

Samuel B. Pond, North Carolina State University

Eric A. Surface, SWA Consulting Inc.

Submitter: Daniel Stanhope, danstan06@gmail.com
 

125-19 A Process Model of Error-Management Training Effects on Performance

We examined a process model of error management effects on performance on a course scheduling task (N = 168). Structural equation modeling provided support for the hypothesized model, indicating that metacognition, self-efficacy, and subjective task complexity mediate the effects of error management training on performance quality (errors) and quantity (schedules).

Debra Steele-Johnson, Wright State University

Zach Kalinoski, Wright State University

Submitter: Debra Steele-Johnson, debra.steele-johnson@wright.edu
 

125-20 Differential Ability and Complexity Effects: Performance, Self-Efficacy, Cognitive Appraisals

We proposed a multilevel model of differential effects of ability and task complexity (objective and subjective) on the outcomes of performance, self-efficacy, and cognitive appraisals. Results indicated that ability and objective task complexity relate more strongly to performance and self-efficacy whereas subjective task complexity relates more strongly to cognitive appraisals.

Julie A. Steinke, Wright State University

Debra Steele-Johnson, Wright State University

Zach Kalinoski, Wright State University

Submitter: Julie Steinke, steinke.27@wright.edu
 

125-21 Critical Social Thinking Training: A Framework for Design and Delivery

There is a need to train critical social thinking skills in order to improve cognitive and social reasoning, enhance performance, and ultimately result in better outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to provide researchers and practitioners with a framework for designing and implementing critical social thinking training interventions.

Amanda L. Thayer, University of Central Florida

Rebecca Grossman, University of Central Florida

Marissa L. Shuffler, University of Central Florida

Shawn Burke, University of Central Florida

Eduardo Salas, University of Central Florida

Submitter: Amanda Thayer, athayer@ist.ucf.edu
 

125-22 Individual Adaptability Incrementally Predicts Performance in a Dynamic Training Environment

Utilizing Ployhart & Bliese’s individual ADAPTability (I-ADAPT) theory, we assessed 69 U.S. Army lieutenants completing training on a dynamic performance task. I-ADAPT was related to training performance. Furthermore, I-ADAPT accounted for incremental variance above cognitive ability and self-efficacy. Surprisingly, there was no significant relationship between I-ADAPT and cognitive ability.

E. Daly Vaughn, Auburn University

Jennifer S. Tucker, Army Research Institute

Robert J. Pleban, U.S. Army Research Institute

Submitter: E. Vaughn, dalyvaughn@gmail.com
 

125-23 The Expert-Led After-Action Review Training Approach: An Empirical Test

We examined the effectiveness of an expert-led after-action review (AAR) versus a non-AAR team training approach. Teams trained using expert-led AARs attained higher team performance, reported higher team efficacy, and were better able to adapt their performance than teams trained with an AAR.

Anton J. Villado, Rice University

C. Pamela Cosio, Rice University

Claire E. Pawlik, Rice University

Alisa Yu, Rice University

Punya O. Narain, Rice University

Anna C. Baron, Rice University

Submitter: Anton Villado, antonvillado@rice.edu
 

125-19 A Process Model of Error-Management Training Effects on Performance

We examined a process model of error management effects on performance on a course scheduling task (N = 168). Structural equation modeling provided support for the hypothesized model, indicating that metacognition, self-efficacy, and subjective task complexity mediate the effects of error management training on performance quality (errors) and quantity (schedules).

Debra Steele-Johnson, Wright State University

Zach Kalinoski, Wright State University

Submitter: Debra Steele-Johnson, debra.steele-johnson@wright.edu
 

125-20 Differential Ability and Complexity Effects: Performance, Self-Efficacy, Cognitive Appraisals

We proposed a multilevel model of differential effects of ability and task complexity (objective and subjective) on the outcomes of performance, self-efficacy, and cognitive appraisals. Results indicated that ability and objective task complexity relate more strongly to performance and self-efficacy whereas subjective task complexity relates more strongly to cognitive appraisals.

Julie A. Steinke, Wright State University

Debra Steele-Johnson, Wright State University

Zach Kalinoski, Wright State University

Submitter: Julie Steinke, steinke.27@wright.edu
 

125-21 Critical Social Thinking Training: A Framework for Design and Delivery

There is a need to train critical social thinking skills in order to improve cognitive and social reasoning, enhance performance, and ultimately result in better outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to provide researchers and practitioners with a framework for designing and implementing critical social thinking training interventions.

Amanda L. Thayer, University of Central Florida

Rebecca Grossman, University of Central Florida

Marissa L. Shuffler, University of Central Florida

Shawn Burke, University of Central Florida

Eduardo Salas, University of Central Florida

Submitter: Amanda Thayer, athayer@ist.ucf.edu
 

125-22 Individual Adaptability Incrementally Predicts Performance in a Dynamic Training Environment

Utilizing Ployhart & Bliese’s individual ADAPTability (I-ADAPT) theory, we assessed 69 U.S. Army lieutenants completing training on a dynamic performance task. I-ADAPT was related to training performance. Furthermore, I-ADAPT accounted for incremental variance above cognitive ability and self-efficacy. Surprisingly, there was no significant relationship between I-ADAPT and cognitive ability.

E. Daly Vaughn, Auburn University

Jennifer S. Tucker, Army Research Institute

Robert J. Pleban, U.S. Army Research Institute

Submitter: E. Vaughn, dalyvaughn@gmail.com
 

125-23 The Expert-Led After-Action Review Training Approach: An Empirical Test

We examined the effectiveness of an expert-led after-action review (AAR) versus a non-AAR team training approach. Teams trained using expert-led AARs attained higher team performance, reported higher team efficacy, and were better able to adapt their performance than teams trained with an AAR.

Anton J. Villado, Rice University

C. Pamela Cosio, Rice University

Claire E. Pawlik, Rice University

Alisa Yu, Rice University

Punya O. Narain, Rice University

Anna C. Baron, Rice University

Submitter: Anton Villado, antonvillado@rice.edu
 

125-19 A Process Model of Error-Management Training Effects on Performance

We examined a process model of error management effects on performance on a course scheduling task (N = 168). Structural equation modeling provided support for the hypothesized model, indicating that metacognition, self-efficacy, and subjective task complexity mediate the effects of error management training on performance quality (errors) and quantity (schedules).

Debra Steele-Johnson, Wright State University

Zach Kalinoski, Wright State University

Submitter: Debra Steele-Johnson, debra.steele-johnson@wright.edu
 

125-20 Differential Ability and Complexity Effects: Performance, Self-Efficacy, Cognitive Appraisals

We proposed a multilevel model of differential effects of ability and task complexity (objective and subjective) on the outcomes of performance, self-efficacy, and cognitive appraisals. Results indicated that ability and objective task complexity relate more strongly to performance and self-efficacy whereas subjective task complexity relates more strongly to cognitive appraisals.

Julie A. Steinke, Wright State University

Debra Steele-Johnson, Wright State University

Zach Kalinoski, Wright State University

Submitter: Julie Steinke, steinke.27@wright.edu
 

125-21 Critical Social Thinking Training: A Framework for Design and Delivery

There is a need to train critical social thinking skills in order to improve cognitive and social reasoning, enhance performance, and ultimately result in better outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to provide researchers and practitioners with a framework for designing and implementing critical social thinking training interventions.

Amanda L. Thayer, University of Central Florida

Rebecca Grossman, University of Central Florida

Marissa L. Shuffler, University of Central Florida

Shawn Burke, University of Central Florida

Eduardo Salas, University of Central Florida

Submitter: Amanda Thayer, athayer@ist.ucf.edu
 

125-22 Individual Adaptability Incrementally Predicts Performance in a Dynamic Training Environment

Utilizing Ployhart & Bliese’s individual ADAPTability (I-ADAPT) theory, we assessed 69 U.S. Army lieutenants completing training on a dynamic performance task. I-ADAPT was related to training performance. Furthermore, I-ADAPT accounted for incremental variance above cognitive ability and self-efficacy. Surprisingly, there was no significant relationship between I-ADAPT and cognitive ability.

E. Daly Vaughn, Auburn University

Jennifer S. Tucker, Army Research Institute

Robert J. Pleban, U.S. Army Research Institute

Submitter: E. Vaughn, dalyvaughn@gmail.com
 

125-23 The Expert-Led After-Action Review Training Approach: An Empirical Test

We examined the effectiveness of an expert-led after-action review (AAR) versus a non-AAR team training approach. Teams trained using expert-led AARs attained higher team performance, reported higher team efficacy, and were better able to adapt their performance than teams trained with an AAR.

Anton J. Villado, Rice University

C. Pamela Cosio, Rice University

Claire E. Pawlik, Rice University

Alisa Yu, Rice University

Punya O. Narain, Rice University

Anna C. Baron, Rice University

Submitter: Anton Villado, antonvillado@rice.edu
 

125-24 Factors Influencing Knowledge and Skill Decay in Training: A Meta-Analysis

This meta-analysis integrated 111 datapoints from 38 reports that investigated organizationally relevant training in relation to knowledge and skill decay. Results indicated that decay effects vary in size depending on not only the length of nonuse but, more importantly, depending on several methodological and task-related factors.

Xiaoqian Wang, Mobley Group Pacific Ltd.

Eric A. Day, University of Oklahoma

Vanessa K. Kowollik, Kenexa

Matthew J. Schuelke, Air Force Research Laboratory

Michael G. Hughes, University of Oklahoma

Submitter: Xiaoqian Wang, xiaoqian109@yahoo.com.cn
 

125-25 Cognitive and Motivational Influences on Training Performance: A Longitudinal Study

This longitudinal study examined who recovers from poor initial training performance. Military personnel (N = 578) completed a 4–6 month language training program. Early training performance was a function of cognitive ability. Ultimate skill acquisition was predicted by a complex mixture of cognitive ability, motivation to train, and early training performance.

Aaron Watson, SWA Consulting Inc.

Lori Foster Thompson, North Carolina State University

Eric A. Surface, SWA Consulting Inc.

Submitter: Aaron Watson, awatson@swa-consulting.com
 

125-26 Supervisor Support and Utility Reactions: Trainee Attitudes as a Mediator

This study examined the relationships among supervisor support for training, trainee attitudes toward training in general, and utility reactions. We found that supervisor support predicted both trainee attitudes and utility reactions and that attitudes fully mediated the relationship between supervisor support and utility reactions. A proposed model is discussed.

Christina L. Wilson, Colorado State University

Michele C. Baranczyk, Kutztown University

Susan Adams, DCP Midstream

Submitter: Christina Wilson, clwilson@lamar.colostate.edu
 


126. Panel Discussion: 9:30 AM–10:20 AM  
Williford B

International Leadership Development Through the Use of Personality Assessments

Psychologists, consultants, and test publishers have made great strides in translating, adapting, and encouraging the international use of assessments for leadership development. In this session, panelists representing major global test publishers will discuss how their assessments are used for leadership development in foreign countries and the challenges they encounter.

Michael L. Morris, CPP, Inc., Chair

Sarita Bhakuni, Self-employed, Panelist

Robert E. McHenry, OPP Ltd, Panelist

Kevin D. Meyer, Hogan Assessment Systems, Panelist

Patrick L. Wadlington, Birkman International, Inc., Panelist

Submitter: Michael Morris, michael.lynn.morris@gmail.com


127. Panel Discussion: 9:30 AM–10:20 AM  
Williford C

Selection via Smart Phone/Mobile Devices: Is I-O Psychology Ready?

Technology is shifting from the use of PCs/Internet to smart phones/mobile devices. Organizations want to use these devices to reach potential applicants quickly. This panel will include perspectives from academia, practice, and technology to explore the advantages and challenges of using smart phones/mobile devices for personnel selection.

Sarah S. Fallaw, PreVisor, Co-Chair

Jennifer Mattocks, PreVisor, Co-Chair

Fritz Drasgow, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Panelist

Ben Hawkes, Kenexa, Panelist

Debora D. Mitchell, Sprint, Panelist

Nathan J. Mondragon, Taleo, Panelist

Submitter: Sarah Fallaw, sfallaw@previsor.com
 


128. Friday Seminars: 10:00 AM–1:00 PM  
Williford A

Earn 3 CE credits for attending. Preregistration required.

Organizational Research and Grant Funding: Challenges, Benefits, and Opportunities
 

his seminar will focus on various key issues in the process of applying for grant funding. Specifically, the 3 presenters with expertise in different areas will discuss how to identify funding opportunities most appropriate for I-O psychologists and what strategies to use for different stages of developing grant applications.

Leslie B. Hammer, Portland State University, Presenter

Thomas F. Hilton, National Institute on Drug Abuse/NIH, Presenter

Keith James, Portland State University, Presenter

L. Casey Chosewood, National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Presenter

Michael T. Ford, University at Albany, SUNY, Coordinator

Submitter: Michael Ford, mford@albany.edu
 


129. Symposium/Forum: 10:30 AM–11:50 AM  
Boulevard AB

The Greater Good: How I-O Is Making a Difference

This symposium brings together 4 distinct presenters who are working on projects whose primary goal is to make a difference in the world around them. Presenters will share how I-O principles and methodologies were instrumental in the success of these projects and in improving both local and global communities.

Christine E. Corbet, Aon Hewitt, Co-Chair

Kathy MacKay, Aon Hewitt, Co-Chair

Sean Cruse, United Nations Global Compact, I-O at the UN: Global Compact in Advancing CSR Worldwide

Amy Dawgert Grubb, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Leading in the FBI: Evolutionary and Revolutionary Change

Jane Homeyer, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Ann M. Quigley, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Transforming the Intelligence Community: Using Capabilities to Ensure “Right” Workforce

Patti MacLeod, Indian Affairs, Lorraine C. Stomski, Aon Hewitt, Recruiting Top Talent and Indian Affairs: I-O Makes a Difference

Submitter: Kathy MacKay, kdmackay@verizon.net
 


130. Symposium/Forum: 10:30 AM–11:50 AM  
Boulevard C

New Developments in Abusive Supervision Research

Abusive supervision is a pervasive and costly problem. Many advances have been made to explore why supervisors abuse subordinates, but more research is needed to fully understand its impact. This symposium addresses this issue and presents 4 theoretically driven papers that investigate antecedents, consequences, and boundary effects of abusive supervision.

Jenny M. Hoobler, University of Illinois at Chicago, Co-Chair

Marie S. Mitchell, University of Georgia, Co-Chair

Marie S. Mitchell, University of Georgia, Fred Walumbwa, Arizona State University, An Investigation of Why Supervisors Support and Abuse Subordinates

Katherine N. Alexander, Bowling Green State University, Charlotte Fritz, Portland State University, Steve M. Jex, Bowling Green State University, Retaliating Against Abusive Supervision in Formal Work Environments

James Burton, Northern Illinois University, Jenny M. Hoobler, University of Illinois at Chicago, Melinda L. Scheuer, Northern Illinois University, Blaming the Abusive Boss: How Locus of Control Influences Aggression

Huiwen Lian, University of Waterloo, Jeffrey Spence, University of Guelph, Lance Ferris, Singapore Management University, Douglas J. Brown, University of Waterloo, Subordinate Narcissism and Abusive Supervision: Deviant Reactions to Power Loss

Bennett J. Tepper, Georgia State University, Discussant

Submitter: Marie Mitchell, msmitche@terry.uga.edu


131. Symposium/Forum: 10:30 AM–11:50 AM  
Continental A

Managing Multiteam Systems: Theoretical and Empirical Advances

Organizations increasingly adopt multiteam systems (MTSs), and knowing how to manage multiple teams is critical. However, to date, the majority of studies have focused on the effectiveness of teams in general rather than issues on managing sets of teams. This symposium presents innovative work examining the issue of managing MTSs.

Guihyun Park, Singapore Management University, Co-Chair

Richard P. DeShon, Michigan State University, Co-Chair

Toshio Murase, University of Central Florida, Daniel Doty, University of Central Florida, Leslie A. DeChurch, University of Central Florida, Corey Lugo, University of Central Florida, Toward a Taxonomy of Multiteam Perspectives

Shawn Burke, University of Central Florida, Deborah DiazGranados, University of Central Florida, Leslie A. DeChurch, University of Central Florida, Eduardo Salas, University of Central Florida, Looking at Goal Conflict in Multiteam Systems: An Empirical Investigation

Guihyun Park, Singapore Management University, Richard P. DeShon, Michigan State University, The Effect of Different Team Discussion Styles on Interteam Cooperation

Kimberly A. Smith-Jentsch, University of Central Florida, Mary J. Sierra, University of Central Florida, Sallie J. Weaver, University of Central Florida, Wendy L. Bedwell, University of Central Florida, Eduardo Salas, University of Central Florida, Training Multiteam Systems to Self-Correct

Daniel R. Ilgen, Michigan State University, Discussant

Submitter: Guihyun Park, parkguih@gmail.com
 


132. Symposium/Forum: 10:30 AM–11:50 AM  
Continental B

Researching Outside the Box: Exploring Work– Family Research Beyond Cross-Sectional Approaches

This symposium consists of 4 papers that empirically explore work–family issues using nontraditional methodologies, including experimental designs in laboratory settings, a daily diary approach, and a between-subjects lagged design in a field setting. Presenters will showcase their methodology, highlight its relevance for their particular research question, and discuss lessons learned.

Ann H. Huffman, Northern Arizona University, Co-Chair

Satoris S. Culbertson, Kansas State University, Co-Chair

Satoris S. Culbertson, Kansas State University, Ann H. Huffman, Northern Arizona University, Using Experimental Design to Understand Work–Family Conflict

Julie Wayne, Wake Forest University, Wendy J. Casper, University of Texas at Arlington, Do Claims of Excellence in Work–Life Efforts Influence Applicant Attraction?

Bettina S. Wiese, Free University of Berlin (Germany), Alexandra M. Freund, University of Zurich, Day-to-Day Ruminations About Work When Being at Home

Russell A. Matthews, Louisiana State University, The Importance of Temporal Lags in Longitudinal Work–Family Research

Submitter: Ann Huffman, ann.huffman@nau.edu


133. Symposium/Forum: 10:30 AM–11:50 AM  
Continental C

Perceived Organizational Support: Current Knowledge, Future Promise

Since perceived organizational support (POS) was first investigated 25 years ago, research on the topic has progressively increased, resulting in over 350 studies. This symposium addresses the needs to analyze and organize current findings about POS, considers gaps in knowledge, and suggests promising lines of future research.


Robert Eisenberger, University of Houston, Chair

Robert Eisenberger, University of Houston, How Perceived Organizational Support Works

Louis C. Buffardi, George Mason University, James N. Kurtessis, George Mason University/American Institutes for Research, Kathy Stewart, Fields Consulting Group, Michael T. Ford, University at Albany, SUNY, Cory Adis, George Mason University, Twenty-Five Years of Perceived Organizational Support: A Literature Review

Lynn M. Shore, San Diego State University, Jacqueline A-M Coyle-Shapiro, London School of Economics and Political Sciences, What Else Should Be Learned About Perceived Organizational Support?

Linda R. Shanock, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Benjamin E. Baran, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Lindsay R Miller, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Advancing Organizational Support Theory Into the 21st-Century World of Work

L. A. Witt, University of Houston, Discussant

Submitter: Robert Eisenberger, reisenberger2@uh.edu


134. Symposium/Forum: 10:30 AM–12:20 PM  
International Ballroom South

Manager, Know Thyself! A Closer Look at Self-Awareness

Most models of self-management, leadership effectiveness, and management development begin with self-awareness, but much remains to be learned about this concept. Papers presented in this session address lingering questions such as, how does self-awareness relate to other constructs? What predicts it? How does self-awareness influence learning and performance?

Richard J. Klimoski, George Mason University, Co-Chair

Kenneth G. Brown, University of Iowa, Co-Chair

Richard J. Klimoski, George Mason University, What Is Self-Awareness?

Traci Sitzmann, University of Colorado, Denver, When Is Ignorance Bliss? Effects of Inaccurate Self-Assessments of Knowledge

Paul E. Tesluk, University of Maryland, Examining Antecedents and Outcomes of Self-Awareness in Executive Coaching

David S. DeGeest, University of Iowa, Justin C. Abdel Khalik, University of Iowa, Kenneth G. Brown, University of Iowa, Self-Awareness in the Management Development Literature

Michelle A. Marks, George Mason University School of Management, Discussant

Kenneth N. Wexley, Wexley Consulting, HRD, Discussant

Submitter: Kenneth Brown, kenneth-g-brown@uiowa.edu
 


135. Special Events: 10:30 AM–11:20 AM  
Joliet

Fact and Fiction: Licensing Barriers and Resources

This open discussion session begins with a brief overview: the purpose/goals of the State Affairs Committee, a history of I-O licensing issues, facts and misconceptions, and information/resources for those who pursue licensure. Emphasis will be placed on eliminating barriers for I-O people seeking licensure.

M. Peter Scontrino, Scontrino-Powell Organizational Psychologists, Co-Chair

Greg Gormanous, Self-employed, Co-Chair

Submitter: M. Peter Scontrino, peter@scontrino-powell.com
 


136. Special Events: 10:30 AM–11:20 AM  
Lake Erie

Special Address by Norbert K. Semmer: Occupational Health Psychology: The “Stress-as-Offense-to-Self” (SOS) Perspective

Focusing on experiences that threaten, or affirm, one’s self has opened new research avenues, such as the specific implications of failure (versus other stressful experiences) for well-being, and has fostered the development of new constructs, such as illegitimate tasks.
I will present the approach, its implications, and research examples.

Eduardo Salas, University of Central Florida, Chair

Norbert K. Semmer, University of Bern, Presenter

Submitter: Mariangela Battista, mariangela.battista@pfizer.com
 


137. Roundtable Discussion/Conversation Hour: 10:30 AM–11:50 AM  
Lake Huron

Lost in Translation: Early Practitioners Tell All

The roundtable/conversation hour proposed here will bring together members of SIOP who consider themselves to be early practitioners. We expect a stimulating exchange over issues relevant to an early practitioner community, such as earnestly applying our training to our practice and successfully adjusting to novel challenges and demands.

Sumona B. De Graaf, George Washington University, Host

Justin G. Black, CUNY-Baruch College/Sirota Survey Intelligence, Host

Submitter: Sumona De Graaf, sumonaatgw@gmail.com
 


138. Panel Discussion: 10:30 AM–11:50 AM  
Lake Michigan

Maximizing the Contribution of Subject-Matter Experts in Job Analysis

I-O psychologists rely heavily on subject-matter experts in job analysis research. However, little is known about how to maximize their contribution. This panel discussion seeks the expert opinion of researchers regarding the challenges associated with procuring the most appropriate experts and various strategies for maximizing their input.

Kelley J. Krokos, American Institutes for Research, Chair

Dana M. Glenn-Dunleavy, Association of American Medical Colleges, Panelist

Scott A. Davies, Walden University, Panelist

Patrick Gavan O’Shea, Human Resources Research Organization, Panelist

Dwayne G. Norris, American Institutes for Research, Panelist

Submitter: Kelley Krokos, kkrokos@air.org
 


139. Panel Discussion: 10:30 AM–11:50 AM  
Lake Ontario

Leveraging Experiential Learning to Build Capability and Accelerate Strategic Alignment

Organizations strive to bridge the gap between strategy and results through the development of talent. Simulation-based or experiential learning is increasingly used to develop the mindset and capabilities needed to accelerate change, build engagement, and improve capability. Practitioners and researchers explore the role of experiential learning in accelerating business results.

Matthew Redmond, Fannie Mae, Chair

David Small, McDonalds Corporation, Panelist

Michael Schrage, MIT Sloan School of Management, Panelist

Stephen Kontra, Pfizer Learning Center, Panelist

Dan Parisi, BTS, Panelist

Submitter: Matthew Redmond, matthew_r_redmond@fanniemae.com
 


140. Symposium/Forum: 10:30 AM–12:20 PM  
Northwest 1

Underemployment: An Interdisciplinary Look at Operationalizations, Antecedents, and Outcomes

We present interdisciplinary research on one of the most prevalent organizational phenomena in the modern marketplace—underemployment. Although this topic has been the focus of researchers of various disciplines, they rarely share the knowledge they accumulated in this domain. This session aims to encourage such an interdisciplinary discussion about underemployment.

Aleksandra Luksyte, University of Houston, Co-Chair

Christiane Spitzmueller, University of Frankfurt/University of Houston, Co-Chair

Catherine E. Connelly, McMaster University, Christa L. Austin, DeGroote School of Business, Daniel Gallagher, James Madison University, Understanding Underemployment Among Contingent Workers

Meghna Virick, San Jose State University, Frances M. McKee-Ryan, University of Nevada, Reno, The Willingness to Be Underemployed: A Study of Unemployed Professionals

David Pedulla, Princeton University, Katherine S. Newman, Johns Hopkins University, Status Underemployment and Worker Well-Being

Aleksandra Luksyte, University of Houston, Christiane Spitzmueller, University of Frankfurt/University of Houston, Douglas C. Maynard, SUNY New Paltz, Meredith A Lynch, University of Houston, Are Overqualified Employees Outstanding Performers? Yes, if Complexity Is Present

Ana M. Hernandez, University of Valencia, Michael R. Bashshur, University Pompeu Fabra, Overeducation: Permanent or Transitory? Role of Time and Voluntary Turnover

Douglas C. Maynard, SUNY New Paltz, Discussant

Submitter: Aleksandra Luksyte, aluksyte@uh.edu


141. Panel Discussion: 10:30 AM–11:50 AM  
Northwest 5

The Science and Art of Identifying High-Potential Talent

There is a surging interest in identifying high-potential talent within organization in order to prepare them for future leadership roles. However, there are few standard solutions used by organizations to identify high-potential talent. Practitioners from organizations at different points in implementing their high-potential programs discuss this issue.

Anuradha Ramesh, PDI Ninth House, Chair

Kristine Wright, Cisco Systems, Inc., Panelist

Courtney L. Morewitz, Marriott International, Inc., Panelist

Brandon Sullivan, Target, Panelist

Lori Homer, Microsoft, Panelist

Submitter: Anuradha Ramesh, anuramesh@gmail.com
 


142. Community of Interest: 10:30 AM–11:50 AM  
PDR 2

Applicant Faking in Personality Testing

Richard L. Griffith, Florida Institute of Technology, Host

John J. Donovan, Rider University, Coordinator
 


143. Posters: 10:30 AM–11:20 AM  
SE Exhibit Hall

Careers/Coaching/Mentoring/Socialization/Onboarding/Retirement


143-1 Setting the Stage for Mentoring: Organizational Characteristics and Career Outcomes

There is an abundance of literature on mentoring relationships and career outcomes. Less is known about the contextual factors that facilitate informal mentoring. This study demonstrates organizational characteristics relate to mentoring experiences for women and that each influences career outcomes. Study findings and implications are discussed.

Cassaundra R. Leier, California State University-San Bernardino

Mark D. Agars, California State University-San Bernardino

Submitter: Mark Agars, Magars@csusb.edu
 

143-2 Development and Pilot Testing of a Business Networking Self-Assessment

It is becoming increasingly important for individuals in organizations to take an active role in creating business networks, which are critical to successful performance. This study describes the development of a 4-factor measure of networking, including reliability and validity results from an initial pilot of the assessment.

Patricia B. Barger, Development Dimensions International

Lisa Teeter, Development Dimensions International

Michael R. Kemp, Development Dimensions International

Evan F. Sinar, Development Dimensions International

Ryan J. Speckhart, Westinghouse Electric Company

Submitter: Patricia Barger, tbbarger@gmail.com
 

143-3 Strength in Adversity: Psychological Capital and Job Search During Unemployment

We examined the relationship among psychological capital, perceived employability, coping strategies, and job search. Results indicated that psychological capital positively impact perceived employability. Perceived employability in turn affects the type of job-loss coping strategies individuals adopt and subsequently their job-search behaviors. Implications of our findings are discussed.

Don J. Q. Chen, National University of Singapore

Vivien K. G. Lim, National University of Singapore

Submitter: Don Chen, g0800777@nus.edu.sg
 

143-4 Predictors of New Employee Socialization to Organizations

This longitudinal study investigated management trainees’ initial self-efficacy, person–organization fit, and person–job fit as predictors of socialization outcomes following training at job entry. Self-efficacy, person–organization fit, and needs–supplies fit measured at entry were significantly correlated with posttraining socialization, but only needs–supplies fit had independent effects on the socialization outcomes.

Abdifatah A. Ali, San Diego State University

Mark G. Ehrhart, San Diego State University

Lindsay E. Palmer, San Diego State University

Susan K. Drobka, San Diego State University

Karen Holcombe Ehrhart, San Diego State University

Lisa Kath, San Diego State University

Submitter: Mark Ehrhart, mehrhart@sunstroke.sdsu.edu
 

143-5 Career Commitment Mediating Proactive Personality and Multiple Mentoring Relationships

Careers today are characterized by job and organizational mobility. Thus, individuals need to seek help from many developmental sources, such as mentors, to advance in their careers. In this study, results showed that career commitment mediated the relationship between proactive personality and engagement in simultaneous multiple mentoring relationships.

Michelle M. Fleig-Palmer, University of Nebraska-Kearney

Submitter: Michelle Fleig-Palmer, fleigpalmerm@unk.edu
 

143-6 A New Approach to the Strong Interest Inventory Occupation Scales

A new method of building occupation scales for the Strong Interest Inventory Assessment was proposed that uses all available items and removes expert judgment. Results indicated improved reliability and solid initial validity evidence when compared to the current method. Implications for customized norm groups and automated scale construction are discussed.

Michael L. Morris, CPP, Inc.

Jessica J. Merten, St. Cloud State University

Submitter: Michael Morris, michael.lynn.morris@gmail.com
 

143-7 Social Network Centrality, Career Satisfaction, and Career Self-Efficacy in College

We hypothesized that students who are the most central within an academic social network will have more exposure to vicarious learning experiences that further their career development. Through the use of a social network analysis, we found that centrality was predictive of anticipated career satisfaction but not career self-efficacy.

Daniel A. Neyman, University of Akron

Jason Dahling, The College of New Jersey

Mindi Thompson, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Submitter: Daniel Neyman, dan31@zips.uakron.edu
 

143-8 A Field and Laboratory Study of Negative Mentoring Relationships

Recent research on mentoring has explored conditions in which mentoring is detrimental to the mentor or protégé. This 2-part study investigates whether psychosocial support or career development compensates for negative mentoring acts to provide an overall positive evaluation by persons observing the relationship and whether personality plays a role.

Keith Zabel, Wayne State University

Kimberly E. O’Brien, Central Michigan University

Submitter: Kimberly O’Brien, obrie1ke@cmich.edu
 

143-9 Affectivity, Mentoring, Commitment, and Turnover in Newcomers: A Dynamic Approach

Using a latent growth modeling approach, this research examines relationships among changes in perceived supervisor mentoring, organizational commitment (affective, normative, and continuance), and turnover intention among newcomers while accounting for trait affectivity. Using logistic regression, we further assess the relationships of changes in commitment and turnover intention to turnover.

Alexandra J. Panaccio, University of Illinois at Chicago

Christian Vandenberghe, HEC Montreal

Kathleen Bentein, University of Quebec at Montreal

Karim Mignonac, University of Toulouse 1 Capitole

Patrice Roussel, University of Toulouse 1 Capitole

Submitter: Alexandra Panaccio, alexandra-joelle.panaccio@hec.ca
 

143-10 Academic Mentoring Relationship Communication Processes and Participant-Reported Effectiveness

This study attempted to broaden our understanding of communication processes that occur in academic mentoring relationships. The Linguistic Inquiry Word Count (LIWC) program was used to examine numerous components of mentor and protégé communications and how these communications related to indicators of relationship effectiveness.

Shannon A. Scielzo, University of Texas at Arlington

Ajal B. Patel, University of Texas at Arlington

Submitter: Ajal Patel, ajal.patel@mavs.uta.edu
 

143-11 Mentoring in Academia: Who Needs It?

This study identified some personal and situational characteristics of faculty members associated with the perceived need for mentoring and determined that less experienced employees, women, and ethnic minorities reported significantly stronger needs for all mentoring functions. Employees who experienced incivility or discrimination reported a significantly higher need for psychosocial mentoring.

Stephanie C. Payne, Texas A&M University

Rebecca J. Thompson, Texas A&M University

Amanda D. Pesonen, Texas A&M University

Submitter: Stephanie Payne, scp@tamu.edu


143-12 Attachment Anxiety in Mentoring Relationships: The Mediating Role of Commitment

Relationship commitment was examined as a mediator in the association between protégé anxious attachment and the feedback behaviors of both mentors and protégés. Data were collected from doctoral student protégés and their faculty mentors. Results reveal the important role played by perceptions of partner commitment.

Laura Poteat, University of South Florida

Tammy D. Allen, University of South Florida

Kristen M. Shockley, Baruch College-CUNY

Submitter: Laura Poteat, lpoteat@mail.usf.edu
 

143-13 Challenging Tasks: The Role of Employees’ and Supervisors’ Goal Orientations

Employees differ with respect to the amount of challenge they have in their jobs. This may depend on their goal orientations or—if tasks are allocated to them—on the goal orientations of their supervisor. We indeed found that employees’ job challenge was related to supervisor goal orientations.

Paul Preenen, University of Amsterdam

Annelies E. M. Van Vianen, University of Amsterdam

Irene E. de Pater, University of Amsterdam

Submitter: Paul Preenen, paulpreenen@gmail.com
 

143-14 Proactivity Fits: Fit as Mediator Between Career Initiative and Success

Person–environment fit mediates the relationship of proactive career behaviors with career satisfaction and job performance. Using dyadic supervisor–subordinate data (n = 166), and casting career initiative as a predictor, it is concluded that needs–supplies fit mediates the relationship with career satisfaction and demands-abilities fit mediates the relationship with job performance.

Hella Sylva, University of Amsterdam

Stefan T. Mol, University of Amsterdam

Deanne N. Den Hartog, University of Amsterdam

Submitter: Hella Sylva, H.Sylva@uva.nl
 

143-15 Joint Effects of Internal and External Resources on Unemployment Outcomes

Internal resources (coping and self-efficacy) and an external resource (social support) were used as predictors of unemployment stress and job search behaviors. The combined effects of the internal predictors and the incremental prediction offered by social support was of particular interest. Results support the criticality of internal resources.

Meline M. Schaffer, Clemson University

Mary Anne Taylor, Clemson University

Lauren Ellis, Clemson University

Submitter: Mary Taylor, TaylorM@Clemson.edu
 

143-16 A Study of Ghiselli’s Hobo Syndrome

Defining characteristics of hobo syndrome should include both the exhibition of frequent job movement behavior and positive attitudes about such behavior. Evidence was found for its construct validity, based on a diverse sample of 944 U.S. workers. The dispositional roots of hobo syndrome and work-related outcomes were also explored.

Sang Eun Woo, Purdue University

Submitter: Sang Eun Woo, sewoo@psych.purdue.edu
 

143-17 Factors Predicting Success as an Executive Coach

Coaching has been increasingly common for the past 3 decades. It has been clearly demonstrated that use of an executive coach can improve performance but does not always. There is little understanding of what separates successful and unsuccessful coaches. This research sought to investigate qualities common to successful coaches.

Alison E. Carr, the University of Akron

Submitter: Alison Carr, aec33@zips.uakron.edu
 

143-18 Scalpels, not Hacksaws: Culturally Competent Coaching

Globalization drives the need for culturally diverse leaders. Furthermore, executive coaching has become increasingly popular to improve leader performance. However, coaching strategies may be differentially effective given different cultural values. It is proposed that culturally competent coaching, as applied to goal setting and feedback, will improve intercultural coaching effectiveness.

Christopher Coultas, University of Central Florida

Wendy L. Bedwell, University of Central Florida

Eduardo Salas, University of Central Florida

Shawn Burke, University of Central Florida

Submitter: Christopher Coultas, ccoultas@ist.ucf.edu


143-19 Career Velocity and Challenging Work Experiences

Challenging work experiences are viewed as an important tool of leadership development. In a field study using retail managers, we have evaluated the role of challenging work assignment. Results confirm that challenging work experiences are related to career success and advancement above and beyond mental ability and personality.

Jeff A. Weekley, Kenexa

Brad Hullsiek, University of Nebraska-Omaha

Roni Reiter-Palmon, University of Nebraska-Omaha

Submitter: Roni Reiter-Palmon, rreiter-palmon@mail.unomaha.edu


143-20 Development of a Competency-Based Executive Development Program

This paper outlines the development, delivery, and evaluation of an executive leadership development program designed for high-potential employees based on a leadership competency model. Each program component was linked to the company’s competency model. Components included external executive coaches, personality and 360 feedback, group strategic projects, and lectures.

William Shepherd, Huntington National Bank

Submitter: William Shepherd, williamjamesshepherd@hotmail.com


143-21 Changes in Commitment of Newcomers and Their Influence on Effectiveness

The commitment of newcomers to an organization and their commitment to their immediate supervisors are 2 critical psychological influences on newcomers’ adaptation. This study used the data from a 3-stage longitudinal survey to explore the relationships between organizational commitment, supervisory commitment, and outcome variables (such as turnover intention).

Yu-Chen Chao, National Chung Cheng University

Ding-Yu Jiang, National Chung Cheng University

Yu-Hsuan Lee, National Chung Cheng University

Submitter: Yu-Chen Chao, littleeyes0405@hotmail.com
 

143-22 A Longitudinal Study of Self-Control and Career Success

Previous research has indicated that personality characteristics are important predictors of career success. This longitudinal study examined dispositional self-control as a predictor of extrinsic and intrinsic career success. Results indicated this characteristic predicted extrinsic success through educational attainment and was indirectly related to intrinsic success through opportunity for achievement.

Patrick D. Converse, Florida Institute of Technology

Jaya Pathak, Florida Institute of Technology

Anne Marie D. Haddock, Florida Institute of Technology

Submitter: Jaya Pathak, jpathak@my.fit.edu


143-23 Evaluating Return on Investment: The Worth of Mentoring

This paper explains how to calculate a return on investment (ROI) for training programs. It walks through an example of how a mentoring firm estimated the ROI of its programs with limited data.

Kara Simon, University of Minnesota

Submitter: Kara Simon, simon510@umn.edu
 


144. Debate: 10:30 AM–11:50 AM  
Waldorf

Making Selection Decisions Using Test Scores: Robots Versus Fortune Tellers

How are test scores best used in selection decisions? This debate showcases consultants from 5 major employment testing companies addressing the fundamental issue of “mechanical” versus “clinical” models for test score use. Is it better to use algorithmic combinations of tests with decision rules or to emphasize judgment and interpretation?

Ken Lahti, PreVisor, Moderator

Greg A. Barnett, Hogan Assessment Systems, Presenter

Pamela J. Levine, PreVisor, Presenter

Lizzette Lima, Development Dimensions International, Presenter

Mark LoVerde, Valtera Corporation, Presenter

John D. Morrison, Kronos, Presenter

Submitter: Ken Lahti, klahti@previsor.com
 


145. Friday Seminars: 10:30 AM–1:30 PM  
Williford B

Earn 3 CE credits for attending. Preregistration required.

Economic Downturn: Psychological Issues

This seminar will focus on various ways I-O psychology can contribute to the understanding of, and coping with, the ongoing economic downturn. Specifically, it will start with discussing how economic behaviors can be analyzed from I-O psychology’s perspective, then address issues including individuals’ job search behaviors, coping behaviors (especially under unemployment), and engaging in entrepreneurial careers that are particularly relevant to the current economic situation.

Michael Frese, University of Giessen, Presenter

Ashley A. Walvoord, Verizon Wireless, Coordinator

Submitter: Ashley Walvoord, Ashley.walvoord@verizonwireless.com


146. Panel Discussion: 10:30 AM–11:50 AM  
Williford C

Coaching Women Through Backlash: Bridging Research and Practice

The goal of this session is to help researchers and practitioners who struggle with the nearly endemic problem of gender-based backlash in the workplace. A select panel of practitioners, coaches, and academics will engage the audience in developing practical strategies for dealing with backlash and a cutting-edge research agenda.

Belle Rose Ragins, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Chair

Anna Marie Valerio, Executive Leadership Strategies, LLC, Panelist

Laura Severance, University of Maryland, Panelist

Katherine Giscombe, Catalyst, Panelist

Marian N. Ruderman, Center for Creative Leadership, Panelist

Hannah R. Bowles, Harvard Kennedy School, Panelist

Submitter: Laura Severance, leseverance@gmail.com
 


147. Interactive Posters: 11:00 AM–11:50 AM  
Astoria

Bearers of Bad News: Research on Negative Feedback

Paul Levy, University of Akron, Facilitator
 

147-1 Ratee Reactions: Negative Feedback as a Motivating Force

Negative feedback is expected to enhance controlled forms of regulation and diminish autonomous forms of regulation. Using a self-determination theory approach to motivation, motivation is proposed to depend on the ratee’s social dominance orientation (SDO). Contrary to expectation, SDO moderated the autonomous regulations and not the controlled regulations.

Adam H. Kabins, Texas A&M University

Stephanie C. Payne, Texas A&M University

Mindy E. Bergman, Texas A&M University

Elizabeth Umphress, Texas A&M University

Submitter: Adam Kabins, ahk325@gmail.com
 

147-2 Using Positive Psychology to Generate Positive Emotions Following Negative Feedback

Effective developmental feedback promotes a balanced and authentic view of the employee’s current state. We present a conceptual model demonstrating how drawing on principles from positive psychology should increase the likelihood that negative feedback interventions will yield improved performance and behavior change while promoting employee well-being.

Alison L. O’Malley, Butler University

Jane B. (Brodie) Gregory, Procter & Gamble

Submitter: Alison O’Malley, aomalley@butler.edu
 

147-3 The Influence of Self-Oriented Perfectionism on Negative Performance Feedback

This study was conducted to examine affective, cognitive, and behavioral responses of self-oriented perfectionists upon receiving negative or positive performance feedback. High, moderate, and low self-oriented perfectionists varied in their affective and behavioral reactions to feedback that differed in sign but not in their cognitive reactions to feedback.

Sana Rizvi, University of Waterloo

Chris Wright, San Francisco State University

Eliza W. Wicher, Roosevelt University

Ryan Howell, San Francisco State University

Submitter: Sana Rizvi, sana.rizvi2@gmail.com
 

147-4 Individual Differences in Job Performance Feedback Reactions: A Ghanaian Study

Individual differences and performance appraisal reactions were studied in employees from Ghana, West Africa. Core self-evaluations, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Openness to Experience, and goal orientation influenced affective reactions and motivation to use feedback. Individual differences interacted with feedback favorability to predict affective reactions.

Mavis Baiden, Central Michigan University

Stephen H. Wagner, Grand Rapids Community College

Submitter: Stephen Wagner, swagner@grcc.edu
 


148. Special Events: 11:30 AM–12:20 PM  
Joliet

Celebrating Our Science and Practice: Looking Inward

SIOP is sometimes perceived to be a group divided into academics and practitioners. However, we must come together and celebrate both—our science and practice. Fortunately, we are a field comprised of people trained to help organizations with these very issues! In this invited panel, experts in conflict management, workplace diversity, change management, and cultural issues will “look inward” to apply best practices to provide us with evidence-based suggestions to improve our society for all.

Eduardo Salas, University of Central Florida, Chair

Lisa Finkelstein, Northern Illinois University, Co-Chair

Georgia T. Chao, Michigan State University, Panelist

Julie B. Olson-Buchanan, California State University, Fresno, Panelist

Kizzy M. Parks, K. Parks Consulting Inc., Panelist

Scott I. Tannenbaum, Group for Organizational Effectiveness, Panelist

Submitter: Eduardo Salas, esalas@ist.ucf.edu
 


149. Symposium/Forum: 11:30 AM–12:50 PM  
Lake Erie

Methodological Triangulation in the Study of Workplace Mistreatment

This symposium advances knowledge of workplace mistreatment with studies utilizing multiple research designs. Substantive topics addressed include the nature of workplace incivility, graduate student mistreatment, bystander reactions to aggression, and moderators of differential effects of sexual and nonsexual aggression. Legal and policy implications of the research will be discussed.

Benjamin M. Walsh, University of Connecticut, Co-Chair

Vicki J. Magley, University of Connecticut, Co-Chair

Susan M. Stewart, Western Illinois University, Nathan A. Bowling, Wright State University, Melissa L. Gruys, Wright State University, Reports of Mistreatment by Student Affiliates of SIOP

Lauren E. Zurbrugg, Texas A&M University, Kathi N. Miner-Rubino, Texas A&M University, Anthony R. Paquin, Western Kentucky University, A Qualitative Investigation of Gender Differences in Perceptions of Incivility

Tara C. Reich, University of Manitoba, M. Sandy Hershcovis, University of Manitoba, Observing Aggression at Work

Angela Dionisi, Queen’s University, Julian I. Barling, Queen’s University, Kathryne E. Dupre, Memorial University, Comparing the Consequences of Workplace Aggression and Sexual Harassment

David C. Yamada, Suffolk University Law School, Discussant

Submitter: Benjamin Walsh, benmikewalsh@gmail.com
 


150. Panel Discussion: 11:30 AM–12:50 PM  
Marquette

I-O Psychologists Taking the Lead in Human Resources

Human resources is evolving into a function that effectively leverages the skills and abilities of people to achieve business results. In this panel HR leaders from several industries will discuss how I-O psychologists are uniquely prepared for this evolution. Topics to be discussed are talent planning, game planning, and measurement.

Kim Stepanski, Pfizer, Panelist

Lisa B. Carey, Cengage Learning, Panelist

Julie A. Fuller, Avon Products, Panelist

Paige Ross, Pfizer, Panelist

Jessica L. Saltz, PepsiCo, Panelist

Janine Waclawski, Pepsi-Cola Company, Panelist

Submitter: Kim Stepanski, kim.stepanski@pfizer.com
 


151. Posters: 11:30 AM–12:20 PM  
SE Exhibit Hall

Job Performance/Citizenship/Counterproductive Behavior/Workplace Deviance


151-1 An Attribution-Centered Model of Personality and Voluntary Work Behavior

Voluntary work behavior can be either helpful or harmful to the organization. This study tested a model of voluntary work behavior in order to determine the mechanisms by which these behaviors are generated. Results suggested that personality influences voluntary work behavior directly as well as through attributions and emotions.

Candace Atamanik-Dunphy, Florida International University

Submitter: Candace Atamanik-Dunphy, catam001@fiu.edu
 

151-2 Five-Factor Model of Personality and Counterproductive Cyber Behaviors

Previous research has established that personality traits predict counterproductive workplace behaviors (CWBs). However, very little research has investigated whether personality traits can predict an emerging subset of CWBs: cyber behaviors. This study illustrates that counterproductive cyber behaviors can be predicted by the 5-factor model of personality.

Michael J. Cullen, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Steven S. Russell, Booz Allen Hamilton

Michael J. Bosshardt, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Suzanne E. Juraska, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Amy L. Stellmack, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Emily E. Duehr, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Kara R. Jeansonne, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Submitter: Michael Cullen, michael.cullen@pdri.com
 

151-3 How and When Bottom-Line Mentality Is Related to Social Undermining

We provide a conceptualization and measure of bottom-line mentality (BLM). We also examine employee BLM as a conditional mediator between supervisor BLM and coworker perceptions of social undermining. Employee BLM, as a conditional indirect effect, is hypothesized to vary depending on employees’ core self-evaluation, Conscientiousness, and job performance.

Rebecca L. Greenbaum, Oklahoma State University

Mary Bardes, Drexel University

Gabi M. Eissa, Oklahoma State University

Submitter: Gabi Eissa, gabi@okstate.edu
 

151-4 Predicting Dishonest Online Test-Taking Behavior in Unproctored Internet-Based Testing

This study integrated survey development techniques from the literature on integrity testing in order to develop measures to predict cheating behaviors. An overt and a personality-based integrity test contextualized to online testing were developed, each of which explained incremental variance above traditional integrity tests in cheating behaviors on knowledge-based online tests.

Rachel C. Johnson, Old Dominion University

Gregory P. Leffler, Old Dominion University

Richard N. Landers, Old Dominion University

Submitter: Rachel Johnson, rjohn104@odu.edu
 

151-5 Preventing Deviant Behavior in Achievement Settings Among Young Workers

We propose a preventive model where a positive work environment is related to lower levels of deviant behaviors in the workplace and at school via a motivational process involving work cynicism and intrinsic work motivation. We surveyed 319 adolescents employed in numerous organizations and found support for the model.

Stacey R. Kessler, Montclair State University

Michael R. Frone, State University of New York at Buffalo

Submitter: Stacey Kessler, stacey9815@aol.com
 

151-6 Sleep Deprivation, Moral Disengagement, and Cheating

This study investigated main and interaction effects of sleep deprivation and moral disengagement on cheating behavior. In a laboratory setting, self-report measures of moral disengagement and behavioral measures of cheating were used. Subjects were randomly assigned to conditions that involved either sleep deprivation or no sleep deprivation.

Mel Win Khaw, University of Arizona

Michael S. Christian, University of North Carolina

Jerel E. Slaughter, University of Arizona

Submitter: Mel Win Khaw, khaw.melwin@gmail.com


151-7 Deviant Behavior Impression Management: A Newly Proposed Impression Management Dimension

This paper proposes a new category of impression management termed deviant behavior impression management (DBIM). Drawing from the impression management and workplace deviance literatures, a theoretical model is proposed that shows how socialization processes influence a newcomer’s propensity to engage in deviant workplace behaviors.

Angela M. Langevin-Heavey, Cornell University

Submitter: Angela Langevin, aml265@cornell.edu
 

151-8 Aberrant Self-Promoters at Work

This study examined the relationship between aberrant self-promotion and accidents, absenteeism and turnover. Two applicant samples were used to test the hypotheses. Although mixed results were found, results indicate that aberrant self-promoters are more likely to be unsafe, take absenteeism less seriously, and may be a termination risk.

Amie D. Lawrence, Select International, Inc.

Matthew S. O’Connell, Select International, Inc.

Submitter: Amie Lawrence, alawrence@selectintl.com
 

151-9 “Little White Lies?” Establishing a Baseline of Applicant Dissimulation

This study examined self-reported applicant deception across various selection domains: cognitive ability testing, personality assessment, personal history, and job interview. The results revealed that applicant deception is a relatively common phenomenon in selection and frequently occurs across selection domains.

Lindsey M. Lee, Florida Institute of Technology

Richard L. Griffith, Florida Institute of Technology

Submitter: Lindsey Lee, lmlee02@gmail.com
 

151-10 Psychological Capital as a Moderator of Job Stress and Incivility

This study examined whether psychological capital (PsyCap) moderates the relationship between job stress and incivility. Results demonstrated that individuals low in PsyCap displayed more incivility in response to job stress compared to those high in PsyCap, suggesting that PsyCap buffers the influence of stress on incivility.

Sara J. Roberts, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Lisa L. Scherer, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Casey Bowyer, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Submitter: Sara Roberts, sthomsen@mail.unomaha.edu
 

151-11 Development of a Taxonomy of Cyber Behaviors

The purpose of this study was to develop a comprehensive taxonomy of cyber behaviors. Knowledgeable SMEs generated, sorted, and retranslated lists of innocuous, risky, and malicious cyber behaviors, and principal components analysis was used to develop a set of 11 cyber behavior dimensions.

Steven S. Russell, Booz Allen Hamilton

Michael J. Cullen, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Michael J. Bosshardt, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Suzanne E. Juraska, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Amy L. Stellmack, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Emily E. Duehr, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Kara R. Jeansonne, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes

Submitter: Steven Russell, russell_steven@bah.com
 

151-12 When Bullying Pays Off: Political Skill and Job Performance

Recent studies suggest that 84% of employees are affected in some manner by workplace bullies. This study integrates theory from social information processing and political skill to explain how bullies can successfully navigate the social and political organizational environment and achieve higher ratings of performance.

Darren C. Treadway, State University of New York at Buffalo

Brooke A. Shaughnessy, State University of New York at Buffalo

Jacob W. Breland, University of Mississippi

Maiyuwai Reeves, State University of New York at Buffalo

Margaret Roberts, State University of New York at Buffalo

Submitter: Brooke Shaughnessy, bas29@buffalo.edu
 

151-13 Self-Esteem and Counterproductive Behavior: A Meta-Analytic Review

We sought to estimate the population correlation between self-esteem and counterproductive work behavior. Using 17 correlations, representing 4,302 individuals, the analysis estimated the population correlation between these 2 variables to be -0.25. The relationship is strongest in samples with older adults.

Christopher E. Whelpley, Virginia Commonwealth University

Michael A. McDaniel, Virginia Commonwealth University

Submitter: Christopher Whelpley, whelpleyce@vcu.edu
 

151-14 Aberrant Personality and Choice of Negotiation Tactics

A series of 2 studies examined the relationship between the aberrant personality traits, more specifically psychopathy, and ethical and unethical negotiation tactics. Results across the 2 studies suggest a positive relationship between psychopathy and self-reported likelihood of using unethical negotiation tactics.

Jane Wu, Purdue University

James M. LeBreton, Purdue University

Submitter: Jane Wu, jane.y.wu00@gmail.com
 

151-15 Organizational Citizenship Behavior, Employer Support, and Unit-Level Outcomes: Longitudinal Study

This study is a response to recent calls for more research on causal relationships between organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and organizational-level outcomes. Utilizing a longitudinal design with 2 years of unit-level employee and financial data, the results provide evidence that unit-level OCB has a causal effect on key business metrics.

Brian Frost, Corvirtus

Dan Koys, DePaul University

Submitter: Brian Frost, bfrost@corvirtus.com
 

151-16 Medical Students’ Knowledge About Medical Professionalism Predicts Their Professional Performance

We developed a measure of medical students’ knowledge of medical professionalism and assessed its validity in predicting professional aspects of their performance during their family medicine clerkship. After controlling for the strong interrcorrelation between technical and professional performance (likely halo error), knowledge scores were significantly associated with students’ medical professionalism.

Michelle Martin, Rice University

Stephan J. Motowidlo, Rice University

Submitter: Harrison Kell, harrison.kell@rice.edu
 

151-17 Exchange Ideology and POS in the PC Breach–Performance Relationship

We examined 3-way interactions among exchange ideology, perceived organizational support, and psychological contract breach in terms of employees’ subsequent performance. Results indicated that low organizational support intensified the negative effects of PC breach on performance for individuals with high exchange ideology. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

Jung Hyun Lee, George Washington University

Anjali Chaudhry, Saint Xavier University

Amanuel G. Tekleab, Wayne State University

Submitter: Jung Hyun Lee, junghyun@gwu.edu
 

151-18 The Antecedents of Procedural Knowledge and Skill

102 undergraduates completed our measure of procedural knowledge and participated in 9 role plays simulating interactions between physicians and their patients. Six graduate students rated each video-taped performance for overall effectiveness. Relations among personality traits, values, procedural knowledge scores, and role-play performance were explored.

Michelle Martin, Rice University

Harrison J. Kell, Rice University

Stephan J. Motowidlo, Rice University

Submitter: Michelle Martin, mpm5042@rice.edu
 

151-19 Evaluating Rater Trainings With Double-Pretest, One-Posttest Designs

Unlike past research on rater trainings that focused on differences between trained and nontrained raters, these studies used a double-pretest, one-posttest design. Study 1 with a student sample (N = 60) found both a testing effect and an additional training effect. Study 2 with professionals (N = 46) replicated these results.

Klaus Moser, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg

Verena Kemter, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg

Kerstin Wachsmann, Self-employed

Nora Z. Köver, Self-employed

Roman Soucek, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg

Submitter: Klaus Moser, Klaus.Moser@wiso.uni-erlangen.de
 

151-20 Goal Achievement Among Elite Performers

The study assessed the determinants of high level performance among NCAA Division-I swimmers. Self-report and objective data were collected longitudinally on multiple performance measures and multiple performance determinants. Past performance, feedback, experience, and coaching had the largest effects.

Michael W. Natali, University of Minnesota

John P. Campbell, University of Minnesota

Submitter: Michael Natali, nata0017@umn.edu
 

151-21 Do Rater Ratings of Employee Performance Reflect Actual Job Performance?

Sources of variance in job performance ratings were decomposed into ratee, rater, and error components using HLM. The majority of variance in job performance ratings was attributable to raters. Raters’ familiarity with targets was positively associated with job performance ratings and the criterion validity of the ratees’ Conscientiousness scores.

Thomas A. O’Neill, University of Western Ontario

Richard D. Goffin, University of Western Ontario

Ian R. Gellatly, University of Alberta

Submitter: Thomas O’Neill, toneill7@gmail.com
 

151-22 The Consequences of Speaking Up: Rater Characteristics and Voice Type

In 3 laboratory studies, we examine how perceivers’ evaluation of voice behavior is influenced by (a) perceivers’ disposition (Openness and dogmatism) and by (b) how voice is presented (constructive vs. complaining). Our findings suggest that perceiver perspective taking mediated the interactive effect of perceiver characteristics and voice type.

Dan S. Chiaburu, Texas A&M University

Chunyan Peng, Michigan State University

Linn Van Dyne, Michigan State University

Submitter: Chunyan Peng, peng@bus.msu.edu
 

151-23 Fitting Person–Environment Fit in a Demand-Control Framework

This study examined the interactive effects of work control and desire for environmental control on task performance outcomes. Work control and desired control were manipulated, and participants engaged in problem-solving tasks. Matches between actual control and desired control resulted in higher performance than mismatches, supporting person–environment fit theory.

Alex T. Ramsey, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale

Paul E. Etcheverry, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale

Submitter: Alex Ramsey, aramsey@siu.edu
 

151-24 Understanding and Predicting First-Line Supervisor Performance

Models of executive leadership are common in extant literature, but little research has focused on lower level field supervisors. This paper presents the development of a first-line supervisor performance model and evidence of its usefulness via validation of a unique theoretically derived selection assessment for first-line supervisors.

Ryan P. Robinson, Kronos Inc.

Aarti Shyamsunder, Infosys Leadership Institute

Submitter: Ryan Robinson, robinsry22@yahoo.com
 

151-25 Proactive Personality, Emotional Exhaustion, and Nontask Performance

We investigated the links between proactive personality, emotional exhaustion, and nontask performance. We found that emotional exhaustion was negatively related to coworker-reported organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and positively to coworker-reported counterproductive work behavior (CWB). Furthermore, proactive personality moderated the relationships between emotional exhaustion and OCB/CWB.

Ozgun Bu Rodopman, Bogazici University

Ashley A. Walvoord, Verizon Wireless

Submitter: Ozgun Rodopman, burcu.rodopman@boun.edu.tr
 

151-26 Breaks With Coworkers: A Mechanism to Enhanced Performance

One important yet not well studied workplace resource is the work break. This study examined the relationships between behavior during work breaks and employee outcomes. Results suggested that the quality of social interaction received during work breaks was related to work engagement and self-perceived contextual performance.

Sherilyn Romanik, University of Alaska Anchorage

Ann H. Huffman, Northern Arizona University

Candice Perks, Northern Arizona University

Submitter: Sherilyn Romanik, ansar2@uaa.alaska.edu


151-27 Helping Yourself by Helping Others: An Examination of Personality Perceptions

In an experiment examining the effect of altruistic behavior on work outcomes, we found that altruistic employees were perceived as having more favorable personality characteristics and received higher performance ratings and greater reward recommendations than their counterparts. In addition, personality perceptions partially mediated the relation between altruistic behavior and work outcomes.

Patrick J. Rosopa, Clemson University

Anna Hulett, Elon University

Amber N. Schroeder, Clemson University

Submitter: Patrick Rosopa, prosopa@clemson.edu
 

151-28 A Moderated Latent Variable Model of Organizational Citizenship Behavior

Using a sample of 357 executives in India, a moderated latent variable model of individual and contextual antecedents of OCB was tested using SEM procedures. Analyses confirmed the agreement between our hypotheses and the findings. We conclude by discussing theoretical and practical implications of our findings.

Soumendu Biswas, Management Development Institute

Arup Varma, Loyola University Chicago

Submitter: Arup Varma, avarma@luc.edu
 

151-29 Predicting Employee Contextual Performance: Pattern Versus Variable Approach

This study investigated the usefulness of latent profile analysis (LPA) in determining the personality-contextual performance relationship. Results partially support LPA, as profile membership explained incremental variance in contextual performance above that explained by the personality variables used to form profiles, although profile variables were not significantly related to contextual performance.

Amy DuVernet, North Carolina State University

Clara E. Hess, DC Public Charter School

Mark A. Wilson, North Carolina State University

Submitter: Amy DuVernet, amyduv@gmail.com